Undergraduate Course Catalog 2012-2013

Welcome to the 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions

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Course Descriptions

ACCT 214 Financial Accounting 3 cr.

Provides an introduction to the discipline of accounting; the principles of external financial reporting; and the use of general purpose financial statements (balance sheet, income statement and statement of cash flows) in decision making. Students will develop a basic understanding of how to use the financial statements to assess the profitability, liquidity and solvency of business entities. Lecture.

ACCT 215 Managerial Accounting 3 cr.

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to cost concepts, product costing systems, budgeting systems, and the development of accounting data for internal managerial decisions. Lecture.

ACCT 310 Acccounting Information Systems 3 cr.

This course develops a sound understanding of the practices and procedures used to process accounting information. Emphasis is placed on computerized information systems. Lecture.

ACCT 311 Intermediate Accounting I 3 cr.

This course is an investigation and analysis of the accounting problems and practices of the corporation, with detailed study of the component elements of the balance sheet and income statement. Basic topics include: generally accepted accounting principles, financial statements, income determination, and presentation. Lecture.

ACCT 312 Intermediate Accounting II 3 cr.

This course is an investigation and analysis of the accounting problems and practices of the corporation, with detailed study of the component elements of the balance sheet and income statement. Basic topics include: generally accepted accounting principles, financial statements, income determination and presentation. Lecture.

ACCT 314 Advanced Accounting 3 cr.

Exposes students to some of the more advanced and topical accounting subject matter. Potential areas of study include accounting for partnerships, accounting for governmental entities, the preparation of consolidated financial statements and foreign currency transactions and translations. Lecture.

ACCT 315 Cost Accounting 3 cr.

This course addresses the use of accounting information for purposes of cost determination, cost control and cost analysis. Topics include: cost terminology, cost behavior, job order costing, process costing, cost allocations, and standard costing. Lecture.

ACCT 411W Auditing 3 cr.

Standards and procedures employed by auditors in the examination of financial statements for the purpose of rendering an opinion are studied and evaluated. Case problems are used to demonstrate the application of the principles studied. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ACCT 412 Introduction to Income Tax Accounting 3 cr.

This course is a study of basic tax regulations and procedures affecting individuals, and to a lesser extent, business units. Principle topics include: returns, rates, exemptions, income, deductions, sales and exchanges of assets, and credits. Lecture.

ACCT 414 Corporate/Partnership Tax 3 cr.

This course acquaints the student with the principles of taxation as applied to corporations, shareholders, partnerships and partners. Lecture.

ARHY 100 Understanding Art 3 cr.

This course is an introduction to the theories of art and to the roles of art in society. Students are exposed to compositional principles, thematic content, the vocabulary of art, techniques and media, and the historical context of artistic styles. Formal analysis, iconographic content, and an interdisciplinary perspective of the arts are covered. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 100C Understanding Art 3 cr.

This course is an introduction to the theories of art and to the roles of art in society. Students are exposed to compositional principles, thematic content, the vocabulary of art, techniques and media, and the historical context of artistic styles. Formal analysis, iconographic content, and an interdisciplinary perspective of the arts are covered. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 102 Introduction to Modern Art 3 cr.

A survey of Western art from the middle of the 19th century to the end of the 20th century. Topics include Impressionism, Cubism, Surrealism, Pop Art and Postmodernism. Lecture.

ARHY 105 Design Theory and Practice 3 cr.

A course with a hands on component, in which students study design theory and history, and the role of design and designers in contemporary life. Lecture.

ARHY 111 Art History-Ancient to Medieval World 3 cr.

A chronologically-oriented, detailed presentation of the history of Western art. This survey deals with Near Eastern, Greek, Roman, Early Christian and Medieval art. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 111C Art History-Ancient to Medieval World 3 cr.

A chronology oriented, detailed presentation of the history of Western art. This survey deals with Near Eastern, Greek, Roman, Early Christian and Medieval art. Can be elected to fulfill the history literature requirement. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 112 Art History-Renaissance to Modern World 3 cr.

A continuation of 111. Surveys Renaissance, Baroque and Modern art in Western Europe. Can be elected to fulfill the history/literature requirements. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 161 Arts and the Human Experience 3 cr.

This course will expose students to artistic expression that is timeless yet immediate, universal while individual, complex but accessible. Students will learn that the arts demand responses--emotional, intellectual, mystical, positive or negative. Through this dialogue we are reminded that we are human, and that we are not alone. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 175 Introduction to Asian Art 3 cr.

A survey of the art and archaeology of China, Japan, Korea and India with an emphasis on the art's historical and social context. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

ARHY 205 Christian Art and Architecture of Rome 3 cr.

This study of the major stylistic forms of Christian art as evidenced in the art and architecture of Rome is offered at the Italian campus. Beginning with the adaptive forms of Early Christian art at the time of the late Roman Empire in the third and fourth centuries, this course will study, largely through on-site visits, the Early Christian, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque stylistic periods and monuments. The course will include the architecture of the church, as well as sculpture, mosaic, and painting. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 210 American Art 3 cr.

An overview of American architecture, painting, sculpture and decorative arts intended to acquaint the student with the major trends and contributions of American art from colonial to modern times. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 217 Religion, Reason and Visual Culture 3 cr.

Students will examine how faith and reason are expressed in art, and the tensions that exist between faith and reason both in the creative process itself, and in artists' responses to their cultures and religious experiences. Lecture. Theme Area Faith and Reason.

ARHY 220 History of Photography 3 cr.

A survey of photographic developments from the early 19th C. to the present. Emphasis is upon the United States and upon the interaction of and confrontation between artists and photographers. Lecture.

ARHY 226 The American Home 3 cr.

This course selectively surveys domestic architecture in the United States from colonial times to the present. Students will study important aesthetic, social, cultural, and economic factors that have influenced the forms of housing in the United States. In addition to examining the history of both popular and innovative styles, students will look at interior design to discover how the layout and decoration of homes changed over time to reflect different needs and aspirations. The course will use the rich and diverse housing architecture of the Pittsburgh region as a field school for visits and study, and there will be hands-on practice in methods related to historical research and historic preservation. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 230 History of Western Architecture 3 cr.

This course is an introduction to the Western tradition of architecture from ancient times through the 20th century. The course is organized into chronological units with lectures presenting technical and stylistic developments within standard time frames. Each unit of the course features key monuments that identify specific advances in technology and style and represent a particular phase of architectural development. Lecture.

ARHY 275 Introduction to Asian Art 3 cr.

A survey of the art and archaeology of China, Japan, Korea and India with an emphasis on the art's historical and social context. Lecture.

ARHY 285 Issues of Social Justice in Visual Culture 3 cr.

This course examines how visual culture reflects and influences issues of social justice, whether as commentaries, historical records, or as visual rhetorical arguments. Visual culture resources from a variety of sources and cultures are used, and students engage in analyzing visual culture from an informed and critical perspective. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

ARHY 290 Non-Western Art 3 cr.

This course is a survey of the art of nonwestern cultures and civilizations. It includes the arts of Asia, Africa, and Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts, Theme Area Global Diversity.

ARHY 305 Roman Art and Architecture 3 cr.

"Baroque" is the term given to the stylistic period of the seventeenth century, and is a style that was created in the city of Rome. Today, the Rome we see is a Baroque city. This course will examine the major art and architecture of the city of Rome, including St. Peter's, the Baroque piazzas and fountains, and some of the notable painters such as Caravaggio. This course is offered through the Italian campus and will meet largely onsite in the city of Rome. Lecture.

ARHY 311W Writing History 3 cr.

ARHY 312 Identity and Representation 3 cr.

An examination in the ways visual culture defines and informs, in both good ways and bad, accurate and inaccurate views and opinions regarding others in society, especially those from different cultures. Lecture.

ARHY 314 Introduction to Archaeology 3 cr.

An overview of the discipline of archaeology. We will consider the discipline's aims, history, theories, and methods, and will devote special attention to its modern practice, problems, ethical concerns, and significance. Also important will be the study of a wide range of archaeological sites throughout the world. Lecture.

ARHY 315 Archaeological History-Greek World 3 cr.

A survey of the archaeology of Greece from prehistory to the Roman period. Lecture.

ARHY 315W Archaeological History-Greek World 3 cr.

A survey of the archaeology of Greece from prehistory to the Roman period. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ARHY 316 Archaeological History of Athens 3 cr.

The gods provided a major focus for the Greeks in every aspect of their lives, from politics to sports, theater, and daily routine. In this course we will study the sanctuaries of the Greeks as we examine religious architecture and sculpture, votive offerings, and the sacred precincts themselves in order to achieve a better understanding of the ancient Greeks and their culture. Lecture.

ARHY 316W Archaeological History of Athens 3 cr.

The gods provided a major focus for the Greeks in every aspect of their lives, from politics to sports, theater, and daily routine. In this course we will study the sanctuaries of the Greeks as we examine religious architecture and sculpture, votive offerings, and the sacred precincts themselves in order to achieve a better understanding of the ancient Greeks and their culture. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ARHY 317 Archaeological History-Ancient Roman World 3 cr.

Examination of the archaeology and art of the ancient Roman world-as well as its literature, epigraphy, and later sources-enables us to reconstruct the history and culture of these people and their predecessors. In this course, in addition to studying archaeological techniques and the history of archaeology, we will examine Roman history and culture through its artifacts, art and architecture. We will also discuss such central issues as archaeological ethics and legality, collections, and public display in order to have better understanding of archaeology as a discipline. Lecture.

ARHY 317W Archaeological History-Ancient Roman World 3 cr.

Examination of the archaeology and art of the ancient Roman world-as well as its literature, epigraphy, and later sources-enables us to reconstruct the history and culture of these people and their predecessors. In this course, in addition to studying archaeological techniques and the history of archaeology, we will examine Roman history and culture through its artifacts, art and architecture. We will also discuss such central issues as archaeological ethics and legality, collections, and public display in order to have better understanding of archaeology as a discipline. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ARHY 318 Archeological History of Rome 3 cr.

An investigation of the topography and monuments of Rome from prehistory through Constantine. Lecture.

ARHY 318W Archaeological History of Rome 3 cr.

An investigation of the topography and monuments of Rome from prehistory through Constantine. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ARHY 321 15th Century Renaissance Art 3 cr.

An investigation of the Renaissance spirit of the 15th century. Concentration is upon comparisons of Northern and Southern attitudes of man, nature, and social structure, and to materials, techniques, pictorial representation, and iconography. Lecture.

ARHY 321W 15th Century Renaissance Art 3 cr.

An investigation of the Renaissance spirit of the 15th century. Concentration is upon comparisons of Northern and Southern attitudes of man, nature, and social structure, and to materials, techniques, pictorial representation, and iconography. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ARHY 331 Impressionism and Post-Impressionism 3 cr.

This course examines the innovations in western art at the end of the 19th century, as artists lay the foundations of Modernism. Artists studied include Monet, Renoir, Van Gogh,and Gauguin. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 332 Art of the 20th Century 3 cr.

Examination of the major American and European artists and movements of the early twentieth century. Beginning with the work of Cezanne and his impact on the formation of Cubism and Futurism, the contradictions and parallels in the various avant- garde practices from 1905-1945 are assessed and evaluated. The changing affiliations of artists, such as their political and aesthetic associations, are a major emphasis. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 332W Art of the 20th Century 3 cr.

Examination of the major American and European artists and movements of the early twentieth century. Beginning with the work of Cezanne and his impact on the formation of Cubism and Futurism, the contradictions and parallels in the various avant-garde practices from 1905-1945 are assessed and evaluated. The changing affiliations of artists, such as their political and aesthetic associations, are a major emphasis. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ARHY 340 Art of India and Southeast Asia 3 cr.

This course examines the art of India and South East Asia, paying particular attention to the developments in religious art over time. Art of the modern period in these cultures is also addressed. Lecture.

ARHY 341 Arts of China and Japan 3 cr.

This course examines the art of China and Japan, paying particular attention to the developments in religious art over time. Art of the modern period in these cultures is also addressed. Lecture.

ARHY 349 Modern Art in Rome 1 cr.

ARHY 360 German Art of the 20th Century 3 cr.

This course examines the development, decline and resurgence of German Art in the twentieth century, which spans periods of political ferment and two wars, increased industrialization, urbanization, and tremendous social transitions. The course also addresses the changing role of artists and their public, and the roles of collectors, museums, exhibitions, and Nazi censorship. Lecture.

ARHY 361 Michelangelo, Caravaggio, and Bernini 3 cr.

This course will study the art and personalities of three great superstars of Italy's golden age of art-The Renaissance and Baroque periods. Internationally famous and influential, patronized by popes and princes, at times irascible, opinionated, or even violent, these artists defined the artistic styles of these periods, and transformed how the world saw art and artists. Lecture.

ARHY 363 Modern Art and Science 3 cr.

This course will explore how scientific discoveries, ideas and concepts have impacted artists and their works. Focusing on art created from the Renaissance through the present, this class will examine the links between art and science in various media, including painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, installation art and multimedia works. Lecture.

ARHY 367 High Renaissance Art in Rome 3 cr.

A study of the period of culmination in Renaissance art, as found in the art and monuments of Rome created during the late 15th and early 16th centuries. Artists like Michelangelo, Raphael, and Bramante will be the focus. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 368 Surrealism 3 cr.

Dada and Surrealism were two radical and highly influential art movements of the twentieth century that explored concepts still at the forefront of art today, such as appropriation, irony, the subconscious, and the very definition of art itself. While Dada's nihilism led it to be short-lived, Surrealism flourished in the visual arts and literature, and still informs compositions today. Lecture.

ARHY 368W Dada and Surrealism 3 cr.

Dada and Surrealism were two radical and highly influential art movements of the twentieth century that explored concepts still at the forefront of art today, such as appropriation, irony, the subconscious, and the very definition of art itself. While Dada's nihilism led it to be short-lived, Surrealism flourished in the visual arts and literature, and still informs compositions today. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts, University Core Writing Intens.

ARHY 373 Christian Literature and Art 3 cr.

- Lecture.

ARHY 376 Pop Art to the Present 3 cr.

A study of the neo-avant-garde from 1945 to the present in the major international art centers and in America. The reception of the various modernist movements of contemporary art are examined in the context of social and cultural changes in the twentieth century. Major movements included are Abstract Expressionism, Realism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Happenings, Performance Art, Conceptual Art, and the New Art of the Eighties. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 379 Origins of Renaissance Art 3 cr.

A study of the beginnings of Italian Renaissance art, focusing on the artists Brunelleschi, Donatello, Masaccio, and their work in the city of Florence Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 381 Art and Politics 3 cr.

This course will focus on the concentrations between art and politics from the French Revolution through the present. In addition to examining works of art in various media, this course will explore the socio-historical contexts that prompted each work and how social and political issues and controversies impact the art world. Lecture.

ARHY 385 Baroque Painting and Sculpture 3 cr.

A survey of Baroque Art of the 17th century, with particular emphasis on the art of Italy, France and the Netherlands. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ARHY 396 Public History: Peoples' Pasts 3 cr.

ARHY 396: Public History: Intro and Issues Students explore different applications of and for History. This course surveys the various specializations across the field of Public History, including current museum, archival, archaeological, and historical preservation theories and practices. Students will assist a community partner in a history project. Approved for Service Learning. Lecture.

ARHY 398 Art and Society 3 cr.

This course will explore the ways that social and political conditions and demands affect artists' aesthetic choices. Although many of the examples discussed in class will be drawn from the visual arts, other art forms such as literature, drama, music and dance will also be included as appropriate. The class will examine thematic topics through history such as art and social protest, art in the service of governments, and commercial art. We will also look at issues of controversy in contemporary art worlds as they affect artistic production. Lecture.

ARHY 398W Art and Society 3 cr.

This course explores the ways that social and political conditions and demands affect artists' aesthetic choices. Although many of the examples discussed in class are drawn from the visual arts, other art forms such as literature, drama, music and dance are included as appropriate. The class will examine thematic topics through history such as art and social protest, art in the service of governments, and commercial art. It also looks at issues of controversy in contemporary art worlds as they affect artistic production. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ARHY 400 Art History Capstone Tutorial 1 cr.

Required of senior majors who declared after July 1, 2006. Working with their mentor in their final semester, art history majors will review their cumulative portfolio and evaluate their learning and achievements in the discipline. Other.

ARHY 411 Museum Roles and Practices 3 cr.

This course studies the roles art museums have played and continue to play in culture. Students will be introduced to the theoretical, curatorial, and educational principles of current museum practices, and also to the practical considerations faced by cultural institutions. Museum visits and field trips are required of all students. Lecture.

ARHY 429 Historical Preservation 3 cr.

This course is on the movements and organizations that developed to save, protect, and present historical sites. It introduces preservation law and procedures established to survey and list buildings and sites as national, state, and local treasures. Lecture.

ARHY 429W Historic Preservation 3 cr.

This course is on the movements and organizations that developed to save, protect, and present historical sites. It introduces preservation law and procedures established to survey and list buildings and sites as national, state, and local treasures. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ARHY 431W Selected Readings-Various Topics Fine Art 3 cr.

Selected Readings consists of a tutorial in which a student reads extensively and prepares reports on a topic chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor and mentor. Readings. University Core Writing Intens.

ARHY 441 American Painting and Sculpture 3 cr.

Selected topics in 18th, 19th, and early 20th century American Art History are examined in the context of social, political, cultural and economic issues. Topic examples include: The Changing American Landscapes in the 19th Century; American Portraiture; American Impressionism; American Women Artists; The Rise of American Art Academies; Art Criticism and Patronage, Exhibitions, and Museum Institutions. Lecture.

ARHY 441W American Painting and Sculpture 3 cr.

Selected topics in 18th, 19th, and early 20th century American Art History are examined in the context of social, political, cultural and economic issues. Topic examples include: The Changing American Landscapes in the 19th Century; American Portraiture; American Impressionism; American Women Artists; The Rise of American Art Academies; Art Criticism and Patronage, Exhibitions, and Museum Institutions. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ARHY 442W American Architecture 3 cr.

This course studies construction, style, building types, and concepts of city planning in American architecture from the 17th century to the present. The social and political forces affecting style are emphasized. The course also includes an introduction to the theory and practice of historic preservation. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ARHY 443W American Decorative Arts 3 cr.

Decorative arts from the Pilgrims to the Bauhaus influence are examined in context: historical, formal, technological, and cultural. Field trips to area collections are scheduled. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ARHY 474W Michelangelo: His Art, His World 3 cr.

This course examines the genius of Michelangelo in the context of the artistic and cultural forces which combined to create the Renaissance. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ARHY 478 Art - Internship 1 TO 6 cr.

Practical experience in art related areas introduces the student to the many opportunities in the art field. Permission of the art history faculty required. Internship.

ARHY 490W Women and Art 3 cr.

This course examines women artists and also art about women. Through a variety of methodologies, it discusses the marginalization of and cultural attitudes toward women throughout history, the institutional obstacles they faced, and recent research that explores critical and cultural evalutions and re-evaluations of their work. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ATHT 201 Essential Concepts and Techniques in Athletic Training 3 cr.

This course provides pre-professional students with an introduction to the basic and essential elements of athletic training including emergency evaluation, diagnosis and management leading to CPR, AED, and First Aid certifications; prevention, recognition and management of environmental conditions on the body; recognition and management of spinal cord and head injuries; evaluation, diagnosis, management techniques for conditions of the lower body; professional development; and development medical notation techniques . Lecture.

ATHT 201L Essential Concepts and Techniques in Athletic Training Lab 0 cr.

Students must acquire 50 hours of guided observation/clinical experience in Athletic Training, as well as participate in laboratory sessions associated with lecture requirements. Laboratory.

ATHT 202 Pre-Professional Practicum in Athletic Training 2 cr.

This course provides students with guided discovery activities to reinforce the information and psychomotor skills learned in ATHT 201/201L to further develop clinical proficiency in the evaluation, diagnosis, management techniques for conditions of the upper body. Students also will be presented with information and skill development opportunities with pre-participation evaluations, equipment safety and fitting, and medical supply organization and management. Lecture.

ATHT 202L Pre-Professional Practicum in Athletic Training Lab 0 cr.

Students must acquire 50 hours of guided observation/clinical experience in Athletic Training, as well as participate in laboratory sessions associated with lecture requirements. Laboratory.

ATHT 302 Art and Science of Athletic Training I 3 cr.

This course provides students with opportunities to learn examination, diagnostic, and treatment techniques required to recognize, diagnose, and manage common pathologies found in the lower extremity and pelvis. Students will be instructed and evaluated on the clinical skills needed to perform a comprehensive examination including history, observation techniques, methods of palpation, range of motion assessment, manual muscle techniques, cardiovascular and neurological function assessment, as well as special tests, functional and activity-specific testing, and appropriate referral. Lecture.

ATHT 302L Art and Science of Athletic Training I Lab 0 cr.

This laboratory includes the skills needed to correctly perform the examination, diagnosis, and treatment of conditions of the lower extremity and pelvis. Laboratory.

ATHT 303 Art and Science of Athletic Training II 3 cr.

This second part of the course is designed to provide the students with knowledge and psychomotor skills in evaluation techniques, recognition of common pathologies, and initial management procedures of the upper extremity and spine. Previous learning and clinical skills developed in ATHT 302 are reinforced and built upon during this course. Lecture.

ATHT 303L Art and Science of Athletic Training II Lab 0 cr.

Previous learning and clinical skills developed in ATHTR 302L are reinforced and built upon during this laboratory. This lab includes the skills needed to correctly perform the examination, diagnosis, and treatment of conditions of the upper extremity and spine. Laboratory.

ATHT 306 Therapeutic Exercise and Reconditioning 4 cr.

This course provides students with a solid foundation of the theory and practice associated with the design, implementation, progression, and supervision of rehabilitation programs. Content of this course includes skillful rehabilitation examination, establishment of realistic goals, development of scientifically-supported rehabilitation and reconditioning plans, as well as correction for substitution patterns during rehabilitation performance. Rehabilitation techniques include progression and sequencing, examination and assessment, and application and recording of soft tissue and joint mobilization; range of motion and flexibility exercises; strength and muscle endurance exercises; balance, coordination, and agility activities; plyometric exercises; and functional and activity-specific exercises for return to full participation. Lecture.

ATHT 306L Therapeutic Exercise and Reconditioning Lab 0 cr.

This laboratory includes the performance of rehabilitation techniques including progression and sequencing, examination and assessment, and application and recording of soft tissue and joint mobilization; range of motion and flexibility exercises; strength and muscle endurance exercises; balance, coordination, and agility activities; plyometric exercises; and functional and activity-specific exercises for return to full participation. Laboratory.

ATHT 315 Athletic Training Practicum I 2 cr.

The content of this practicum course includes professional comprehensive review of the anatomical structures and functions of the cervical spine, face, head, and internal organs. The other major component of this course includes the recognition, development and refinement of the evaluative skills, as well as emergency and clinical management of pathologies and conditions of the cervical spine, face, head, and internal organs. Lecture/Lab.

ATHT 315L Athletic Training Practicum I Lab 1 cr.

This clinical course provides students with opportunities, under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer or other licensed health care provider, to apply the knowledge and clinical skills developed and evaluated in the classroom to the athlete/patient populations at local high school and college/university clinical affiliated sites. Students are required to participate in a maximum of 15 hours/week of clinical experiences in accordance with the departmental guidelines. This course is graded on an Honor/Pass/Fail basis. Practicum.

ATHT 316 Athletic Training Practicum II 1 cr.

This course involves the discussion and application of appropriate professional and clinical behaviors in emergency situations as they relate to the patient, as well as emergency, allied health, and medical personnel. Students learn examination and diagnostic techniques needed to recognize and manage emergency situations and conditions. Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) course work is a component of the course; however, pursuit of EMT certification is voluntary. Lecture/Lab.

ATHT 316L Athletic Training Practicum II Lab 2 cr.

This is a continuation of the clinical experiences encountered in Athletic Training Practicum I Lab; however, students now are encouraged to apply knowledge and clinical skills gained from the current and previous semester coursework and clinical practica to further enhance and refine their skills and abilities as an athletic trainer under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer or other licensed health care provider. This course is graded on an Honor/Pass/Fail basis. Practicum.

ATHT 400 Independent Study 1 TO 6 cr.

With the guidance of a faculty member, a student may pursue an in-depth study of a subject area or develop an individual project in an area of interest related to his/her professional goals. Independent Study.

ATHT 400L Emergency Medical Technician Practicum 0 TO 1 cr.

This course provides students with the opportunity to complete the necessary learning, laboratory, and clinical experiences required by the PA Department of Health to become an emergency medical technician. Co/Prerequisites: ATHT 316 or permission of the instructor Laboratory.

ATHT 402L Nutrition and Weight Management Lab 0 cr.

This laboratory requires students to apply information of essential nutrients, their physiological effects on the body, and the methods by which those nutrients may influence function and performance, with body composition analyses, to develop unique, patient-specific comprehensive dietary analyses and nutrition and exercise plans. Laboratory.

ATHT 402W Nutrition and Weight Management 3 cr.

This course requires students to develop a comprehensive understanding of the structure and function of the essential nutrients, their physiological effects on the body, and the methods by which those nutrients may influence function and performance. Students discuss theories of body composition analysis and the application of those analyses to the development of safe, effective, comprehensive and individualized diet and exercise plans. Current and scientific information on eating disorders, disordered eating, weight management, special dietary considerations, and ergogenic aids also is discussed. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ATHT 405 Health and Medicine 3 cr.

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the health conditions and diseases that influence their lives, the lives of those around them, and their patients. Students are required to develop a comprehensive understanding of the physiology of normal organ and system function, pathophysiology of disease, disease processes, appropriate recognition and/or treatment of common disease and health conditions, and determine appropriate referrals. Students also are required to develop clinical competence in the performance of entry-level general medical clinical assessment skills and to participate in general medical clinical experiences with local health care practitioners. Lecture.

ATHT 406W Psychosocial Issues in Healthcare 3 cr.

This course allows students to explore, develop and refine their personal values and ethical foundations as they relate to the psychosocial aspects of healthcare and professional practice. Special emphasis is placed on the psychology of injury and catastrophe, recognition of psychological conditions, counseling and intervention strategies, and the utilization of mental imagery and other psychological skills. Exploration of professionalism, leadership, communication, diversity, inter-relationships between patients, families and the medical community, stress management, burnout, and ethical questions associated with injury, sport and general healthcare also are discussed. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ATHT 407L Physiology of Exercise Lab 0 cr.

This laboratory requires students to actively participate in clinical activities that require the measurement, management, and recognition of the physiological effects of different energy systems, as well as muscular and cardiorespiratory functions. Laboratory.

ATHT 407W Physiology of Exercise 3 cr.

This course prepares students to understand the physiological changes that occur in the body when it undergoes the stress of exercise and physical activity. Students are prepared to become actively involved in the measurement, management, and enhancement of the physiological effects including the creation and utilization of the different energy systems, muscular function and enhancement, and the function and enhancement of the cardiorespiratory system. Students also are expected to apply those advanced physiological concepts in the development of a comprehensive year-round physical conditioning program (according to the standards established by the National Strength and Conditioning Association) to maximally enhance function and performance. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ATHT 410 Athletic Training Practicum III 1 cr.

This course involves discussions of professional behaviors and the application of those professional behaviors in a variety of health care settings, as well as the requirements and opportunities available in emerging practice settings. Course requirements include preparation for advanced graduate education, preparation for the BOC examination, the development of professional interview skills, a professional resume, and cover letter. Further, students will learn to develop and assess the contents of a professional portfolio, as well as complete designated clinical proficiencies which will require the successful and professional application of clinical skills, decision making, and critical thinking. Lecture.

ATHT 410L Athletic Training Practicum III Lab 2 cr.

This clinical course requires students to build upon past clinical experiences and learning to prepare them to assume more responsibility and autonomy while participating in assigned clinical experiences with athletes and patients at local high schools, universities, clinics, and professional sport teams. Under the direct supervision of certified athletic trainers and other licensed health care professionals, students assume even greater responsibility for the total care of the assigned athletes and patients. This increased responsibility includes thorough and professional evaluations, as well as appropriate design and implementation of rehabilitation and reconditioning programs. This course is graded on an Honor/Pass/Fail basis. Practicum.

ATHT 411 Athletic Training Practicum IV 2 cr.

The content of this practicum course includes discussions of advanced professional behaviors and skills with the primary emphasis on the refinement and advancement of professional behaviors and skills. As part of this course, students are required to observe a surgery and give a case study presentation, participate in mock national board examinations that utilize external professional evaluators, as well as a professional portfolio presentations. Advanced knowledge and psychomotor skill opportunities in content areas such as casting, special splinting, appropriate brace and equipment selection, manual therapy techniques, and post-surgical wound management also are included in this course. Lecture/Lab.

ATHT 411L Athletic Training Practicum IV Lab 1 cr.

This is a continuation of the clinical experiences encountered in Athletic Training Practicum III Lab; however, students now are encouraged, while still working under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer and other licensed health care providers, to assume more responsibility and even greater autonomy in preparation for employment and/or advanced graduate education. Students also are encouraged to participate in field experience opportunities in practice arenas in which they may wish to practice in the future. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Practicum.

ATHT 412 Organization and Administration in Athletic Training 3 cr.

This course provides students with information that enhances their abilities to function effectively as professional Athletic Trainers and to enhance their awareness of current administrative, professional, organizational, and legal issues in Athletic Training. Topics include emergency planning, creating budgets, facility design, record keeping, medical billing, professional organizations, and liability. Students examine and discuss concepts in community service work, explore administrative needs of local community groups, and develop administrative response plans, using a service learning model, to address community groups' actual needs. Lecture.

ATHT 414W Medical Perspectives in Athletic Training 2 cr.

This course is designed to expose students to a wide variety of resources and professionals in medicine and other health professions and to assist the students in the development of appreciation for those professions with whom Athletic Trainers work. Medical and other health professionals provide students with advanced learning opportunities and information designed to enhance the knowledge, skills, and interdisciplinary approach to care provided by the sports medicine team. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ATHT 416 Applied Science of Physical Performance 3 cr.

Expanding upon the knowledge and skills developed and evaluated in past coursework, students are required to utilize knowledge and skill to develop and participate in peer teaching activities that include the presentation and analysis of a sport or physical activity. The required components of presentations include biomechanical analysis of skills required for the sport/activity, biomechanical analysis of common chronic and acute injuries associated with the activity, the physiological requirements and rules and regulations of the activity, as well as other special health considerations commonly associated with the activity. Lecture.

ATHT 416L Applied Science of Physical Performance Lab 0 cr.

This laboratory requires students to actively engage and participate in all physical activities presented in the peer teaching units. Laboratory.

ATHT 420 Integrated Training for Performance Enhancement 0 TO 3 cr.

This course, emphasizing performance enhancement, provides students with learning opportunities to develop the necessary knowledge and psychomotor skill to achieve national certification as a Performance Enhancement Specialist (PES), awarded by the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM). This course is designed specifically as an elective for Athletic Training majors. Lecture.

ATHT 420L Integrated Training for Performance Enhancement Lab 0 cr.

This laboratory requires students to apply the knowledge and psychomotor skills learned in the course to the development of appropriate and safe evaluations and programming defined by the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) Performance Enhancement Specialist certification. This laboratory requires students to actively engage and participate in all activities and skills presented in the certification process. Laboratory.

ATHT 421 Applied Therapeutic Exercise 2 cr.

This course assists students in the development of a deeper understanding of therapeutic exercise and reconditioning. The course encompasses case management and advanced manual and rehabilitation skills and encourages students to think critically and solve patient problems more effectively in the delivery of optimal, progressive rehabilitation programs that guide patients safely and succinctly throughout the rehabilitation process. Specific units include gait training, Swiss ball and foam roller rehabilitation, PNF techniques, core stabilization, manual therapy techniques, orthotics evaluation and construction, and age-related rehabilitation concepts. Patients presented throughout the course provide students with opportunities to apply their skills of rehabilitation assessment and planning. Students are required to design a specific rehabilitation program as a final project for the course. Lecture.

ATHT 421L Applied Therapeutic Exercise Lab 0 cr.

This laboratory requires students to demonstrate and instruct the following: gait training; Swiss ball and foam roller rehabilitation; PNF techniques; core stabilization; manual therapy techniques; orthotics evaluation and construction;and apply age-related rehabilitation concepts. Laboratory.

BIOL 101 Introduction to Life's Processes 2 cr.

An emphasis on the fundamental biochemical and cellular concepts required for a solid understanding of life's processes. This information will provide the background for the Anatomy & Physiology and Intro Microbiology courses. Lecture.

BIOL 102 Introduction to Life's Processes Laboratory 1 cr.

Laboratory experiments and demonstrations illustrating biochemical and cellular processes. The lab is designed to accompany the lecture. Laboratory.

BIOL 111 Biology I: Cells, Genetics, Development 4 cr.

Study of living systems at the molecular, cellular, and multicellular levels. An introduction to cell chemistry, cell structure and function, energetics, inheritance, reproduction and development. This course and Biology II provide basic information and concepts necessary to understanding living systems and their interrelationships. Must be taken with BIOL 111L. Lecture. Core Science.

BIOL 111L Biology I Laboratory 0 cr.

Laboratory experiments and demonstrations illustrating cellular and molecular biological principles, energetics, inheritance, reproduction, and development. Must be taken with BIOL 111. Laboratory.

BIOL 112 Biology II: Diversity, Ecology, Evolution 4 cr.

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of living systems at the organismal, community, and ecosystem levels by surveying diversity in the five kingdoms, ecology and evolution. BIOL 111 is not a prerequisite to BIOL 112. Must be taken with BIOL 112L. Lecture. Core Science.

BIOL 112L Biology II Laboratory 0 cr.

Laboratory experiments and demonstrations which illustrate animal and plant diversity, ecological principles, and evolutionary concepts. Must be taken with BIOL 112. Laboratory.

BIOL 115 Advanced General Biology I 4 cr.

This course investigates the biological world at the level of biomolecules and cells. It also provides an introduction to the mechanisms of inheritance, how genes work, and the process of development - the progression from fertilized egg to adult. Information and concepts essential to understanding the biological sciences are integrated with the process and excitement of scientific discovery. BIOL 115 is not a prerequisite for BIOL 117 or BIOL 112. This course is restricted to Biology and CERE majors. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Must be taken with BIOL 115L. Lecture. Core Science.

BIOL 115L Advanced General Biology Laboratory I 0 cr.

Laboratory experiments in cellular and molecular biology, genetics, and development focusing on the process of scientific discovery. Experiments, data analysis, and laboratory reports are emphasized. This course is restricted to Biology and CERE majors. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Must be taken with BIOL 115. Laboratory.

BIOL 117 Advanced General Biology II 4 cr.

This course investigates living systems at the organismal, community, and ecosystem levels. Included is a survey of the diversity of life, ecology, and evolution. The information and concepts essential to understanding the biological sciences are integrated with the process and excitement of scientific discovery. This course is restricted to Biology and CERE majors. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Must be taken with BiOL 117L. Lecture. Core Science.

BIOL 117L Advanced General Biology Laboratory II 0 cr.

Laboratory experiments and demonstrations illustrating the diversity of life, ecological principles, and evolutionary concepts. Experiments, data analysis, and laboratory reports are emphasized. This course is restricted to Biology and CERE majors. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Must be taken with BIOL 117. Laboratory.

BIOL 203 Introductory Microbiology 3 cr.

Introduction to microorganisms, their morphology, metabolism, ecology, and cultural characteristics, with emphasis on their interaction with other organisms, including man. Principles of medical and health related aspects of microbiology, immunology and animal virology are presented. This course is restricted to health sciences and nursing students only. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 101/102 or 111/111L. Lecture.

BIOL 204 Introductory Microbiology Laboratory 1 cr.

Prerequisite: BIOL 203 (or concurrent registration). Laboratory.

BIOL 207 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 cr.

This course is for aspiring health care workers. It provides a solid foundation in normal human anatomy and physiology, then helps the student to integrate the knowledge with exposure to pathological conditions and clinical applications. The focus during this first semester is on body organization, movement and control mechanisms. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 101/102 or 111/111L. Lecture.

BIOL 208 Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory 1 cr.

Laboratory exercises include both microscopic and gross examination of human anatomy, studies of physiological processes and exposure to basic clinically significant procedures. The hands-on approach in the laboratory provides an opportunity for students to experience and better understand the topics covered in lecture. Prerequisite: BIOL 207 (or concurrent registration). Laboratory.

BIOL 209 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 cr.

Continuation of BIOL 207, emphasizing the mechanisms employed to maintain the body. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 207/208 or permission of instructor. Lecture.

BIOL 210 Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory 1 cr.

Continuation of BIOL 208. Laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 209 (or concurrent registration). Laboratory.

BIOL 212 Cell and Molecular Biology 4 cr.

An introduction to biological macromolecule structure, macromolecular synthesis and the control of gene expression. Techniques for purifying proteins and manipulating nucleic acids will be emphasized. Also this course will include examinations of cellular organelles, nuclear and chromatin structure, membrane systems, protein trafficking, the cytoskeleton, the cell cycle, cell-cell communication and extracellular matrices. Prerequisites: Must have a C or better in BIOL 111/112 (or BIOL 115/117) and BIOL 111L/112L (or BIOL 115L/117L:) and a C or better in CHEM 121, 122. Lecture.

BIOL 250 Genetics 3 cr.

This course is a survey of the subject of genetic analysis in biology. A problem solving approach is used to demonstrate the principles of genetics. Topics include classical Mendelian genetics, chromosomal inheritance, human genetic disease, population genetics, and gene expression. Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 212 or permission of instructor. Lecture.

BIOL 313 Developmental Biology 3 cr.

The study of the progression through time and space from a single cell, the fertilized egg, to a complex multicellular organism. The powerful tools of molecular and cellular biology have linked the fields of embryology, morphology, genetics, and evolutionary biology to reveal how cells, tissues, organs, and organisms develop. This course explores the processes of morphogenesis, differentiation, pattern formation, growth, and reproduction at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels to provide a current overview of development in a wide variety of organisms. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 212. Lecture.

BIOL 315 Mammalian Physiology 3 cr.

Examination of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mammalian body function, including consideration of the basic components of biological control systems and the manner in which various tissues and organ systems contribute toward the maintenance of physiological homeostasis in health and disease. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 212 or permission of instructor. Lecture.

BIOL 316 Comparative and Environmental Physiology 3 cr.

This course focuses on the diversity of physiological mechanisms that different animals employ, including the high level of physiological and biochemical adaptation and specialization found in animals that live in diverse and challenging environments, or that possess other exceptional physiological abilities. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 212 or permission of instructor. Lecture.

BIOL 319 General Microbiology 3 cr.

Survey of the microbial world, metabolism, biosynthesis, regulation, growth, structure and function. Also included is an introduction to the fundamentals of immunology and virology. Recommended for students majoring in biology and post-baccalaureate students. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 212. Lecture.

BIOL 322 Animal Behavior 3 cr.

An evolutionary approach to study the behavior of animals. Using the Darwinian Framework, one can understand basic life history events such as natal dispersal or seasonal migrations. Moreover intra-sexual selection and inter-sexual selection (mate choice) will be examined in several taxa. Finally intra-specific variation (or culture) will be explored among several animal populations, with special emphasis on social behavior. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 111/112 and BIOL 111L/112L. Lecture.

BIOL 335 Vertebrate Anatomy, Development and Evolution 3 cr.

This course emphasizes comparative development, functional anatomy and macroevolution of vertebrate body plans. Topics include the diversity and phylogenetic history of fossil and local forms, development and comparative embryology of each organ system, and comparative functional anatomy of the major clades of living vertebrates within an evolutionary framework. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 212. Lecture/Lab.

BIOL 340W Evolution 3 cr.

Evolution is the single most important concept uniting the many fields of biology. This course covers the theory of evolution and the various levels at which evolution works in living systems. Topics to be addressed include evolutionary genetics (including molecular evolution), adaptation and natural selection, evolution and diversity (including phylogeny reconstruction), and paleobiology and macroevolution. Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 212; a genetics course is strongly recommended. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

BIOL 370W Lab I: Experimental Biology 4 cr.

This junior level lab course sequence is designed to provide students with a multidisciplinary lab that reflects the integration among different disciplines in the broad areas of cellular and molecular biology. The course emphasizes techniques and approaches in the molecular, biochemical, and cellular biology of organisms from bacteria to mammals. Included are an introduction to research skills (computer use, library resources), characterizations and manipulations of cellular macromolecules including proteins and nucleic acids, and microscopy. Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 212. Laboratory. University Core Writing Intens.

BIOL 371W Lab II: Cell and Molecular Biology 4 cr.

The course builds on BIOL 370W through investigative labs in cellular and molecular biology including cell culture, genetic mapping, constructing transgenic organisms, microscopy of cellular structures. Prerequisite: BIOL 370W. Laboratory. University Core Writing Intens.

BIOL 372W Lab III: Cell and Systems Physiology 4 cr.

This junior level lab course sequence is designed to provide students with a multidisciplinary lab that reflects the integration among different disciplines in the broad areas of cellular and molecular biology. The course emphasizes techniques and approaches in the molecular, biochemical, and cellular biology of organisms from bacteria to mammals. Included are an introduction to research skills (computer use, library resources), characterizations and manipulations of cellular macromolecules including proteins and nucleic acids, and microscopy. Prerequisite: BIOL 370W. Laboratory. University Core Writing Intens.

BIOL 373W Lab IV: Microbiology 4 cr.

This course builds on BIOL 370W through investigative labs in microbial physiology, ecology and genetics. This laboratory also includes an independent research project designed and conducted by each student. Prerequisite: BIOL 370W. Laboratory. University Core Writing Intens.

BIOL 374W Lab V: Physiology and Molecular Techniques for Physical Therapy 4 cr.

This laboratory course focuses on how the body works in health and disease and the molecular techniques that relate to disease detection. Investigative experiments with organisms from bacteria to mammals will be performed, with an emphasis on human physiology. In addition, techniques such as polymerase chain reaction, molecular cloning, and DNA sequencing will be included. Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 212. Laboratory. University Core Writing Intens.

BIOL 376W Lab VI: Microscopy 4 cr.

Microscopy can provide a unique glimpse at cell morphology and intracellular form and function. The purpose of this course is to introduce the theory and practice in the various types of microscopy including light (bright field, dark field, phase contrast, differential interference contrast), fluorescence, and confocal scanning laser, as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. It focuses on experimental design where microscopy provides the answer (conceptualization), determination of microscope/technique that will provide the answer (instrumentation), and producing the micrograph with digital photography and image processing (documentation). Prerequisite: BIOL 370W. Laboratory. University Core Writing Intens.

BIOL 391 Biology Experience in China 3 cr.

This course provides an in-depth three week scientific and cultural experience in China facilitated through Duquesne University and the Chinese Association of Science and Technology. Students will travel to a variety of locations in China and work in seminars or small groups with the opportunity to (1)communicate orally and in writing in topics such as environmental science and pollution abatement: (2)acquire appropriate learning skills for collective laboratory work: (3)become familiar with the Chinese scientific issues through actively participating in scientific presentations. Students must participate in pre-trip seminars during the prior spring semester, in the three- week trip (typically in August) including all activities during the trip, in the writing of reports to include in the trip summary document, and in a post-trip presentation to the public. This course is for undergraduate students in biology. Pass/Fail. Field Work.

BIOL 394 Undergraduate Biology Seminar 1 cr.

Discussion of current issues and scientific literature in the Biological Sciences. Format includes student presentations, faculty seminars or invited speakers. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. May be taken a total of two times for credit (in combination with honors seminar, BIOL 414H). Seminar.

BIOL 395 Special Topics: Biology 1 TO 3 cr.

Treatment of topics of current or special interest in biology. Lecture/Lab, Lecture, Laboratory.

BIOL 396 Special Topics: Biology II 1 TO 3 cr.

Treatment of topics of current or special interest in biology. Lecture, Lecture/Lab, Laboratory.

BIOL 397 Undergraduate Biology Thesis 2 cr.

A written thesis and presentation to be based on research that was conducted under the mentorship of a faculty member in the department of Biological Sciences. Prerequisite: permission of a faculty member. Thesis.

BIOL 398 Undergraduate Research 1 TO 3 cr.

Opportunity for selected students to work in the laboratory on research problems under the direction of a faculty member. Registration by permission of the instructor. Pass/Fail only. Laboratory.

BIOL 399 Undergraduate Research 1 TO 3 cr.

Opportunity for selected students to work in the laboratory on research problems under the direction of a faculty member. Registration by permission of instructor. Pass/Fail only. Laboratory.

BIOL 405 Microbial Genetics 3 cr.

A course providing the fundamentals to the rapidly growing field of microbial genetics. Emphasis is on gene structure and function. Areas to be discussed are DNA replication, control of gene expression, recombination, transformation, conjugation, transduction, transposition, genetic fine structure and colinearity, mapping methods, mutation, DNA repair, plasmids and their properties. Genetic engineering and gene cloning are described. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 212. Lecture.

BIOL 414H Honors Biology Seminar 1 cr.

Discussion of current issues and scientific literature in the Biological Sciences. Format includes student presentations, faculty seminars, or invited speakers. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance into the honors program in Biology. 1 hour seminar per week. May be taken a total of two times for credit (in combination with undergraduate seminar BIOL 394). Seminar.

BIOL 415H Honors Thesis 2 cr.

A written honors thesis to be based on research that was conducted under the mentorship of faculty in the Department of Biological Sciences. Also includes a public presentation of the thesis research. Prerequisite: 1-4 credits of BIOL 416H and application and acceptance into the honors program in biology. Lecture.

BIOL 416H Honors Biology Research 1 TO 3 cr.

Laboratory research under the direction of a faculty mentor in the Department of Biological Sciences. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance into the honors program in Biology. May be taken more than once for a maximum of 6 credits (in combination with undergraduate research, BIOL 398, 399). Laboratory.

BIOL 417 Invertebrate Biology and Biotechnology 3 cr.

This course will survey the biology and phylogenetics of invertebrate organisms from protozoa through invertebrate chordates. An emphasis will be placed on phylogenetic relationships of these organisms, in particular the adaptations and apomorphies that identify them as unique taxa. A formal understanding of modern phylogenetic techniques will be developed. A collection of invertebrates is required as part of the course. Approximately 15% of the course will be devoted to the uses of invertebrates in biotechnology (especially Drosophila and C. elegans) and the use of biotechnology for the control of invertebrate pests of plants and animals. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 212. Lecture.

BIOL 424 Immunology 3 cr.

A course in the fundamental mechanisms of the immune system with applications in basic research, medicine and public health. Topics include the mechanisms of induction, regulation, and expression of the cellular and humoral immune responses, immunochemistry, antigen-antibody reactions, immunogenetics, immunopathologies, and immunodeficiencies. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 212. Lecture.

BIOL 426 Pathogenic Microbiology 3 cr.

Study of the infectious agents of human disease with emphasis on host-parasite relationships, unique aspects of microbial activities and organization, metabolism, regulation and genetics which contribute to pathogenicity, including identification, and principles of prevention, treatment, and laboratory diagnosis. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 212. Lecture.

BIOL 427W Microbial Ecology 3 cr.

In this course the interaction of microorganisms, primarily prokaryotes, with each other, plants, animals, and fungi, and the environment is explored. The course takes a systematic approach, examining these interactions at the ecosystem, organismal, subcellular, and historical level. Topics include microbial primary production and photosynthesis, biogeochemical cycling, the structure of microbial communities, modeling, symbiosis, and microbial evolution. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 212, BIOL 319, and CHEM 212 or permission of the instructor. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

BIOL 429 Microbial Physiology 3 cr.

This course focuses on bacterial structure and function. Topics covered include mechanisms of protein secretion, structure, and synthesis of the cell envelope, and examination of the organelles associated with motility. The role of the features examined in terms of bacterial pathogenesis will be emphasized. Energy metabolism including chemoorganotrophy, chemolithotrophy, and phototrophy will also be covered. Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 212 and organic chemistry or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

BIOL 432W Applied and Environmental Microbiology 3 cr.

This course takes an in-depth look at microbial biogeochemical cycling and the application of microbial processes (both prokaryotic and eukaryotic) for biotechnology and bioremediation. Topics include biogeochemistry, the design and application of genetically engineered microbes (GEMS), natural attenuation, fermentation, and water treatment, in addition to current issues in environmental science. Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 212, BIOL 319 and CHEM 212 or 212H or permission of the instructor. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

BIOL 438 Environmental Biology 3 cr.

The course provides an overview of life and the environment. Basic biological principles are examined in the context of the impact humans have on the biosphere. Topics include:ecological principles at the population, community and ecosystems levels; climate; biogeochemical cycles; human population growth; sources and effects of pollution; deforestation and habitat loss; loss of species richness; extinction; global warming; disease; biomarkers; biotechnology; and bio- remediation. The course is appropriate for science majors and for nonmajors with a strong science background. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/112 or consent of instructor. Lecture.

BIOL 444 Plant Biology, Biotechnology, and Genomics 3 cr.

This course is a merger of basic plant biology, molecular biology, and biotechnology. In it, we will discuss plant biochemistry, physiology, genetics, and development. The emphasis is placed upon linking basic plant systems to current research problems and developments in biotechnology and genomics. Typical topics will include applications of plant molecular biology to understand cellular structure and function, genomics, developmental genetics, and methods to develop tools for plant biotechnology. The course will also discuss the issue of plant biology as it pertains to the world economics and food production. Prerequisites: BIOL 370W and BIOL 250, BIOL 468 (basic course in genetics, minimum grade C) or CHEM 401 or 402 (basic course in biochemistry). Lecture.

BIOL 457W Reproductive Physiology 3 cr.

This course offers a broad overview of mammalian reproductive physiology. The major emphasis will be on human/primate biology, but other mammalian species will be included for comparison. The application of modern techniques of cellular and molecular biology to answer central questions of reproductive physiology will be explored in more detail. Prerequisite: BIOL 315 or BIOL 316 or comparable and permission of the instructor. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

BIOL 460 Endocrinology 3 cr.

This advanced integrative physiology course investigates the role of the endocrine system in coordination and regulation of body activities. Topics include homeostasis, reflex arcs, hormone synthesis, hormone action and signal transduction, hypothalamic/pituitary axis, regulation of salt, mineral and water balances, regulation of energy metabolism, reproduction, growth and development. This course is appropriate for Biology and Biochemistry majors interested in Physiology, as well as for pre-health professions students. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 212. Lecture.

BIOL 466 Terrestrial Field Biology 3 cr.

This applied ecology course is designed to present an overview of field and laboratory methods used by ecologists to describe and analyze plant and animal aggregations and their environments. The course focus is on the principles and practice of various ecological procedures with explanation of how to collect, record and analyze data. The course reviews the basic concepts of ecology that are needed to understand the various methods and their significance. The course material is presented as a combination of lecture, laboratory and field sessions. Prerequisites: There are no specific course prerequisites; however, students should have knowledge of basic biology, chemistry and fundamental algebra. Lecture/Lab.

BIOL 467 Genomics 3 cr.

This course examines the structure, function, and evolution of genomes, including both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Topics covered will include genome sequencing methods and analysis, gene expression, chromosome structure, proteomics, bioinformatics and genome evolution. Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 212 and BIOL 250 (or BIOL 405 or BIOL 468), or CHEM 402. Lecture.

BIOL 468 Human Genetics 3 cr.

This is an advanced course in human genetics focusing on principles of inheritance, structure and function of the human genome, genetic mapping of diseases, and patterns of human genetic diversity. We will examine both theoretical concepts as well as practical applications to a variety of fields. The emphasis of applications will be on the logic of the approach rather than on technical experimental details. Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 212, or instructor approval. Lecture.

BIOL 475 Neurobiology 3 cr.

This course will survey topics found in the science of neurobiology. Neurobiology is the study of the nervous system, its development, its function and its diseases. Topics will include evolution and development of the nervous system, electrophysiology of neurons, human neuroanatomy, anatomy and functioning of the sensory systems and molecular genetics of the nervous system. The focus of the course is on how a scientist discovers the inner workings of the brain. A vast array of living organisms have brains. Science has shown that the study of simple brains can tell us a great deal about how all brains function, including human brains. As such, in this class, we will study aspects of the neurobiology of many different organisms. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 212 or permission of instructor. Lecture.

BIOL 480 Readings in Biology I 1 cr.

Discussion and critical evaluation by faculty and students of significant papers from the recent research literature. Readings.

BIOL 481 Readings in Biology II 1 cr.

Discussion and critical evaluation by faculty and students of significant papers from the recent research literature. Readings.

BIOL 490 Seminar 1 cr.

Students attend and participate in weekly departmental research presentations and demonstrations by biological scientists from the Department of Biological Sciences, field stations, biotechnology laboratories, and other universities. May only be taken once for credit. Pass/Fail. Seminar.

BIOL 492W Stream Field Biology 3 cr.

This course is the study of the functional relationships and productivity of fresh water streams as they are affected by their physical, chemical and biotic environment. The course material is presented as a combination of lecture, laboratory and field sessions. Prerequisites: There are no specific course prerequisites; however, students should have knowledge of basic biology, chemistry and fundamental algebra. Lecture/Lab. University Core Writing Intens.

BIOL 494 Environmental Sampling and Analysis 3 cr.

Explores the fundamentals of sample collection from experimental design and chain of custody, to methods used for obtaining environmental samples from air, water, and sediment in addition to biological sampling. The class lectures are augmented with trips to field research stations and a river excursion with RiverQuest to obtain environmental samples. Sample analysis includes microscopy and spectrometry, as well as biological and molecular techniques. Prerequisites: Biology 111/111L, 112/112L; CHEM 121/121L, 122/122L; MATH 225 or enrollment in graduate program. Field Work, Laboratory, Lecture.

BIOL 530W DNA Methods in Population Genetics 4 cr.

This combined laboratory and lecture course examines the biology underlying the most common genetic marker systems used in the forensic community. The basics of population genetics and DNA analysis methodologies will be covered, including the CODIS database. Techniques include extraction protocols, amplication of DNA, methods for labeling DNA, and ultimately the construction of a genetic profile using an ABI 3100 Avant Genetic Analyzer. Mitochondrial DNA, the Y-chromosome, and Amelogenin, the most commonly used gender identification locus, will also be experimentally explored. Prerequisites: BIOL 579 and permission of the instructor if not in Forensic track. Lecture/Lab. University Core Writing Intens.

BIOL 579 Forensic Molecular Biology 3 cr.

This combined graduate level laboratory and lecture class is a pre-requisite for DNA Methods & Population Genetics (BIOL 530W), and is a required course for the Forensic Science and Law Program. This course was designed to help students develop a number of practical skills and perform techniques routinely used in modern biological research. This course covers the major protein and immunochemistry techniques and assays as well as recombinant DNA techniques. The evolution of these techniques and their relevance to the forensic community will be emphasized. Although this class is designed for FSL students, non-FSL students may register with approval of instructor. Lecture and laboratory. Corequisite: BIOL 568 Human Genetics. This course covers the major protein and DNA molecule marker systems and techniques currently used in biological research laboratories. Lecture/Lab.

BLAW 251 Business Law 3 cr.

Business Law is an introductory course exploring the nature of laws, its sources, and its relation to society, government and business. The course focuses on the traditional business law topics - property, contracts, torts, agency, business organizations and government regulation. Lecture.

BLAW 351 Fundamentals of Logic 3 cr.

"Logic deals with argumentation. It aims to provide the means for evaluating arguments so that we make effective ones ourselves in thought, speaking, and writing, and we can analyze the arguments of others. This course includes an analysis of valid reasoning, logical fallacies, types of definitions, arguments in ordinary discourse, and the formal logic of inferences. Study of logic should benefit our critical thinking and writing. Logic is central in the study and practice of law, thus is an excellent decision-making foundation for students interested in legal studies and possible pursuing a career in the legal profession. And, logic is fascinating in its own right. In addition, this course offers a LSAT tutorial series to prepare students to take the law school admissions examination. These tutorials test the students' ability to determine main points of arguments, to apply logic to abstract concepts, to find relevant information within a text and to analyze and evaluate arguments. Lecture.

BLAW 353W Contracts 3 cr.

The fundamental concepts of the law of contracts are examined to provide the student with an understanding of the common law system regarding formation, performance, third party rights, ethics, discharge and remedies. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

BLAW 354 Commercial Transactions 3 cr.

Study of th eprovisions of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) with reference to the nature and legality of the sale of goods, the formality of sale contracts, transfer of title of goods, warranties, nature and kinds of commercial paper, requisites and meaning of negotiability, methods of transfer and secured transactions. Lecture.

BLAW 355 Law of Business Organization 3 cr.

This is a course which focuses on various laws pertaining to the creation and termination of corporations, franchises, partnerships, agency and other business entities. Lecture.

BLAW 355W Law of Business Organization 3 cr.

This is a course which focuses on various laws pertaining to the creation and termination of corporations, franchises, partnerships, agency and other business entities. Lecture.

BLAW 454 Law of International Commercial Transactions 3 cr.

This course provides the student with an overall perspective of the basic legal problems involved in doing business with and in other countries. Topics covered include an introduction to foreign legal systems; study of various forms of business organization; legal problems involved in letters of credit, insurance, risk of loss, antitrust aspects of the sale of goods; forms of dispute settlement, and the problems of enforcing judgments in and against foreign countries. Lecture.

BLAW 456 Legal Aspects of Human Resources 3 cr.

Legal Aspects of Human Resources is a survey course of state and federal laws that influence the legal environment of personnel and human resource management. Lecture.

BLAW 470 Legal Environment of Sports 3 cr.

This course will cover regulation in the sports industry including NCAA regulations, collective bargaining and codes of industry conduct. In addition, royalties, rights and licensing issues will be covered. Lecture.

BUAD 103 Gateway to Business 2 cr.

Introduction to Business provides an overview of the curriculum offerings and organization of the School of Business Administration. In addition to detailing the School's areas of concentration, the course will introduce the student to the School's advisement process, student organizations, study abroad opportunities, and career services. Current business concepts and trends will be discussed. The student will be expected to use technology as a communication medium throughout the course. Lecture.

BUAD 103L Gateway to Business Lab 0 cr.

An integral part of the Gateway to Business course is the corresponding simulation lab. Each student is required to sign up for a lab in addition to the lecture class. Students will use the lab to purchase and complete four (4) graded simulations related to the coursework: Lemonade Tycoon; Universal Car Rental; Back Bay Battery and Everest. The Everest simulation is a team building exercise so students will be assigned to teams to complete the project; the other simulations will be done individually. Laboratory.

BUAD 182 Decision Tools/Business Analytics 3 cr.

This course is the first of a 3-course sequence (with QSIS 281 and 284) introducing students to business analytics, which use computer-based tools and quantitative techniques to provide managers with a better understanding of markets, investments and other business issues. This course focuses on the tools, primarily spreadsheet applications, that allow business managers to analyze problems, build decision models, identify patterns and scenarios, and present solutions. The tools are taught with a method designed to develop logic skills and analytic thinking. Lecture.

BUAD 352 Professional Development Year III - Spring 0 cr.

The third year of the PDC is where you focus on gaining hands-on experience and learn to apply the skills you gained in the first two years. Other.

BUAD 401 Business & Administration Internship 1 TO 6 cr.

This internship provides the student with a professional work experience in an organizational environment. It is an extension of the curriculum and provides meaningful experience related to the student's area of concentration. Internship responsibilities must be approved in advance by a faculty sponsor. The student is supervised within the work setting and also by a faculty member from the School of Business Administration. Internships are available to students in all business concentrations. Grading is Pass-Fail. Prerequisites: Junior standing and an overall QPA of 2.5 or better; completion of at least 15 credits at Duquesne University. Offered every semester. Completion of 6 credits in major area. Internship.

BUAD 402 Internship International 1 cr.

This is a special course limited to international students. Internship.

BUAD 403 Service Learning Internship 0 TO 3 cr.

This internship course is a unique opportunity for junior- and senior-level business students to understand the role of business in improving the community and creating a better society, while also providing in-depth, professional work experience in an organizational environment. Toward this end, students will apply business principles to the solution of business problems facing small businesses, not-for-profits, minority- and women-owned businesses, NGOs, and other in-need organizations within the community. In a more general sense, the primary objective of the course is to provide a forum within which business students can apply and reinforce their business knowledge in a 'real world' environment, thus gaining valuable project and business experience that can be included on a resume, while also providing an important service to the community. Internship.

BUAD 452 Professional Development Program 0 cr.

The Professional Development Program is a four-year program required of business students. This program is designed to augment the theoretical knowledge obtained in the classroom by enhancing the skill sets that are critical for starting a business career upon graduation. Lecture.

BUAD 490 Special Topics 0 TO 3 cr.

These courses cover new and noteworthy topics. The courses may eventually become permanent offerings in different areas. Lecture.

CEBS 100 Introduction to Behavioral Science 3 cr.

This course is an introduction to and survey of the science of human behavior and mental processes. There will be a primary emphasis on the application of scientific reasoning and the empirical method to the study of topics such as learning and cognition, the biological bases of behavior, personality, motivation and emotion, social and group dynamics, developmental processes, and behavioral disorders and treatment. Online.

CEBS 200W Research and Evaluation in Behavioral Science 3 cr.

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of quantitative behavioral research including the identification and selection of testable research problems, developing hypotheses, research designs, data analysis, writing research papers in the APA style, and ethical conduct in research. Students will learn to critically evaluate published journal articles including understanding potential sources of bias. Online. University Core Writing Intens.

CEBS 300 Social Environment and Human Behavior 3 cr.

This course outlines how people's behavior, feelings, and thoughts are influenced or determined by their social environment. Topics include person perception, prejudice, discrimination and diversity, the nature of attitudes and social cognition, group dynamics and behavior, and interpersonal relations. Online.

CEBS 301 Science of Positive Psychology 3 cr.

This course covers the basics of the new science of positive psychology and reviews empirical evidence of successful positive psychology interventions. The focus will be on human strengths rather than weaknesses, and on understanding human happiness, well-being, flow, optimism and flourishing. Students will gain practical skills in applying positive psychology exercises to their own lives. Online.

CEBS 302 Life Span Development 3 cr.

This course focuses on the theoretical and empirical models that direct development research on adulthood and old age. A primary emphasis will be placed on reviewing the empirical literature concerning developmental changes in cognition, motivation and emotion. Online.

CEBS 303 Community Psychology 3 cr.

The theory and practice of community psychology goes beyond an individual focus and integrates social, cultural, economic, political, environmental, and international influences to promote positive change, health, and empowerment at individual and systemic levels. This course will provide students with an overview to the field of community psychology. Students will integrate the scientific study of social problems and their solutions with practical applications. Students will learn about community-based research and how research findings can be used to address social problems. Online.

CEBS 400 Disorders of Human Behavior 3 cr.

This course is an overview of psychopathology and abnormal behavior among adults. The focus will be on theoretical models of abnormal behavior as they relate to the definition, etiology, and treatment of mental disorders. Diagnostic classification, behavioral, and biological features of the major syndromes of psychopathology will be discussed. Online.

CEBS 401 Health and Human Behavior 3 cr.

This course is concerned with how behavior influences the development of and recovery from disease. The course will introduce the biopsychosocial model and review existing behavioral, psychosocial, and epidemiological data on the relationship between behavior and disease, and how behavior, emotion, and cognition can influence the disease process. Online.

CEBS 499W Integrated Capstone in Behavioral Science 3 cr.

This course provides students with an integrative learning experience where they will create, develop and present a paper drawing on current behavioral science research. This class will include the process of culling research down to what is valuable teaching students what is or isn't relevant to the issue at hand. Students will review scholarly research to support an applied perspective and conclude how the research informs them about the future. Lecture, Online. University Core Writing Intens.

CECT 200 Introduction to Computer Systems Technology 3 cr.

The course is designed so that students can study the components of computing systems common to most computer architectures. In particular, this class will cover hardware organization, the Internet, computer programming, limits of computing, and graphics. Online.

CECT 201 Introduction to Information Systems Design 3 cr.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of system analysis and design. Students will learn the language of data modeling and the processes involved in iterative design that allows users to improve the functionality of a computer system. Online.

CECT 300 Information Technology for Modern Organizations 3 cr.

This course acquaints the student with computer hardware and software resources required to function effectively in today's organizations. Students will also receive hands-on practice with software applications useful for organizational leadership. They will also examine the impact of the information highway on organizational operations. Online.

CECT 301 Introduction to Programming 3 cr.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to program design process and programming skills. It will not assume prior programming experience. Material covered will include algorithms, and problem solving using a high-level programming language such as C, data structures, including lists, trees, graphs, and array. Online.

CECT 302 Project Management and Execution 3 cr.

This course will enable students to understand what it takes for successful project execution and change management. They will focus on the PMI Project Management body of knowledge across all phases of a project and will learn the common processes, tools, software, techniques and theories that are needed to manage projects. Online.

CECT 303 Technical Communication and Writing 3 cr.

IST professionals need to have the ability to translate highly technical information into documents, reports and other communication. Effective technical communication and writing begins with understanding the audience (including non-technical) and purpose. This course will detail planning, structuring, writing, editing, and usability testing. Students will learn to create effective documents including instructions, descriptions, processes and reports. Online.

CECT 304 Web Technologies and Applications I 3 cr.

This course will give students an understanding and introduction of tools and services available on the Web and the different technologies used. It will cover areas such as the history of the web, search engines, blogging, social media, and other powerful tools that have emerged on the web to help you get important work done. At the end of the course, students will be able to create and manage a simple web site. Online.

CECT 305 Web Technologies and Applications II 3 cr.

This course follows on from Applications I and provides further exposure to various web development software suites and the creation of internet multimedia. Topics will include the creation of sophisticated web sites and applets, internet multimedia file types, acquisition and streaming audio/video and graphics animation plug-in programs, multimedia and distance learning and other related topics. Online.

CECT 401 Problem Solving with Information Systems and Technology 3 cr.

This course builds on previous knowledge of information systems and technology to explain a scientific approach to problem solving. It will focus on addressing Information Systems and Technology related problems, and learning the methods, concepts and techniques needed to solve organizational problems by. Students will learn how to get the maximum business impact out of the implementation of an information system, as well as how to reliably implement and integrate technology into organizational systems. Online.

CECT 402 Database Management Systems 3 cr.

This course explores the capabilities and basic architecture of a database and its role as an instrument of competitive advantage. The ability to operate and use a computer in the tasks of creation, retrieval, and maintenance of data files will be covered. Through the use of hands-on tasks, case studies, and projects, students will apply the theories discussed to practical applications. Current microcomputer relational databases will be reviewed, and direct experience with one will be obtained. In addition, the ability to extract and organize data to better understand operational trends will be discussed. Topics include controls, objects, events, variables, multiple forms, procedures, functions, arrays; file I/O, error handling, and menus. Online.

CECT 403 Computer and Network Security 3 cr.

This course will provide practical knowledge on how to set up a secure and effective computer working environment. Students will learn the difference between electronic and cyber security. The general rules for obtaining and securing information and network systems will be discussed. Security breaches and the types of systems that are most vulnerable will also be explored. The basics of cryptography such as key management and digital signatures, etc. and network security such as PKI, IPSec, intrusion detection and prevention will also be examined. Online.

CECT 404 Managing Information Systems Strategically 3 cr.

This course acquaints the student with the computer hardware and software resources required to function effectively in today's organizations. Students will also receive "hands-on" practice with software applications useful for organizational leadership. They will also examine the impact of the information highway on organizational operations. Online.

CECT 425W Electronic Communication 3 cr.

Introduces the world of electronic communications as a globally networked age. The student will be exposed to the vast array of online information resources available through the internet. Additionally, the ability to communicate electronically in various mediums (texts, sounds, images) will be discussed The areas covered will include the use of network communications in the developing arena of electronic data interchange and commerce, Virtual Private Networks, intranets, and remote access to data. Students will have to opportunity to work with software tools used in navigating the ¿net.¿ The implications of electronic communications use, such as security, privacy, backup, and redundancy, as well as future trends will be discussed. Online. University Core Writing Intens.

CECT 450 Network Operating Systems 3 cr.

This course is an introduction to network operating systems (NOS) emphasizing the various services provided by an NOS including file services, application services, mail and messaging, distributed authentication and database functions. The major emphasis will be on the Windows NT and UNIX operating systems, although Novell Netware NOS and OS/2 will be discussed, as well. Students completing this course should be able to evaluate various network operating systems in specific application contexts and provide justifications for the sizing and selection of a particular NOS including budgeting for capital and operating expenses. Online.

CECT 470 Multimedia Technology 3 cr.

Provides an overview of multimedia technologies and their uses. Graphical User Interfaces, multimedia computer selections, scanners, sound digitizing, video and still cameras, CD-ROMs, multimedia and networking, multimedia and distance learning, digital video, graphics, sound and animation are examined. Students will create home pages on the World Wide Web as a means of integrating course concepts. Online.

CECT 495W Leadership Trends- Information Technology 3 cr.

Integrates the knowledge and abilities acquired within the entire program to allow the student to develop strategic decisions in the application of information technology. This capstone course will investigate the use and application of technology into the business entity. Through case studies and best practice examples, students will analyze the synergies and advantages to be gained from successful implementations of technology. Current trends within the information technology industry and their relation to business success will be discussed. Students will produce a comprehensive case analysis to demonstrate their understanding and proficiency in the area of strategic application of information technologies. Online. University Core Writing Intens.

CEHL 100 First Strike:Cruelty to Animals and Interpersonal Violence 3 cr.

During the past two decades, the relationship between cruelty to animals and interpersonal violence--once a subject of common anecdotal knowledge--has been substantiated by a significant body of work in social science. Participants in this course will gain a fundamental knowledge of this connection (as explained by sociologists, psychologists, law enforcement professionals, and others); examine both qualitative and quantitative studies and case histories of the correlation between cruelty to animals, child abuse, domestic violence, elder abuse, and teen violence; and explore the broad terrain of community level partnerships involving humane societies, social service providers, and law enforcement agencies. Participants will learn how to recognize the at-risk or offending populations. The course is designed for educators, investigators, animal care and control personnel, law enforcement officials, protective service professionals, and other anti-violence workers. Online.

CEHL 110 Introduction to Nonprofit Leadership 3 cr.

This course will provide an overview of the nonprofit sector and will examine the various elements and organizations that comprise that group of institutions, along with understanding the reach and breadth of the nonprofit community. Students will learn about the history of the sector and delve into the differences and similarities between nonprofits representing areas including health and human service, arts and culture, education, religion, civic and community groups, funding organizations. Lecture.

CEHL 205 Fundraising Basics for Nonprofits 3 cr.

The ability of a nonprofit organization to provide programs and services to meet its mission is largely driven by the ability of the organization to raise funds. The purpose of this course will be to help you better understand the potential sources for funds - both from contributions and from earned income. We will examine the different options and approaches for generating contributed income and will explore how plans and strategies for these income streams can best be designed and implemented. The course will provide practical and pertinent information about various possibilities for contributed and earned income. These include, but are not limited to: Foundation grants Corporate gifts Annual appeals Special events Other individual and captial campaigns Online.

CEHL 207 Studies in Humane Education 3 cr.

This course will examine the history and theory behind the teaching of kindness to animals, and explore some of the most important topics in contemporary studies of humane education. These include the development of empathy and the theory of transference, the relevance of gender differences in attitudes and conduct toward animals, the challenge of correlation or blending and the evaluation of humane education's impacts and outcomes. What is the relationship between humane education and character education? What is the relationship between humane education and environmental education? Online.

CEHL 208 Animal Health and Behavior in a Shelter Environment 3 cr.

This course examines basic health and behavioral management issues involving shelter animals. Topics include epidemiology, shelter design and sanitation, immunization and vaccination policy, management of data, disease treatment protocols, the basic principles of nutrition and feeding, and collaboration with public health agencies. Online.

CEHL 303 Human Resource Management and Volunteer Management 3 cr.

In this course students will consider the strategic importance of employees in helping an organization fulfill its mission and goals. They will learn about best practices in recruitment and hiring, placement and orientation, staff development, environmental health and safety, labor relations, employee recognition, and compensation and benefits. The importance of understanding HR policy, employment agreements, fair employment practices, documentation, and labor law will be stressed. The course will adopt the perspective of the HR generalist who must also learn where to go when additional expertise is needed. Online.

CEHL 304 Compassion Fatigue 3 cr.

This course, designed especially for animal care and control professionals and other animal advocates, will provide students with the expertise to assess the signs and symptoms of compassion stress, and to utilize appropriate strategies to prevent compassion fatigue and its related stresses, traumas, and illnesses. Particular emphasis is placed on the animal. Online.

CEHL 305W Strategic Planning and Organizational Effectiveness 3 cr.

Nonprofit organizations operate in a dynamic environment in which many other agencies compete for resources while serving the same constituency by providing a variety of services. Skilled leaders know how to assess an organization's current level of performance, and then move the organization toward even greater effectiveness. This course will teach leaders to think strategically in such a context as they plan for. Online. University Core Writing Intens.

CEHL 306 Animal Protect as a Social Movement 3 cr.

In the past four decades, the modern animal protection movement in the United States has worked to improve the lives of animals by providing shelter and safety, winning local, state and national policy protections, and transforming social attitudes and human behavior. Drawing on both sociological and political science literature on social movements, the course explores the ideas, activists, issues and organizations that comprise the animal protection movement and the diverse set of strategies employed by the movement, including public education, protest, lobbying, litigation, direct service, and elections. The course also examines the myriad of economic interests that oppose efforts to gain protections for companion animals, farm animals, wild animals, and animals in research. Online.

CEHL 401W Marketing and Public Relations 3 cr.

The use of strategies and tactics to generate public awareness, change public policy, or otherwise influence attitudes and conduct is fundamental to humane work. Public relations, communications concepts and marketing techniques will be examined with respect to building relationships with the media and external constituencies. Students will examine nonprofit public relations and marketing communications particular to animal shelters. Emphasis is on practical application of public relations concepts and marketing strategies. The course relies in part on case studies and tactics that aid in developing a marketing and PR plan for the nonprofit organization. Online. University Core Writing Intens.

CEHL 403 Nonprofit Board of Directors 3 cr.

As the governing body of any nonprofit organization the Board of Directors is responsible for the running of the institution and every aspect of its well being. This course will examine the duties and responsibilities of the Board and how the senior staff can help them to understand and discharge those duties. We will review sample nonprofit organizations and their board structure and will investigate and promote best practices of organizations which have been cited as leaders in the area of board effectiveness. In building and developing the board, we will explore techniques that can help ensure the right members can be identified and cultivated to serve. Students will be provided with tools and skills to help in their understanding of how senior staff can effectively assist in building a strong, active and committed board of directors. We will also consider how best to ensure that the board of directors is prepared to perpetuate itself. This area of board development is vital to an organization's ability to grow and prosper. Online.

CEHL 404 Selected Topics 3 cr.

This course for professionals currently employed in animal care and control and the sheltering field will introduce the students to current, practical informaton and theoretical issues related to animal care. Topics include, but are not limited to: Animal Advocacy and Corporate Change, Animals and Public Policy, Spay and Neuter Issues in Communities and Wildlife in Shelters. Online.

CENP 100 Introduction to Nonprofit Leadership 3 cr.

This course will provide an overview of the nonprofit sector and will examine the various elements and organizations that comprise that group of institutions, along with understanding the reach and breadth of the nonprofit community. Students will learn about the history of the sector and delve into the differences and similarities between nonprofits representing areas including health and human service, arts and culture, education, religion, civic and community groups, funding organizations. Online.

CENP 205 Fundraising Basics for Nonprofits 3 cr.

The ability of a nonprofit organization to provide programs and services to meet its mission is largely driven by the ability of the organization to raise funds. The purpose of this course will be to help you better understand the potential sources for funds - both from contributions and from earned income. We will examine the different options and approaches for generating contributed income and will explore how plans and strategies for these income streams can best be designed and implemented. The course will provide practical and pertinent information about various possibilities for contributed and earned income. These include, but are not limited to: Foundation grants Corporate gifts Annual appeals Special events Other individual and capital campaigns Online.

CENP 303 Human Resource Management and Volunteer Management 3 cr.

In this course students will consider the strategic importance of employees in helping an organization fulfill its mission and goals. They will learn about best practices in recruitment and hiring, placement and orientation, staff development, environmental health and safety, labor relations, employee recognition, and compensation and benefits. The importance of understanding HR policy, employment agreements, fair employment practices, documentation, and labor law will be stressed. The course will adopt the perspective of the HR generalist who must also learn where to go when additional expertise is needed. Online.

CENP 305W Strategic Planning and Organizational Effectiveness 3 cr.

Nonprofit organizations operate in a dynamic environment in which many other agencies compete for resources while serving the same constituency by providing a variety of services. Skilled leaders know how to assess an organization's current level of performance, and then move the organization toward even greater effectiveness. This course will teach leaders to think strategically in such a context as they plan for the organization's future success. They will learn how to develop operational plans that maximize the organization's impact on its target constituency in its community. Emphasis will be placed on strategy formulation as a participatory process that engages those who will execute an organization's strategy by having them help shape it. Online. University Core Writing Intens.

CENP 401W Marketing and Public Relations 3 cr.

The use of strategies and tactics to generate public awareness, change public policy, or otherwise influence attitudes and conduct is fundamental to humane work. Public relations communications concepts and marketing techniques will be examined with respect to building relationships with the media and external constituencies. Students will examine nonprofit public relations and marketing communications particular to animal shelters. Emphasis is on practical application of public relations concepts and marketing strategies. The course relies in part on case studies and tactics that aid in developing a marketing and PR plan for the nonprofit organization. FALL. Online. University Core Writing Intens.

CENP 403 Nonprofit Board of Directors 3 cr.

As the governing body of any nonprofit organization the Board of Directors is responsible for the running of the institution and every aspect of its well being. This course will examine the duties and responsibilities of the Board and how the senior staff can help them to understand and discharge those duties. We will review sample nonprofit organizations and their board structure and will investigate and promote best practices of organizations which have been cited as leaders in the area of board effectiveness. In building and developing the board, we will explore techniques that can help ensure the right members can be identified and cultivated to serve. Students will be provided with tools and skills to help in their understanding of how senior staff can effectively assist in building a strong, active and committed board of directors. We will also consider how best to ensure that the board of directors is prepared to perpetuate itself. This area of board development is vital to an organization's ability to grow and prosper. Online.

CETD 401 Developing Training in an E-Learning Environment 3 cr.

This course will examine the theoretical foundations for effective online instruction. Students will learn online protocols and standards as well as features of major learning (content) management systems. Students will also have an opportunity to examine some of the creative software solutions that enhance online learning. Students will develop an online readiness assessment as well as a mini-online course, using a course management system such as Blackboard. Online.

CETD 402W Capstone 3 cr.

This course consists of individual study culminating in an applied research paper and training course which incorporates material from all courses covered in this concentration. Students will facilitate a training course based upon their research and may draw upon their own professional experience to demonstrate mastery of material. Online. University Core Writing Intens.

CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 4 cr.

The fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry are presented from the standpoint of atomic and molecular structure with illustrative examples from descriptive chemistry. The laboratory portion of the first semester illustrates physical and chemical properties in a quantitative manner, and the laboratory portion of the second semester illustrates the principle of ionic equilibria including quantitative inorganic analysis. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite for CHEM 121: Math 104 (College Algebra and Trigonometry) or a Math SAT greater than 500 and/or Math Placement Exam score greater than 17. Toldeo Chemistry Placement Exam is required by all students. Lecture. Core Science.

CHEM 121L General Chemistry I Lab 0 TO 1 cr.

This laboratory introduces students to techniques such as gravimetric analysis, pipeting, performing titrations, and qualitative analysis within the context of the major topics discussed in General Chemistry 121. The students also learn how to record observations in a laboratory notebook and write a scientific style lab report. Laboratory, three hours. CHEM 121 must be taken prior to or concurrent with CHEM 121L. Laboratory.

CHEM 122 General Chemistry II 4 cr.

The fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry are presented from the standpoint of atomic and molecular structure with illustrative examples from descriptive chemistry. The basic concepts of thermodynamics, chemical kinetics and equilibrium are introduced. The laboratory portion of the first semester illustrates physical and chemical properties in a quantitative manner, and the laboratory portion of the second semester illustrates the principle of ionic equilibria including quantitative inorganic analysis. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite for CHEM 122: C or better in CHEM 121. Lecture.

CHEM 122L General Chemistry II Lab 0 TO 1 cr.

This laboratory introduces students to techniques such as gravimetric analysis, pipeting, performing titrations, and qualitative analysis within the context of the major topics discussed in General Chemistry 121. The students also learn how to record observations in a laboratory notebook and write a scientific style lab report. Laboratory, three hours. Prerequisites: a C or better in CHEM 121L for CHEM 122L. CHEM 122 must be taking prior to or concurrent with CHEM 122L. Laboratory.

CHEM 131 Fundamentals of Chemistry I 5 cr.

This course covers the fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry in an integrated two semester sequence. The first part of the course deals with basic chemical concepts, including stoichiometry, the periodic table, equilibrium, structure and bonding, and acid-base chemistry. The next part of the course provides a survey of the chemical properties of the principle functional groups of organic chemistry, including alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acid and carboxylic acid derivatives. Integrated with this functional group discussion is an introduction to the carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. The latter portion of the course provides a overview of metabolism and emphasizes the roles of enzymes in catalyzing and regulating the various reactions involved in energy transformations in the cell. This course does not serve as a prerequisite for CHEM 211, 212. Lecture, four hours; laboratory, three hours; recitation, two hours. Prerequisite for CHEM 131: high school algebra or its equivalent, as evidenced by satisfactory performance on a math placement examination. Laboratory, Lecture. Core Science.

CHEM 131L Fundamentals of Chemistry I Lab 0 cr.

The laboratory introduces students to the techniques involved in doing gravimetric, volumetric, and qualitative analyses of unknown samples. They also study chemical bonding and the statistical treatment of data. In addition, they learn how to record observations in a laboratory notebook. Laboratory.

CHEM 132 Fundamentals of Chemistry II 5 cr.

This course covers the fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry in an integrated two semester sequence. The first part of the course deals with basic chemical concepts, including stoichiometry, the periodic table, equilibrium, structure and bonding, and acid-base chemistry. The next part of the course provides a survey of the chemical properties of the principle functional groups of organic chemistry, including alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acid and carboxylic acid derivatives. Integrated with this functional group discussion is an introduction to the carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. The latter portion of the course provides a overview of metabolism and emphasizes the roles of enzymes in catalyzing and regulating the various reactions involved in energy transformations in the cell. This course does not serve as a prerequisite for CHEM 211, 212. Lecture, four hours; laboratory, three hours; recitation, two hours. Prerequisite for CHEM 132: a C or better in CHEM 131. Lecture, Laboratory.

CHEM 132L Fundamentals of Chemistry II Lab 0 cr.

This lab exposes students to the basic synthetic and purification techniques used in organic chemistry. It also emphasizes the observations of the reactions of the principal organic functional groups as well as those with biological relevance such as amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Laboratory.

CHEM 141 Advanced General Chemistry I 4 cr.

The fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry are presented from a molecular standpoint. The basic concepts of bonding, molecular structure, intermolecular forces, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and equilibrium and introduced with relevant biological and environmental examples. Toledo Placement exam is required. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Lecture.

CHEM 141L Advanced General Chemistry I Lab 1 cr.

This laboratory introduces students to techniques such as gravimetric analysis, pipeting, performing titrations, and qualitative analysis within the context of the major topics discussed in Advanced General Chemistry 141. A discovery-based approach format is used in the laboratory. The students also learn how to record observations in a laboratory notebook and write a scientific style lab report. Laboratory, three hours. CHEM 141 must be taken prior to or concurrent with CHEM 141L. Laboratory.

CHEM 142 Advanced General Chemistry II 4 cr.

The fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry are presented from a molecular standpoint. The basic concepts of bonding, molecular structure, intermolecular forces, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and equilibrium are introduced with relevant biological and environmental examples. A discovery-based approach format is used in the lab. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite for 142: C or better in CHEM 141. Lecture.

CHEM 142L Advanced General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 cr.

This discovery-based laboratory introduces students to techniques such as gravimetric analysis, pipeting, performing titrations, and qualitative analysis within the context of the major topics discussed in Advanced General Chemistry 141 and 142. The students will continue to improve their observation and recording in a laboratory notebook and write a scientific style lab report. Prerequisites: C or better in CHEM 141L for CHEM 142L. CHEM 142 must be taken prior to or concurrent with CHEM 142L. Laboratory.

CHEM 211 Organic Chemistry I 3 cr.

Students are given a firm foundation in the fundamentals of structure and reactivity of organic compounds. Emphasis is on the basic mechanistic principles of the reactions and the strategies used to synthesize organic compounds. The use of NMR and IR spectroscopy to identify organic compounds is also emphasized. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisites; a C or better in CHEM 122 for CHEM 211. Lecture.

CHEM 211H Honors Organic Chemistry I 3 cr.

Students are given a firm foundation in the fundamentals of the structure and reactivity of organic compounds with the use of relevant biological examples. Emphasis is on the basic mechanistic principles of the reactions and the strategies used to synthesize organic compounds. The use of NMR, MS, IR and UV-visible methods in organic chemistry is stressed. Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite: a C or better in CHEM 122 or CHEM 122H for CHEM 211H. Lecture.

CHEM 211L Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 cr.

This lab exposes students to basic synthetic and purification techniques used in organic chemistry. Both microscale and macroscale equipment are used. The students acquire a knowledge of the various wet methods of qualitative organic analysis and also learn to generate and interpret IR and NMR spectra. Laboratory, three hours. CHEM 211 must be taken prior to or concurrent with CHEM 211L. Laboratory.

CHEM 212 Organic Chemistry II 3 cr.

Students are given a firm foundation in the fundamentals of structure and reactivity of organic compounds. Emphasis is placed on the basic mechanistic principles of the reactions and the strategies used to synthesize organic compounds. The use of NMR and IR spectroscopy to identify organic compounds is also emphasized. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite for CHEM 212: a C or better in CHEM 211 or CHEM 211H. Lecture.

CHEM 212H Honors Organic Chemistry II 3 cr.

Students are given a firm foundation in the fundamentals of the structure and reactivity of organic compounds with the use of relevant biological examples. Emphasis is on the basic mechanistic principles of the reactions and the strategies used to synthesize organic compounds. The use of NMR,MS, IR and UV-visible methods in organic chemistry is stressed. Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite for CHEM 212H: a C or better in CHEM 211H. Lecture.

CHEM 212L Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 cr.

This lab exposes students to basic synthetic and purification techniques used in organic chemistry. Both microscale and macroscale equipment are used. The students acquire a knowledge of the various wet methods of qualitative organic analysis and also learn to generate and interpret IR and NMR spectra. Laboratory, three hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 211L for CHEM 212L. CHEM 212 must be taken prior to or concurrent with CHEM 212L. Laboratory.

CHEM 230L Research Laboratory Techniques 2 cr.

This lab emphasizes the refinement of quantitative analytical wet method techniques and the application of basic statistical methods of data analysis. Corequisite: CHEM 212. Laboratory, four hours; recitation, two hours. Pre-requisite: CHEM 122 Laboratory.

CHEM 275 Environmental Chemistry 3 cr.

The course provides students with an appreciation and understanding of the fundamental and theoretical background concepts in environmental chemistry including aquatic, atmospheric, geologic, biospheric and anthropogenic. Students will learn environmental testing methods and gain the knowledge necessary for critical evaluation of procedures and data derived from environmental testing. Prerequisite: C or better in CHEM 121, CHEM 122, and MATH 115. Lecture.

CHEM 301 Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences 4 cr.

This one semester course will present the principles of physical chemistry and its application in the life and forensic sciences. Areas that will be covered include enthalpy, entropy, free energy, chemical and biochemical equilibria, redox chemistry, kinetics and spectroscopy. Illustration of how these principles are applied to fundamental problems in the life sciences, forensic sciences and bio- chemistry will be made. Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite: a C or better in CHEM 212 or CHEM 212H. Lecture.

CHEM 312 Inorganic Chemistry I 3 cr.

A survey of the basic principles required for understanding inorganic chemistry including molecular structure, periodic trends, bonding models, crystal structure, and the 18-electron rule, as well as principles will be applied and principally to the main group elements and their compounds. An introduction to molecular symmetry and transition metal chemistry will also be provided. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: a C or better in CHEM 321 (or CHEM 301). Lecture.

CHEM 321 Physical Chemistry I 3 cr.

This class provides an understanding of atomic and molecular structure and energy. Competency in integration, differentiation, complex analysis, and liner algebra is expected and reviewed. The material covered involves the Schrodinger equation, particle in a box, postulates of quantum mechanics, the harmonic oscillator and rigid roto, and the hydrogen atom. The class objective is to establish a solid foundation in quantum chemistry to be applied and understood in more advanced topics of chemical bonding and molecular spectroscopy. Lecture, four hours. Prerequisites: PHYS 202 or 212, C or better in CHEM 212, and C or better in MATH 116. Lecture.

CHEM 322 Physical Chemistry II 3 cr.

This class builds upon the quantum foundation of simple models to understand more complex phenomena involving chemical bonding. First, the variational and perturbation techniques are examined to explore the ideas behind chemical bonding. Computational quantum chemistry and group theory are employed to give a quantitative experience beyond the theory. The second half of the class integrates quantum principles with thermodynamics through the partition function. The class objective is to establish a solid foundation in quantum chemistry to be applied and understood in chemical bonding, molecular spectroscopy, and thermodynamics. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: C or better in CHEM 321. Lecture.

CHEM 325L Advanced Integrated Lab I 1 TO 3 cr.

Students consolidate basic laboratory technique and learn to use and interpret results from modern chemical analytical instrumentation. Experiments are open-ended allowing students to approach problems in a genuine scientific format of designing their approach to defined problems; executing the experiments, and interpreting the results. Topic areas are drawn from inorganic synthesis, kinetics, chemical analysis, biochemical analysis, and spectroscopy. Techniques include chromatography, spectroscopy, electrophoresis, computational methods and statistics. Students will begin learning to interpret and communicate their work. Laboratory, eight hours. Prerequisite: C or better in CHEM 301 or CHEM 321. Laboratory.

CHEM 343 Physical Chemistry III 3 cr.

The focus of this class is thermodynamics and kinetics. Course content builds upon basic ideas and concepts presented in the previous two semesters. The material integrates classical thermodynamics into the ideas and concepts covering the Laws of Thermodynamics, physical and chemical equilibria, solutions, electrochemistry and gas phase kinetics. The class objective is to establish a solid foundation in thermodynamics and kinetics to be applied and understood in the behavior of matter. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: C or better in CHEM 322. Lecture.

CHEM 371W Forensic Chemistry Lab 2 cr.

371W Students will learn the basic techniques used in a forensic laboratory. They will use microscopy, IR, visible spectroscopy, and GC-MS to analyze hair, fabrics, fingerprints, and glass fragments. They will learn to detect metal residues, flammable liquids, and poisons. Laboratory, six hours. Prerequisite: C or better in CHEM 423. Laboratory. University Core Writing Intens.

CHEM 391 Chemistry Experience in China 3 cr.

This course provides an in depth three-week scientific and cultural experience in China facilitated through Duquesne University and the Chinese Association of Science and Technology. Students will travel to several universities in China and work in seminars or small groups with the opportunity to (1)communicate orally and in] writing in topics such as environmental chemistry and pollution abatement; (2)acquire appropriate learning skills for collective laboratory work: (3)become familiar with global scientific issues through actively participating in scientific presentations. Students must participate in pre-trip seminars during the spring semester, in the August three-week trip including all activities during the trip, in the writing of reports to include in the trip summary document, and in a post-trip presentation to the public. Pass/Fail. Field Work.

CHEM 401 General Biochemistry I 3 cr.

An introduction to modern biochemistry at the molecular level. The course includes discussion of the structure and function of proteins, the chemical mechanisms and regulation of enzyme catalysis, biomembrane structure and function, the structure and metabolism of carbohydrates, and the bioenergetics metabolism of ATP synthesis and utilization. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: C or better in CHEM 212 or CHEM 212H. Lecture.

CHEM 402 General Biochemistry II 3 cr.

This course is a continuation of CHEM 401. The course presents an overview of the metabolic transformations of fatty acids and the complex lipids, amino acids and the purine and pyrimidine nucleotides. The second half of the course offers a discussion of the molecular basis of genetics, including DNA and RNA metabolism, protein biosynthesis, and an introduction to the biochemical basis of recombinant DNA methodology. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: C or better in CHEM 401. Lecture.

CHEM 408 Biomolecular Structure and Function 3 cr.

A detailed study of protein structure, function and the methodology, both biophysical and molecular, used to study proteins and their interactions. Areas that will be covered will include domain structure, protein trafficking, small and large molecule interactions with proteins and protein modification. Throughout this course the students will be introduced to the practical biophysical and molecular biology methods utilized in the study of proteins, protein-protein interactions and protein-nucleic acid interactions. Prerequisite: C or better in CHEM 402. Lecture.

CHEM 412 Inorganic Chemistry II 3 cr.

The course heavily draws upon the basic principles of inorganic chemistry and applies them to transition metal chemistry. Topics include organometallic compounds, coordinateion compounds, point group symmetry, ligand field theory, and its applications, as well as electronic spectra, inorganic reaction mechanisms, and extended solids. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: a C or better in CHEM 312 and CHEM 322. Lecture.

CHEM 423 Analytical Chemistry 3 cr.

Theoretical and practical training of modern methods in chemical analysis with emphasis on instrumental methods. Corequisite: CHEM 301 or CHEM 321. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: C or better in CHEM 230L. Lecture.

CHEM 425L Advanced Integrated Lab II 1 TO 3 cr.

Students work in small teams on real research problems. Each team contributes to a single problem, and several chemical and biochemical problems may be studied over the course of a semester. Examples include determining the expression of quality markers and antioxidants in wine production, problems of self assembled biomolecules, protein structure-function relationships, lipid reactivity and physiochemical behavior, etc. Problems are designed according to student career interests. They will also learn advanced data analysis and communication skills. Laboratory, 8 hours. Prerequisite: a C or better in CHEM 325L, CHEM 325R. Laboratory.

CHEM 475 Senior Seminar 1 cr.

A capstone course exhibiting the interdisciplinary nature of chemistry. Each faculty member will provide a perspective on how their discipline contributes to the frontiers of science. Seminar.

CHEM 490H Honors Undergraduate Research 1 TO 2 cr.

Exceptional undergraduates that have been accepted into the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Honors program will perform advanced level research with the goal of producing sufficient quality data to enable them to prepare an Honors Thesis and manuscripts for publication. Laboratory.

CHEM 490W Undergraduate Research 1 TO 2 cr.

Selected students work on a research problem under the direction of a staff member. Laboratory. University Core Writing Intens.

CHEM 499 Undergraduate Thesis 1 cr.

This course is designed to help students who are conducting undergraduate research in Chemistry and Biochemistry to prepare their thesis and to present their thesis defense. Thesis.

CHEM 499H Honors Undergraduate Thesis 1 cr.

This course is designed to help students in the Honor Undergraduate Program in Chemistry and Biochemistry to prepare their thesis and to present their thesis defense. Thesis.

CHEM 514W Advanced Forensic Chemistry Laboratory 2 cr.

Students will continue to learn the instrumentation and more advanced techniques used in a forensic laboratory. They will detect metal residues, flammable liquids explosives, poisons and drugs using methods which include, GC-MS, LC-MS/MS, IR, PXRD, and SEM. Prerequisite: Forensic Chemistry Lab. Laboratory, six hours. Laboratory. University Core Writing Intens.

CHEM 691 Seminar 0 cr.

The course provides a forum for students to learn the latest developments at the forefront of chemistry. Seminar.

CJFS 416 Independent Study 3 cr.

CLDR 370W Principles of Organizational Leadership 3 cr.

Introduction to the historical concepts, principles and theories of leadership, emphasizing self-assessment, contemporary views and issues, basic skills and competencies. Particular attention will be given to differentiating the interdisciplinary nature of leadership from the traditional discipline of management and provide application opportunities within the classroom and/or workplace setting. Online, Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLDR 405W Leadership and Social Change 3 cr.

This course explores values and skills that allow leaders to make a positive impact on the societies in which they live. Students typically enroll in this class toward the end of their undergraduate coursework, so that the class may serve as a "capstone experience" of sorts. With a central theme of leadership, Duquesne University students in the School of Leadership and Professional Advancement ask themselves in this course how the skills they have developed are preparing them to address the social injustices they see in their world. The course is writing-intensive and integrates service-learning into ideas surrounding leadership and social change. Lecture, Online. University Core Writing Intens.

CLDR 410W The Entrepreneurial Leader 3 cr.

Entrepreneurial Leadership will survey the history, theory, and practice of entrepreneurship. Specifically, we will explore the person engaged in and the process of entrepreneurship in an effort to understand the entrepreneur as a unique type of leader. Topics covered include what it means to be an entrepreneur, sources of innovation, product development, the start-up process and leading entrepreneur teams. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLDR 412W Critical Thinking and Decision Making 3 cr.

One of the most important skills for leadership today is the ability to think both broadly and critically as new issues arise for our organizations. This online course is designed to provide students with a broad-based understanding of problem analysis and decision making from a leadership perspective. Students will be expected to analyze, critique and apply critical thinking skills to problem-solving and decision-making. Case studies will be presented online with individual participation in assessing and discussing the practical application of decision- making theory. Students will have the opportunity to assess personal decision-making styles and characteristics. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLDR 414W Mediating Organizational Disputes 3 cr.

This course will introduce students to the emerging discipline of conflict analysis and resolution from an organizational perspective. The course will also include an opportunity for students to practice techniques of conflict resolution. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLDR 416W Creating High Performance Success 3 cr.

Research supports that the most successful people and organizations approach their endeavors and deal with variables differently than those who are not as successful. A few prominent social scientists and consultants have found that secrets practiced by these highly successful Star Performers focus more on how they approach life and work, rather than cognitive ability alone. This course explores such research completed by Robert E. Kelley and others. Students will have an opportunity to benchmark their work strategies with star performers. As a result, students will create their own high performance success path that can have a significant application to their lives. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLDR 474W Building Effective Teams 3 cr.

This course will examine the a) genesis of the work team approach in organizations, b) potential benefits and pitfalls of the work team approach, c) role of effective leadership in work-teams, d) most effective approaches to building a team based organization, and e) the necessity of evaluating work-teams on outcome measures. This course will also provide the student with significant team experiences in the classroom. Lecture, Online. University Core Writing Intens.

CLDR 477W Valuing a Multicultural Workforce 3 cr.

Topics covered include: History, participation, trends and projections; Socialization, roles and norms; Segregation within the workplace; Stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination; Sexuality in the workplace; Individual differences and cultural values; Mobility and career development; and Managing diversity. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLDR 478W Careers in Organizations 3 cr.

This course will focus on a leadership approach to career development in today's organizations. Principles of mentoring and coaching will be explored and examples of good and poor programs will be discussed. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLDR 479W Human Resources: People Practicing Leadership 3 cr.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic components of human resources. Students will become familiar with the functioning of employee relations, training and development, compensation, benefits, AA/EEO and recruitment. Students will be exposed to a variety of human resource models and complete a project focused on one discipline. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLDR 480W Leadership and Ethics 3 cr.

This course is designed to assist the student in seeing the confluence of leadership theory and ethical systems of thought through the application of theory in practical usage. The student will examine four cases for the purpose of putting theory into practice. Through this exercise the student will gain insights into self through the completion of exercises for the Leadership Journal. Lecture. Core Ethics, University Core Writing Intens.

CLDR 484W Leadership:Starting from the Self 3 cr.

Recent research suggests there is another, even more essential ingredient for effective leadership than IQ-emotional intelligence. The components of emotional intelligence include self awareness, emotional control, persistence, resilience, self- motivation, empathy and social skills. These factors are vital to taking control of one's life, thinking clearly, making decisions and building trust and credibility with others. In this course, students will explore emotional intelligence as it relates to successful leadership skills and will create personal development plans to apply what they have learned. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLDR 486W Leadership Gender Perspectives 3 cr.

This course will examine some of the recent work on male and female leaders and will explore if, in fact, we are asking the correct question(s). That is, perhaps we should refocus away from the differences between male and female leaders and move toward a search for the best qualities of both. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLDR 487W Leading Change in Organizations 3 cr.

This course is designed to introduce students to the structure of change, its implications for organizations, and some models and assumptions about leading change. There will be an opportunity to analyze specific kinds of change and begin to understand the leader's role. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLDR 499W Organizational Leadership:Capstone Seminar 3 cr.

The Capstone Seminar is the integrating experience for the Organizational Leadership concentration. Students will pull together their leadership philosophy and significant experiences from this past year, read and discuss case studies in leadership, prepare a summary of their significant leadership learning, and learn to make an effective group presentation regarding their accomplishments in the leadership curriculum. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLPR 007 College Experience 1 cr.

CLPR 008 Strategies for Academic Success 1 cr.

This course is designed to help students understand the academic rigors of college so they can develop personal approaches to achieve classroom success. Course content includes learning styles, time management, goal setting, critical and creative thinking, reading comprehension, effective note taking, and test taking strategies. Lecture.

CLPR 009 Academic Strategies for International Students 0 TO 1 cr.

This course is designed to help international students understand how a U.S. university works. Course content includes goal setting, instructors' expectations, time management, library research, academic planning, creative thinking, note taking, and test taking strategies. Lecture.

CLPR 011 Seminar for New International Students 0 TO 1 cr.

This course is designed to help new undergraduate and graduate international students adjust to the social and academic aspects of Duquesne University. Seminar.

CLPR 015 Introduction to University Success 1 cr.

This course is designed to help students adjust to their new surroundings as University students. Discussions will concentrate on becoming familiar with Duquesne University---students, faculty, staff, services, and facilities---to maximize your college experience. Lecture.

CLPR 016 Pathways to Success 1 cr.

This course is designed to help students in academic difficulty improve their academic status. It is a requirement for second semester freshmen whose low first semester performance puts them in academic jeopardy, i.e., academic dismissal. The course addresses the major conderns of struggling students: time management, choosing a major, not succeeding in the first choice of major, missing family and friends, study skills, and adjustments to the requirements of college. In addition to required enrollment in the course, students are restricted to no more than 13 credits, including this one-credit course, during their second semester. Lecture.

CLPR 250 Community Engagement Scholars Seminar I 1 cr.

The Community Engagement Scholars (CES) program provides opportunities to learn as well as lead others in service. CES Seminar I is designed to help them develop as leaders and servants. Specifically, this seminar helps students to use their community experiences to illustrate the notion and elements of community-university partnerships; distinguish what is meant by the term "service" and the various ways people can serve others; develop and employ a set of skills to engage others in service to the larger community; examine a strategy for consensus-building and problem solving within a group setting; and consider their potential as social change leaders. Seminar.

CLPR 251 Community Engagement Scholars Seminar II 1 cr.

The Community Engagement Scholars (CES) program provides opportunities to learn as well as lead others in service. CES Seminar II is designed to help them develop as leaders and servants. Specifically, this seminar helps students to name conditions of injustice in society and identify the root causes of such injustice; name and describe a variety of means to address social injustice; discuss their personal leadership styles and identify their personal strengths; consider their potential as social change leaders; and assess what further learning and resources are needed to leverage their potential for being a social change leader. Seminar.

CLSX 105C Digging for Identity 3 cr.

An introduction to the discipline and practice of archaeology, with a focus on the use and abuse of archaeological evidence to define peoples of the past and present. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

CLSX 111 Art History: Ancient-Medieval 3 cr.

A chronologically oriented, detailed presentation of the history of Western art. This survey deals with Near Easton, Greek, Roman, Early Christian and Medieval art. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

CLSX 112 Art History: Renaissance to Modern World 3 cr.

A continuation of 111. Surveys Renaissance, Baroque and Modern art in Western Europe. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

CLSX 122 Etymology of Scientific Terms 3 cr.

Introduction to Greek and Latin elements of scientific terminology. Lecture.

CLSX 210 Caput Mundi: Rome as Center of a Diverse World 3 cr.

An overview of the cultural history of Rome from c. 400 BC to AD 590. This course uses the city of Rome with its abundance of archaeological sites and museums to provide a comprehensive overview of the Roman world, its history, culture and society. By integrating the monuments and art of each period, it becomes possible to recreate a fuller vision of the ancient city of Rome as the physical embodiment of Rome's concepts of cultural and social identity, as well as the impact of classical conceptions on modern conceptions and ideas. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

CLSX 213 Western Civilization I 3 cr.

An introductory survey of the origins and characteristics of European Civilization, emphasizing the personalities and events and institutions that have shaped the West. Lecture.

CLSX 223 Classical Mythology 3 cr.

The major myths of Greece and Rome with special attention to contemporary interpretations of myth and the influence of myth on art and literature. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

CLSX 223C Classical Mythology 3 cr.

The major myths of Greece and Rome with special attention to contemporary interpretations of myth and the influence of myth on art and literature. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

CLSX 230 Ancient Theater 3 cr.

An examination of the origins and development of ancient tragedy and comedy. Lecture.

CLSX 230W Ancient Theater 3 cr.

An examination of the origins and development of ancient tragedy and comedy. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLSX 231 Ancient Epic 3 cr.

A study of ancient epic literature with particular attention to the techniques of oral and literary composition. Lecture.

CLSX 231W Ancient Epic 3 cr.

A study of ancient epic literature with particular attention to the techniques of oral and literary composition. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLSX 233 Ancient Satire 3 cr.

Investigation of the satirical element in classical literature with special reference to the writings of Lucilius, Horace, Persius, Martial, and Juvenal. Lecture.

CLSX 233W Ancient Satire 3 cr.

Investigation of the satirical element with reference to the writings of Lucilius, Horace, Persius, Martial, and Juvenal. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLSX 234 Women Sickness and Sanctity in the Middle Ages 3 cr.

This course examines the complicated relationship between sanctity, sin, and illness in attitudes toward women in the later middle ages. Students will consider how medieval writers conceptualized the mystical experiences, martyrdoms, and illnesses of women. In particular, students will grapple with the ways sex and gender shape texts by comparing how men and women wrote about the female soul and body. A range of literary genres will be consulted: hagiography, autobiography, and medical treatises. Lecture.

CLSX 234W Women Sickness and Sanctity in the Middle Ages 3 cr.

This course examines the complicated relationship between sanctity, sin, and illness in attitudes toward women in the later middle ages. Students will consider how medieval writers conceptualized the mystical experiences, martyrdoms, and illnesses of women. In particular, students will grapple with the ways sex and gender shape texts by comparing how men and women wrote about the female soul and body. A range of literary genres will be consulted: hagiography, autobiography, and medical treatises. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLSX 235 Love and Violence in Roman Poetry 3 cr.

This course will introduce students to representations of love and violence in the elegiac, didactic, epistolary, and epic poetry of the Augustan poet Ovid. The complicated representations of women as both objects and agents of erotic desire and aggression have lead readers to label Ovid a misogynist as well as a proto-feminist. Through close readings and discussions of his texts, students will be encouraged to explore issues of sex and gender in the Augustan Age, according to Ovid, and as translated into his poetry. Students will also work to analyze Ovid's poetry on its own terms, giving attention to the relationship between genre and content. Lecture.

CLSX 236 Greek, Roman and Medieval Mothers 3 cr.

An exploration of the representation of mothers, motherhood, and the maternal body in medical, mythological, and religious literature from ancient Greece to the High Middle Ages. Lecture.

CLSX 242 Ancient Law 3 cr.

A survey including the contributions of the Greeks and of the Romans to the development of law. Lecture.

CLSX 242W Ancient Law 3 cr.

A survey including the contributions of the Greeks and of the Romans to the development of law. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLSX 243W Jews Under Empire 3 cr.

An exploration of Jewish history in the imperial contexts of the Persian, Hellenistic, and Roman periods. In particular, we will consider the strategies Jews employed to explain and live under empire through critical study of the creative and diverse corpus of ancient Jewish literature. A key focus will be religion, but we will also discuss politics, society, economy, and the military. Topics will include: the Jews of Ptolemaic Egypt, the Maccabean Revolt, the Hasmonean dynasty, Herod the Great, the Alexandrian riots of 38 CE, Jewish sectarianism, the First Jewish Revolt, and the emergence of Christianity. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity, University Core Writing Intens.

CLSX 244 History-Ancient Medicine 3 cr.

Examination of the most significant medical theories and practices in the period from the Egyptian temple physicians to the doctors of the Roman Empire. Special attention will be given to Hippocrates and Galen. Lecture.

CLSX 245 Greek History 3 cr.

An examination of the development of Greek history and culture from earliest times up to the death of Alexander of Macedon. Lecture.

CLSX 249 History-Egyptian Civilization 3 cr.

A survey of Egyptian history and culture from pre-dynastic period to the establishment of Roman rule in Egypt. Special attention will be given to the artistic, literary, and religious achievements of Egypt. Lecture.

CLSX 249W History-Egyptian Civilization 3 cr.

A survey of Egyptian history and culture from pre-dynastic period to the establishment of Roman rule in Egypt. Special attention will be given to the artistic, literary, and religious achievements of Egypt. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLSX 250 The Rise of Constantine and Christianity 3 cr.

This course will trace the development of Christianity from its unique origins in the Roman province of Judea and note the reasons for its growth throughout the entire empire. Students will examine why Christianity appealed to various ancient peoples, why traditional Roman religion had ceased to appeal and how Constantine advanced his political regime along with his personal belief in Christianity. With this information, students will be able to understand the Catholic Church and the reason for its location in Rome as well as to review the Christianity of the Greek Orthodox Church. Lecture. Theme Area Faith and Reason.

CLSX 252 Roman History 3 cr.

An investigation of the Roman state from foundation to fall. Topics will include politics, the military, culture, religion, society, and economy. Readings will include a wide range of carefully selected ancient texts. Lecture.

CLSX 260 Classical Tradition in Literature 3 cr.

A study of the influences of Graeco-Roman civilization on later ages. Lecture.

CLSX 260W Classical Tradition in Literature 3 cr.

A study of the influences of Graeco-Roman civilization on later ages. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLSX 300 Seminar 3 cr.

Topics variable. Lecture.

CLSX 303W Seminar: Women in Antiquity 3 cr.

Explores the reality of women's lives in antiquity as seen in literature and visual images from the ancient world. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLSX 313 Archaeology and the Bible 3 cr.

An illumination through archaeology of the historical setting, the cultural background, and the events described in the Bible; a general introduction to the techniques of archaeological investigation and a study of the principal archaeological sites in Palestine. Lecture.

CLSX 314 Introduction to Archaeology 3 cr.

An overview of the discipline of archaeology. We will consider the discipline's aims, history, theories, and methods, and will devote special attention to its modern practice, problems, ethical concerns, and significance. Also important will be the study of a wide range of archaeological sites throughout the world. Lecture.

CLSX 315 Archaeological History: Ancient Greek World 3 cr.

A survey of the archaeology of Greece from prehistory to the Roman period. Lecture.

CLSX 315W Archaeological History: Ancient Greek World 3 cr.

A survey of the archaeology of Greece from prehistory to the Roman period. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLSX 316 Archaeological History of Athens 3 cr.

An investigation into the topography and monuments of Athens and Attica, from the prehistoric to the Roman period. Lecture.

CLSX 316W Archaeological History of Athens 3 cr.

An investigation into the topography and monuments of Athens and Attica, from the prehistoric to the Roman period. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLSX 317 Archaeological History Ancient Roman World 3 cr.

A survey of the archaeology of Italy from prehistory to the middle fourth century A.D. Lecture.

CLSX 317W Archaeological History: Ancient Roman World 3 cr.

A survey of the archaeology of Italy from prehistory to the middle fourth Century A.D. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLSX 318 Archaeological History of Rome 3 cr.

An investigation of the topography and monuments of Rome from prehistory through Constantine. Lecture.

CLSX 318W Archaeological History of Rome 3 cr.

An investigation of the topography and monuments of Rome from prehistory through Constantine. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLSX 319 Archaeological History: Seminar 3 cr.

Possible topics include The Bronze Age Aegean, The development of Vase Painting, The Etruscans, etc. Lecture.

CLSX 319W Archaeological History: Seminar 3 cr.

Possible topics include The Bronze Age Aegean, The development of Vase Painting, The Etruscans, etc. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

CLSX 321 Art, Architecture and Archaeology Augustan Age 3 cr.

An examination of the Augustan period in the light of its material culture focusing on the art and architecture produced under Augustus in Rome and Augustus' influence upon the later Roman Empire and the Fascist archaeology under Mussolini. Lecture.

CLSX 322 Rome's Golden Age-Augustan Literature 3 cr.

We shall read-in English-a sampling of the works of Vergil, Horace, Propertius, and Ovid as well as Livy's histories, focusing on Vergil's Aeneid, -all literatures which would glorify Rome and its beginnings as well as the first emperor's own lineage. Lecture.

CLSX 361 Michelangelo-Caravaggio-Bernini 3 cr.

This course will study the art and personalities of three great superstars of Italy's golden age of art-The Renaissance and Baroque periods. Internationally famous and influential, patronized by popes and princes, at times irascible, opinionated, or even violent, these artists defined the artistic styles of these periods, and transformed how the world saw art and artists. Lecture.

CLSX 400 Independent Reading and Research 1 TO 3 cr.

Provides an opportunity to do independent reading and research under the supervision of a faculty member with approval of the Chairman. Independent Study.

COBS 320 Management and Leadership 3 cr.

Are leadership and management the same thing? How are they similar? How are they different? Why is it important to be both an effective leader as well as an effective manager? The course will introduce students to principles of management and leadership in today's complex organizations. We will review the basics of both leadership and management with an emphasis on those topics that are important today: ethics, social and emotional intelligence, sustainability and working in a virtual world. This course will draw attention to how these concepts apply to each student currently as well as how it may later in life. Online, Lecture.

COBS 330 Industrial and Organizational Psychology 3 cr.

This course focuses on the study of people and social processes in organizations. Students will have the opportunity to consider, for example, questions such as: What motivates people at work (or not!). Why do some work teams perform beautifully and others flop? How can I as an employee better understand the complex dynamics of the social system that is my organization and learn to navigate it while keeping (sort of) my sanity? Through readings and discussion we will begin to develop a new "lens" through which to view the behavior and attitudes of individuals and groups within an organizational culture. Lecture.

COBS 331 Human Performance Improvement 3 cr.

Human performance technologies are methods for identifying and addressing situations in which individuals, groups and organizations do not function at their full potential. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to analyze organizational needs, identify associated performance requirements, identify performance problems and their causes, recommend appropriate interventions, and develop an evaluation strategy. Lecture.

COBS 350 Organizational Behavior-World Class Organizations 3 cr.

Do you want to help your organization become a World Class Organization, capable of competing successfully in the global marketplace? Then you must understand the processes and underlying structures that contribute to sustaining organizational performance. This online course will introduce you to the key "pillars" in building a World Class Organization. Lecture.

COBS 352 Principles of Organizational Behavior 3 cr.

This course introduces students to the theories, concepts, and terminology of the discipline of organizational behavior. The course takes a three tiered perspective to studying the human side of management by looking at individual, group, and organizational level behavior. Lecture.

COBS 361 Organizational Research 3 cr.

This course provides students with an understanding of the critical role of research, systematic assessment, and evaluation to identify and solve organization problems and to improve organization performance. The primary focus is on the practical application of research methods to improving organizational programs, services, policies, and performance. Lecture.

COBS 362 Organizational Design and Development 3 cr.

Leaders search for methods to fashion more effective and efficient ways to operate companies, tap human potential, and create hospitable work environments. The fundamental fact that businesses are made up of people and not machines, computers or any other mechanical equipment is often over looked. This course will consider organizational design and development in the paradigm shifting light of the ingenious workplace. Organizations will be studied as identity-based coalitions, bound together in common narrative, engaged in entrepreneurial innovation. Lecture.

COBS 370 Power and Politics in Organizations 3 cr.

We will explore the processes of power, politics, and persuasion. Specifically, we will address types and sources of power; learn the application of politics to getting things done within organizations. Finally, we will also improve our powers of persuasion by understanding the process and practicing the skill. Lecture.

COBS 400 Best Practices in Organizations 3 cr.

This course will integrate classic management theories with current day practices. The student will integrate multiple perspectives on leading organizations through classic articles, biographies, and current periodicals and or case studies. This course will explore selected topics and themes that vary by instructor and semester. Lecture.

COBS 440 Organizational Socialization 3 cr.

We will explore the inter-dependant dynamics of the interplay between the individual, the organization, and the environment through the lens of social-psychology. Specific topics include values, norms, culture, and social processes. . This course will focus on the process by which organizations and individuals can and do change each other. Lecture.

COBS 442 Organizational Leadership and Knowledge Management 3 cr.

The purpose of this course is to examine individual, group and organizational learning processes in the workplace. We will discuss adult learning theories and best instructional practices as well as strategies for becoming a learning organization. Lecture.

COMM 101 Debate 0 TO 6 cr.

The course develops competency in critical thinking, writing, speaking, and synthesizing information quickly and clearly for the purpose of communicating well with others. The end goal is to demonstrate intellectual agility and a commitment to ethical and moral discussion in a complex world. The focus is on formal argument with undergraduate students from other universities. Practicum.

COMM 102 Public Speaking 3 cr.

Develops communicative skills necessary to analyze verbal discourse and to perform effectively in public speaking situations that confront the educated person. Emphasizes the importance of standpoint and worldview in understanding, developing, and articulating positions. Lecture. Theme Area Faith and Reason.

COMM 102C Public Speaking 3 cr.

Develops communicative skills necessary to analyze verbal discourse and to perform effectively in public speaking situations that confront the educated person. Emphasizes the importance of standpoint and worldview in understanding, developing, and articulating positions. Lecture. Theme Area Faith and Reason.

COMM 103 Exploring Interpersonal Communication 3 cr.

Introduces interpersonal communication praxis (theory-informed action) in personal and professional relationships. The course develops communication skills in a variety of personal and professional relationships, including friendships, romantic relationships, work relationships, and family relationships and explores how interpersonal justice, a requirement for social justice, both stemming from and contributing to its action, requires reflection and care. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

COMM 103C Exploring Interpersonal Communication 3 cr.

Introduces interpersonal communication praxis (theory-informed action) in personal and professional relationships. The course develops communication skills in a variety of personal and professional relationships, including friendships, romantic relationships, work relationships, and family relationships and explores how interpersonal justice, a requirement for social justice, both stemming from and contributing to its action, requires reflection and care. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

COMM 114 Exploring Intercultural Communication 3 cr.

Provides a foundation for improved intercultural communication. Exploring Interculturral Communication studies the influence of cultural diversity on interpersonal (one on one) interactions, but resists the temptation to trivialize intercultural communication by reducing it to a set of "do's and don'ts" of another culture. Instead, this course fosters understanding and respect for disparate worldviews. Second, the course transcends a limited "skills" approach and looks instead toward theory that grounds understanding of differences in belief, cultural practices, values, and ethics and their influence on intercultural engagement in interpersonal settings. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

COMM 201 Human Communication in a Technological Age 3 cr.

Engages ethical and practical implications of an increasingly mediated society in which people create, use, and are influenced by technological change in every sphere of human communication. Students explore theoretical questions concerning new communication technologies and applications -- learning to ask not "can it be done?", but "should it be done?" Students learn to build communicative practices in which technology assists rather than controls human communication. Lecture.

COMM 202 Business & Professional Communication 3 cr.

Focuses on multiple modes of communication in business, government, industrial, and not-for-profit or service organizations ranging from routine messages, memos, and e-mail to letters and professional presentations. Course highlights persuasion as a key component of all business & professional messages. Lecture.

COMM 203W Communication & Professional Civility 3 cr.

Develops communication skills in group and organizational relationships. Course emphasizes the role of professional civility as a communicative ethic in interaction with all organizational stakeholders, with a special emphasis on the health care context engaged by physician assistants. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

COMM 204 Professional Communication in Integrated Marketing 3 cr.

Integrates basic oral and written communication skills, and presentational technology skills within a professional communication context. Professional assignments with case studies guide instruction. Lecture.

COMM 205 Argument in the Global Public Sphere 3 cr.

Explores structure and content of arguments focused on issues of global concern emerging in the international public sphere. Students conduct research and prepare and present arguments from multiple aspects of these issues. May involve public performance. Lecture.

COMM 206 Communication in the Marketplace 3 cr.

Provides an introduction to communication in marketplace contexts, with particular attention to professional discourse with internal and external audiences. Topics may include an introduction to advertising and public relations/integrated marketing communication, professional communication in the workplace, and sales and service communication. Lecture.

COMM 208 Advanced Public Speaking 3 cr.

Engages advanced theory and practice of public speaking, with an emphasis on persuasive speech. Lecture.

COMM 220 Approaches to Rhetoric, Religion, and Society 3 cr.

Explores intersections between religion and public life in civic contexts through rhetorical principles and practices. The course focuses on the context of American society, history, and practice. Lecture. Theme Area Faith and Reason.

COMM 246 Forensics: Public Performance 3 cr.

Students learn formal elements of forensic performance as an artistic event, understanding how these elements work together to create a coherent whole, applying elements, skills, techniques, and processes appropriate for the performing art of forensic performance. Students study theory and practice of categories of oral interpretation, public address/oratory, storytelling, and other communicative performances, prepare performances for presentation, and execute performances. Lecture.

COMM 301W History of Communication 3 cr.

Surveys rhetoric and public communication from the ancient tradition of rhetoric to the rise of mediated and mass delivery systems. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

COMM 304 Persuasion 3 cr.

Examines theory and practice of the influence of beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors. Lecture.

COMM 304W Persuasion 3 cr.

Examines theory and practice of the influence of beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

COMM 305 Undergraduate Research and Development I 3 cr.

Provides opportunity for undergraduate students to conduct research on topics in the field of applied communication, evaluate evidence, construct white papers, and deliver information to clients. The course centers upon delivery of integrated marketing communication (public relations, advertising, and marketing) and corporate communication research in cooperation with clients in the for-profit and not-for-profit marketplace. Lecture.

COMM 306 Undergraduate Research and Development II 3 cr.

Offers additional experience in communication research and development. Provides opportunity for undergraduate students to conduct research on topics in the field of applied communication, evaluate evidence, construct white papers, and deliver information to clients. The course centers upon delivery of integrated marketing communictaion (public relations, advertising, and marketing) and corporate communication research in cooperation with clients in the for-profit and not-for-profit marketplace. Lecture.

COMM 309 Visual Communication 3 cr.

Visual Communication explores principles of rhetorical design and analysis of visual messages for professional communication contexts, including integrated marketing and corporate communication. Lecture.

COMM 311 Rhetoric of Digital Communication 3 cr.

Examines the communication implications of the digital revolution. Students study the narrative of the digital revolution, beginning in the 1960's, as an entry point for considering digitally-mediated human communication today. Lecture.

COMM 312 Corporate & Integrated Marketing Communication Systems 3 cr.

Examines the philosophical and pragmatic implications of communication technologies, including the effects of social networking and other technologies on marketing and corporate communication processes. Students explore the digital and technological revolution through examination of prior technological revolutions in communication, e.g. writing, the printing press, and the telegraph. Lecture.

COMM 320 Family Communication 3 cr.

Examines the role of communication in the construction and maintenance of family (i.e., primary human relationships and groups). Students will encounter ways of viewing family interactions from both the traditional and new approaches to the family unit, describe the major theoretical perspectives underlying family communication, and explore cultural differences in family formation, communication, and expectations. The course will identify how families communicate rules, roles, and stories that are essential to the process of meaning-making in the family and its development. Lecture.

COMM 322 Corporate Communication: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Communication 3 cr.

Explores the role of strategic corporate communication in positioning an organization's mission and identity for internal and external publics/stakeholders with regard to environmental concerns. Lecture.

COMM 330 Integrated Marketing Communication Functions I: PR 3 cr.

Introduces students to public relations functions in Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC). Public relations functions are engaged through case studies and an historical orientation to IMC. Students develop literacy and fluency in public relations practices necessary for internships and entry-level positions in integrated marketing communication. Lecture.

COMM 333 Integrated Marketing Communication Functions II: AD 3 cr.

Introduces students to Advertising functions in Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC). Advertising functions are engaged through case studies and an historical orientation to IMC. Students develop literacy and fluency in advertising practices necessary for internship and entry-level positions in integrated marketing communication. Lecture.

COMM 334 Corporate/Integrated Marketing Communication: International Experience 3 cr.

This course focuses on the Scottish Enlightenment and its international influence on the theory and practice of corporate and integrated marketing communication. Two countries, Scotland and England, provide the physical and philosophical points of departure for a praxis study of the origins and development of both fields. You will read Enlightenment philosophers while studying marketplace developments related to corporate and integrated marketing communication. Each day will consist of philosophical discussions and experiential learning. Lectures from resident scholars in each country, faculty-led discussions, company visits, and cultural experiences will inform this two-fold approach, enabling dynamic, textured learning about the relationship between the Scottish Enlightenment and corporate and integrated marketing communication. Lecture.

COMM 340 Technical Communication 3 cr.

Technical communication presents expert information to non-expert audiences. Explaining information well is essential in explaining products and services, promoting understanding, cultivating trust, and promoting participation in public or organizational initiatives. This course exposes students to technical communication and offers them the opportunity to apply technical communication principles through a number of portfolio-building projects. Lecture/Lab.

COMM 342 Environmental Communication 3 cr.

Explores the communicative practices of activists, advocates, consumers, corporations, governmental organizations, and the public about the impact of human behavior on the Earth. Concern with changes in the environment caused by human behavior has permeated all layers of human society. Grounded in a strategic communication/rhetorical approach to environmentalism, the course engages praxis -- theory-informed action -- to examine construction of strategic persuasive messages about the environment designed to bring about behavioral change. Lecture.

COMM 350 Communication & Community Relations 3 cr.

Explores community relations efforts as they are implemented by Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC)/public relations professionals in nonprofit, corporate, agency, and governmental organizations. Community relations is a vital part of corporate communication's management function to lead, motivate, persuade, and inform its various publics. Hence, it is an important fact of the public relations function of integrated marketing communication. Lecture.

COMM 353 Oral Interpretation of Literature 3 cr.

Analyzes literature from all genres for purposes of reading aloud, a skill which is both an art in itself and a useful discipline for announcers and actors. Lecture.

COMM 387 Event Planning: Communication Architecture 3 cr.

Focuses on designing integrated communciation approaches for implementation in specific contexts such as conferences, professional meetings, celebratory events, and programs for community outreach. Working from a theory-informed action (praxis) approach, students engage the professional, interpersonal, and organizational coordination of information, people and budget(s). Lecture.

COMM 388 Corporate & Integrated Marketing Communication Research 3 cr.

Examines the role of research within corporate and integrated marketing communication activities. Qualitative and quantitative methods, such as processes for structuring and conducting focus groups, sampling, measurement, research design, and basic data analysis, will be addressed. Lecture.

COMM 401 Rhetoric & Philosophy of Technology 3 cr.

Examines the communication dynamics of technological developments in historical periods. Students analyze the effects of technologized symbolic communication upon individuals and the societies in which they are situated. Lecture.

COMM 402 Argumentation 3 cr.

Applies the methods and principles of argumentation theory and practices, including deliberative rhetoric. Emphasizes creating, advocating, defending, and refuting social propositions and claims. Lecture.

COMM 404 Intercultural Communication Perspectives 3 cr.

This course provides a foundation for the understanding and practice of intercultural communication from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives. Lecture.

COMM 406 Political Communication 3 cr.

Examines the gamut of public political debate in the light of historical origins and development in the context of rhetorical and political theory. Lecture.

COMM 407 Intercultural Communication 3 cr.

Exposes the student to the importance of communication among and between politically, culturally, and ethnically diverse people as a bridge to understanding in an increasingly multi-cultural world. This course explores the role of interpersonal perception in communicating with persons from varied cultures, and allows the student to apply these understandings in their own lives. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

COMM 408 Rhetoric, Society, and the Marketplace 3 cr.

Examines the marketplace as historically situated and rhetorically constructed - specifically critiquing modern understanding of the marketplace and marketplace behavior as built on a non-ethical, physical science foundation in contrast to an ethical, Aristotelian foundation. Lecture.

COMM 411W Rhetorical Criticism 3 cr.

Examines critical methods and approaches to the study and analysis of rhetorical acts, movements, and speeches. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

COMM 414 Rhetoric, Religion, & Society 3 cr.

Seeks to understand religion, not as a psychological experience, nor even as a set of doctrine or beliefs, but as a rhetorical symbolizing of experience. The aim of this course is to introduce how the rhetoric of religious symbols influence and enrich our daily living. The centrality of rhetorical symbolism to religion is evident whenever we think about the activities most often associated with religious practice. Lecture.

COMM 417 Multinational Communication 3 cr.

Focuses on the similarities and differences in the way people from different nations think, act and negotiate. Lecture.

COMM 418W Conflict Management in Organizations 3 cr.

Examines the role of communication in managing and regulating interpersonal and organizational conflict. Application to conflict in everyday interpersonal and professional communicative interaction is explored. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

COMM 421 Communication and Gender 3 cr.

Examines research addressing differences and similarities in male and female communication syles in a variety of contexts, ranging from personal to social to work relationships, with attention given to philosophical and narrative understandings of what it means to be male and female persons. Lecture.

COMM 422 Communication Research Methods 3 cr.

Prepares students to interpret and design qualitative and quantitative research in the field of communication. Attention is given to experimental design, surveys/questionnaires, and qualitative methods of research within the context of asking and answering questions about communication processes and preparing research reports. Course may include design of a study and interpretation of results. Lecture.

COMM 426 Free Speech & Responsibility 3 cr.

Explores the rhetorical interplay between free speech and communicative responsibility. Historical cases and contemporary issues in free speeech are examined from a standpoint of communicative responsibility. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

COMM 427 Communication Management 3 cr.

Introduces the communication professional to the principles of managerial communication. Theory and application of managerial best practices are discussed. Students focus on scholarship of managerial communication and discuss differing managerial styles in relation to different corporate structures. Lecture.

COMM 430 Integrated Marketing Communication Strategies I: PR 3 cr.

Instructs students in the principles of Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) for Public Relations contexts. Interpersonal, organizational and managerial strategies are integrated through theories of persuasion. Students learn rhetorical versatility and responsiveness in managing dialogue with diverse publics. This versatility is based on principles of persuasion, intercultural communication and crisis communication management for organizations. This course prepares students for advanced internships and employment in integrated marketing communication contexts. Lecture.

COMM 432 IMC: Brand, Identity, Reputation 3 cr.

In corporate and integrated marketing communication contexts, leveraging a company's name, core values, and visual representation in all communication and business-related matters both internally and externally requires careful consideration of a three-fold relationship: identity, brand and reputation. This course explores these three facets of organizational development by looking to the philosophy of communication and to the industry commentary for insight into their complex yet essential relationship. The goal of this class is to consider the way in which identity, brand, and reputation work together to build dynamic and sustainable organizations. Lecture.

COMM 433 Integrated Marketing Communication Strategies II: AD 3 cr.

Instructs students in the principles of integrated marketing communication for advertising contexts. Advertising is explored as a persuasive, rhetorical activity. Students learn rhetorical versatility and responsiveness in constructing messages for diverse audiences through principles of intercultural communication in the global marketplace. Prepares students for advanced internships and employment in integrated marketing communication contexts. Lecture.

COMM 435 Integrated Marketing Communication: Social Modalities 3 cr.

Integrated Marketing Communication: Social Modalities examines how social technologies influence communication practices in the for-profit and non-profit sectors. This course takes a philosophical and applied approach to understanding how social modalities "story" our engagement with the marketplace. Lecture.

COMM 436 Integrated Marketing Communication: Coordinating AD/PR 3 cr.

Covers the principles and practices of marketing communication. Emphasizes a comprehensive, integrated approach to the total coordinated integrated marketing communication mix including advertising, public relations, sales, promotion, personal selling, and interactive strategies. Lecture.

COMM 438 Integrated Marketing Communication: Interactive Strategies 3 cr.

Examines theoretical and practical communicative strategies behind interactive marketing. This course will challenge students to apply communication theory in order to support and articulate the role of online strategies in integrated campaign planning. In addition, students will gain a comprehensive understanding of how to think about the implementation of strategic interactive tactics through hands-on projects. Lecture.

COMM 439 Integrated Marketing Communication RFP's: AD/PR 3 cr.

Examines a crucial stage of the persuasive communication in Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC): responding to RFPs, or "Requests for Proposals." Teaches students to apply strategies of analysis, persuasion, and public speaking/presentations in diverse interpersonal and public contexts. Students plan integrated adverstising and/or public relations campaigns, learning the importance of audience analysis, principles of intercultural communication, and interpretation of institutional/organizational discourse as they learn to "pitch" proposals to potential clients. Lecture.

COMM 440 Communication Ethics & Technology 3 cr.

Examines the implications of technology for communication ethics. Technology's impact on interpersonal, organizational, and public communication is addressed. Lecture.

COMM 445 Non-Profit Development & Philanthropy Communication 3 cr.

Identifies the components of a strategic plan, comprehensive development initatives, income-producing initiatives, and non-profit organizational structure, history, and ethics from the perspective of theory-informed action, or praxis. Students will develop grant-writing skills and learn to analyze the stakeholder context of non-profit organizations from a corporate communication perspective. Lecture.

COMM 454 Interpersonal Communication 3 cr.

Examines communication between persons in the context of a variety of public and private human relationships from philosophical and theoretical standpoints. Lecture.

COMM 454W Interpersonal Communication 3 cr.

Examines communication between persons in the context of a variety of public and private human relationships from philosophical and theoretical standpoints. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

COMM 455 Small Group & Team Communication 3 cr.

Examines communication processes in small groups. Includes discussion of group formation, structure, decision-making, errors in decision-making, interaction models, conflict, and methods of doing research in and about small groups. Lecture.

COMM 456W Organizational Communication 3 cr.

Examines current research in organizational communication. Topics include organizational socialization, decision-making, leadership, functionalist, interpretive, and cultural perspectives, systems and information processing approaches, communication networks, structure and environment, and other classic and contemporary issues. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

COMM 457 Communication, Science & Revolution 3 cr.

Examines the relationship between the rhetoric of science and the rhetoric of revolution in the context of the modern worldview arising out of the Enlightenment. Lecture.

COMM 458 Rhetoric of Popular Culture 3 cr.

Examines documents of popular culture that reinforce through rhetorical means modern and postmodern worldviews as experienced in popular consciousness. Covers the rhetorical-communication theories of the Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, Bacon, Ramus, Burke, Perlman, Ong and Hudson. Lecture.

COMM 459 Philosophy of Communication 3 cr.

Explores the assumptions and presuppositions about communication found in philosophical studies of communication. Addresses topics such as meaning, interpretation, representation, and speech acts. Lecture.

COMM 460 Seminar: Mission & Identity 3 cr.

Consists of revolving topics and authors interested in the interplay of communication and religion within culture, society and community. This seminar examines topics and authors supportive of the Catholic mission of the Spiritan Fathers. Lecture.

COMM 461 Rhetorical Theory 3 cr.

Provides a theoretical introduction to classical through contemporary rhetorical theory and action. Examines primary and secondary texts. Lecture.

COMM 463 Strategic Corporate Communication 3 cr.

Examines theoretical and applied strategic management of communication in profit and not-for-profit corporate settings critical for organizational success at all levels. Topics include strategic message production for internal and external audiences, including employees, investors, and other stakeholders. Lecture.

COMM 484 Health Communication 3 cr.

Examines communication theory and research in a variety of health care contexts, including interpersonal, small group, team, organizational, and public communication. Lecture.

COMM 486 Organizational Consulting 3 cr.

Provides an introduction to organizational intervention through communication-based training and development programs. Specific topics covered may include organizational audit techniques and adult learning theory, as well as designing, conducting, and evaluating several different types of training efforts. Lecture.

COMM 490 Special Topics-Communication 3 cr.

Check the semester course offerings for special classes offered. Lecture.

COMM 494 Communication Ethics 3 cr.

Explores theoretical and applied issues surrounding ethical decisions in relational, organizational, and public communication contexts. Emphasis is placed on identifying "the good" that underlies various approaches to communication ethics and that emerge in narratives that guide personal and professional life. Lecture.

COMM 494W Communication Ethics 3 cr.

Explores theoretical and applied issues surrounding ethical decisions in relational, organizational, and public communication contexts. Emphasis is placed on identifying "the good" that underlies various approaches to communication ethics and that emerge in narratives that guide personal and professional life. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

COMM 495W 3 cr.

Integrates knowledge obtained in previous coursework and builds on that conceptual foundation through communicative praxis, employing integrative analysis, narrative-driven thinking, application, and ethical reflection. Students assemble and analyze a portfolio showcasing outcomes of their coursework in the major. Grade is based on critical analysis and reflective engagement of segments of the portfolio representing various elements of communicative praxis and of the portfolio as a whole. Students receive formative feedback on each segment of their writing project for purposes of revision. Students must have completed the bulk of their coursework before enrolling in this class. Concurrent enrollment in 6 credits of communication coursework is permitted. Lecture, Online. University Core Writing Intens.

COMM 496 Directed Readings 1 TO 6 cr.

Offers the opportunity for students and faculty to conduct in-depth study of a topic not covered, or covered only briefly, in other departmental courses. Readings.

COMM 497 Special Projects 1 TO 6 cr.

Offers the opportunity for students to practice communication applications commissioned by University or community organizations. Lecture.

COMM 498 Internship 1 TO 6 cr.

Provides a supervised observation/experience program of study (assignment and performance) in areas such as integrated marketing communication, public relations and advertising, human resources, promotions, event planning, and other related areas of applied communication. Internship.

COMM 499 Directed Studies 1 TO 6 cr.

Offers the opportunity for students and faculty to conduct in- depth study of a topic not covered, or covered only briefly, in other departmental courses. Lecture.

CORE 161 Arts and the Human Experience 3 cr.

The visual and musical arts are explored in light of major styles, artists, themes and monuments in the arts and as components of a broader historical and cultural experience. The course draws upon the rich resources of the Pittsburgh community such as the Carnegie Institute, the Pittsburgh Symphony, the Pittsburgh Ballet, and the Pittsburgh Opera. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

COSC 100 Elements of Computer Science 2 cr.

A survey of topics necessary for basic computer literacy. Includes laboratory exercises. Credit not given to computer science majors or minors. Lecture.

COSC 101 Basic Programming 3 cr.

Computer programming in Visual Basic. Algorithm development and data representation. Credit not given to computer science majors or minors. Lecture.

COSC 130 Fundamentals of the Internet 3 cr.

Technical concepts of electronic mail, web browsing concepts and advanced features, HTML and web page design, technical concepts of the Internet, advanced Internet services, concepts and issues in electronic publishing, ethics and security issues. Prerequisite: 030 or equivalent. Lecture.

COSC 135 Introduction to Computer Science 3 cr.

An introduction to fundamental computer science concepts for non-computer science majors. Provides high-level coverage of topics that may include Operating Systems (such as Windows), Programming Languages, Software Engineering, Computer Graphics, Artificial Intelligence, the Internet and World Wide Web, Computer Architecture (such as those from Intel), Algorithms and Problem Solving, Data Storage, Computer Security, and Social and Ethical Aspects of Computing. Lecture.

COSC 145 Algorithmic Thinking 3 cr.

Computers have made possible new ways of thinking about how to solve problems. This course introduces this style of thinking to students from any discipline by applying tools and techniques designed for beginners to engaging in problems. Topics include basics of algorithm design and development, abstraction, modularization, information organization, and object-oriented concepts. Lecture.

COSC 150 Computer Programming: C++ 3 cr.

Object oriented programming, objects and classes, data abstraction, functions, looping, selections, control structures, arrays, searching, and sorting. Credit is not allowed for both 150 and 160. Lecture.

COSC 160 Scientific Programming: Java 3 cr.

Object oriented programming, objects and classes, data abstraction, functions, looping, selections, control structures, arrays, searching, and sorting in an environment with scientific and mathematical applications. Credit is not allowed for both 150 and 160. Lecture.

COSC 215 Java With Data Structures 3 cr.

Data abstraction, queues, linked lists, recursion, stacks, trees, string processing, searching and sorting, and hashing. Java API support for data structures. .Prerequisites: 160 and Math 135 (May be taken concurrently). Lecture.

COSC 220 Computer Organization and Assembly Language 3 cr.

Basic structure of computer hardware and software, data representation, addresses and instructions, control structures, device drivers, files, and macros. Prerequisite: 215. Lecture.

COSC 250 Content Management Systems 3 cr.

Students will utilize one or more open source Content Management Systems to create websites that make it possible for non-technical users to publish content to a website. The content is saved in a database and may include text, images, video clips and so on. Lecture.

COSC 260 Concepts of Information Assurance 3 cr.

This course builds a basic cross-disciplinary understanding of how computers and networks work, of the role of information assurance, of the key principles of confidentiality, integrity and access, and of major technologies for securing these principles such as security models, cryptography, authentication issues, access control, intrusion detection, auditing and damage control. Students will learn about the societal/organizational risks associated with a lack of information assurance, including case studies and/or examples of security breaches and their consequences. Credit is not allowed for both 260 and 460. Prerequisite:160 Lecture.

COSC 300 Advanced Data Structures 3 cr.

Data organization, connections between the design of algorithms and the efficient implementation and manipulation of data structures. Abstract data types, tries, B-trees, and graphs. Prerequisite: 215 Lecture.

COSC 305 Digital Logic 3 cr.

Boolean algebra and logic gates, combinational logic, decoders, encoders, multiplexers, registers, counters, memory units, flip-flops, algorithmic state machines, and digital integrated circuits. Prerequisite: 220 Lecture.

COSC 308 Numerical Analysis 3 cr.

Linear systems, interpolation, functional approximation, numeric differentiation and integration, and solutions to non-linear equations May be counted as either mathematics or computer science, but not both. Prerequisites: 150/160 and Math 116. Lecture.

COSC 311 Systems Programming and Design 3 cr.

Interaction between software and hardware components in an integrated system, program translation issues, assemblers, linkers, loaders, and compilers. Prerequisite: 220. Lecture.

COSC 325W Operating Systems and Computer Architecture 3 cr.

Organization of operating systems and basic computer architecture. Implementing multiprogramming, memory management, communicating with input/output devices, concurrency, synchronization, file systems and scheduling the processor. Prerequisite: 220. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

COSC 340 Problem Solving Seminar 1 cr.

Solution and discussion of problems from the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest and other sources. Permission of instructor required. Prerequisite: 300 Corequisite: 325W Lecture.

COSC 350W Computers and Humanity 3 cr.

An exploration of the impact of computers on present and future society including sociological and philosophical issues in computer science. Prerequisite: One course in Computer Science on the 200 level. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

COSC 401 Data Base Management Systems 3 cr.

The use, design, and implementation of database management systems. Topics include data models, current DBMS implementations, and data description, manipulation, and query languages. Prerequisite: 300. Lecture.

COSC 410 Artificial Intelligence 3 cr.

Knowledge representation and natural language processing, search strategies, design and applications of heuristics, expert systems, and applications. Prerequisite: 300. Lecture.

COSC 418 Formal Languages and Automata 3 cr.

Formal languages and their relation to automata. The Chomsky language hierarchy, recognition of languages by automata, Turing machines, decidability, and computability. Prerequisite: 220. Lecture.

COSC 425 Computer Graphics 3 cr.

Geometric generation of two- and three-dimensional graphics. Scan conversion, geometric transformation, clipping, interaction, curves and surfaces, and animation. Prerequisite: 300. Lecture.

COSC 430 Web-Based Systems 3 cr.

HTTP/HTML, client server scripting, active server/CGI technology, data store access/ modification, cascading style sheets, and accessing the browser document object model. Prerequisite: 300. Lecture.

COSC 435 Theory of Programming Languages 3 cr.

Syntactic and semantic issues in program language definition and implementation. Static vs. dynamic properties, parameter passing, recursion, and language comparisons. Prerequisite: 300. Lecture.

COSC 445W Systems Analysis and Software Design 3 cr.

Methods and tools for the structuring and modular design of large systems, organization and techniques of team programming, design evaluation and validation. Prerequisite: 300. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

COSC 450 Computer Networks 3 cr.

Network technologies, protocols, and management. Programming networked applications. The effects of the Internet and World Wide Web on computing and society. Prerequisites: 300 and 325W. Lecture.

COSC 460 Computer Security 3 cr.

Network, database, and Web security, threat models, elementary and advanced cryptology, protocol analysis, covert channels, access control and trust issues, legal and ethical issues in security.Prerequisite: 325W. Lecture.

COSC 480W Senior Project 1 TO 3 cr.

An individual or group project involving a significant programming component, documentation, and written report on a topic of current interest in computer science. Prerequisites: Senior Status and 300. Independent Study. University Core Writing Intens.

COSC 491 Selected Topics in Computer Science I 1 cr.

Topics selected in consultation with the advisor. Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson. Lecture.

COSC 492 Selected Topics in Computer Science II 2 cr.

Topics selected in consultation with the advisor. Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson. Lecture.

COSC 493 Selected Topics in Computer Science III 3 cr.

Topics selected in consultation with the advisor. Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson. Lecture.

CPLA 380W Prior Learning Assessment 3 cr.

This course is designed to help students explore and document past knowledge that they have gained in job-related or other life situations for which they may be able to receive college level credit. Prior learning, not merely having had an experience, is the focus of this course. Online. University Core Writing Intens.

CPRG 101 Adult Transition Seminar 3 cr.

In this course you will sample the college environment while you explore and sharpen your academic skills. Selected reading from many disciplines will be followed by a variety of writing assignments. Other exercises will be included which will focus on developing your skills in writing, reasoning and critical thinking. Lecture, Online.

CPRG 105 Information Literacy for Adult Learners 3 cr.

This course introduces students to information literacy skills for academic success and lifelong learning. By completing a variety of course assignments, students will learn how to use information technology to find and access information appropriate for their needs. They will also hone their critical thinking skills to evaluate information in different contexts. Other class activities will focus on using information ethically and effectively. Lecture. University Core Info Literacy.

CPRO 201 Accounting for the Professional I 3 cr.

An introduction to the basic vocabulary of accounting and to financial statement analysis. These courses will emphasize the understanding of financial information for effective organizational leadership. Lecture, Online.

CPRO 202 Accounting for the Professional II 3 cr.

An introduction to the basic vocabulary of accounting and to financial statement analysis. These courses will emphasize the understanding of financial information for effective organizational leadership. Lecture, Online.

CPRO 204 Statistical Analysis and Research Methods 3 cr.

A course focusing on research and quantitative methods in the social sciences. Students will learn appropriate techniques for data gathering and analysis. Topics include: survey formulation, statistical approaches (includes regression analysis) and the use of statistical software packages in research. Lecture, Online.

CPRO 231 Microeconomics 3 cr.

An analysis of prices, output, and income distribution through the interaction of households and business firms in a free-enterprise economy. Government interventional and alternative systems are examined. Lecture, Online.

CPRO 232 Macroeconomics 3 cr.

The theory of the determination of national income, unemployment, and inflation and its implications for public policy. Lecture, Online.

CPRO 261W Structure of the Legal Environment 3 cr.

An examination of the legal and regulatory environment in which organizations must function. Special attention will be given to ethical consideration and social and political influences as they affect such organizations. Lecture, Online. University Core Writing Intens.

CPRO 300 Great American Short Stories 3 cr.

This course surveys the best in American short fiction from the 19th century to the present day. Students will read and discuss a sampling of short stories from a diverse range of authors and become familiar with the literary periods and historical movements from which these stories emerge. Course requirements will include manageable weekly reading requirements, class discussion, two formal essays and one group project. Online.

CPRO 350 Understanding the Marketplace and Competition 3 cr.

This course will explore basic concepts, principles and activities involved in modern marketing: planning, analyzing market opportunities, selecting target markets, developing the marketing mix, and managing the marketing effort. Lecture, Online.

ECON 121W Elements of Economics 3 cr.

Economics 121 is an introductory course in economics intended to afford an understanding of how our economic system works, of the forces which affect the level, composition, and distribution of the output of the economy, and the issues behind current economic problems. The course content will define concepts, provide background materials, and develop economic ideas necessary to an understanding of the policy issues constantly before a complex dynamic economy. Not counted toward a degree in the School of Business Administration. Offered every year. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens, Theme Area Social Justice.

ECON 201 Principles of Micro Economics 3 cr.

This course introduces students to the way in which a free market economic system resolves the basic social questions of what goods and services to produce, how scarce resources are organized to produce these goods, and to whom the goods are distributed once they are produced. Students will explore the components of the market system, supply and demand, and how they interact under conditions ranging from perfect competition to monopoly. Lecture.

ECON 202 Principles of Micro Economics 3 cr.

This course introduces students to the basic economic principles of the aggregate economy. Students will explore the determinants of, and relationships among, the level of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), unemployment, inflation, foreign trade and interest rates. In addition, various theories of the role of fiscal and monetary policy to promote stabilization will be addressed. Lecture.

ECON 210 Exploring Liberty 3 cr.

This course explores political and economic and religious notions about liberty. Do certain political or economic arrangements foster liberty? Can the political set up be kept independent from the economic scheme, or are these intimately connected? What is the role of religion in a political community? Do existing theories adequately elucidate current situations? Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

ECON 301W Intermediate Microeconomics 3 cr.

The purpose of this course is to develop the analytical skills required for dealing with problems of economic behavior and resource allocation, along with an appreciation of the methodological issues involved in modern economic analysis. The course covers the traditional body of microeconomic theory, including: utility theory and consumer behavior, the analysis of production and the behavior of the firm, coordination in product and factor markets under perfect competition, and the impact on market operations of monopoly, imperfect competition, externalities, asymmetric information, and public goods. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ECON 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 cr.

This course provides the advanced economic student with a rigorous set of tools with which to evaluate the performance of the U.S. economy, both as a closed entity and as member of the global economy. On the theoretical side, the course evaluates competing theories of income, inflation, and employment. On the application side, students will be expected to find and empirically evaluate aggregate data. Lecture.

ECON 328 Urban Land Economics 3 cr.

This course is a study of the economic forces that influence the location of business and residential location in a metropolitan area. Specific areas of study include transportation, housing, poverty, and the urban public sector. Lecture.

ECON 332 Money and Financial Markets 3 cr.

This course examines the influence of monetary policy on such variables as the nominal interest rate, level of income, inflation rate, foreign exchange rate, etc. Specific topics include bank portfolio management, interest rate risk, the yield curve, real versus nominal interest rates, financial intermediation, etc. Lecture.

ECON 342 Global Economic Perspectives 3 cr.

This course uses the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics to evaluate and analyze current global economic events. The course presents the plusses and minuses of globalization, an introduction to international trade and finance, a comparison of different economic systems and philosophies, and alternative theories of global poverty and economic development. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

ECON 381 Econometrics 3 cr.

Econometrics is the application of statistical methods for the purpose of testing economic and business theories. This course will introduce students to the skills used in empirical research including, but not limited to, data collection, hypothesis testing, model specification, regression analysis, violations of regression assumptions and corrections, dummy variables and limited dependent variable models. Extensive focus will be on the intuition and application of econometric methods, and as a result, statistical software will be used extensively. Students will be required to complete an independent research project involving the application of regression analysis. Lecture.

ECON 384 Forecasting 3 cr.

In this course, students learn how to apply statistical and econometric tools in an attempt to forecast economic and business data. Drawing on techniques learned in Econometrics, students collect data, build forecasts, evaluate the forecasts, and apply economic theory and econometric techniques to refine the forecasts. Emphasis is placed equally on the student correctly performing and concisely communicating the forecasts. Lecture.

ECON 398 The American Economy 3 cr.

The American Economy reviews chronologically the history of the United States from the pre-colonial period until the present from an economic perspective. Students will use the fundamental principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics to analyze key events in American history - all from an economic perspective - and relate their implications for the future. Lecture.

ECON 401 Game Theory 3 cr.

Game theory is a mathematical method of modeling virtually any situation in which humans interact and it has found applications in virtually every aspect of the social sciences. This course will examine the fundamental tools and concepts of game theory while maintaining a focus on its applications in economics and business. Lecture.

ECON 420 Labor Economics 3 cr.

This course is an analysis of the principles of wage and employment determination in the U.S. economy under nonunion conditions as well as under collective bargaining arrangements. The factors underlying labor demand and supply are studied with an emphasis on a human capital approach to relative earnings differentials. Issues of labor market discriminations are also analyzed. Lecture.

ECON 425 Current Economic Issues 3 cr.

This course focuses on specific current economic issues. The course and its content vary. For example, topics might include the federal budget deficit, economics and politics, or global economic changes. Lecture.

ECON 431 Environmental Economics 3 cr.

This course uses benefit cost analysis to explain the reasons for environmental pollution and to evaluate the efficiency of alternative abatement strategies and policies. Topics include air and water pollution, toxic waste cleanup, and alternative methods of valuing non-market resources such as clean air, public lands, and other natural resources. Lecture.

ECON 442 International Economics 3 cr.

The course covers international trade theory and international monetary economics. Topics discussed include the classical and neoclassical theory of comparative advantage, balance of trade, balance of payments, custom's union theory, commerical policy, theory of foreign exchange markets, history of international monetary system, fixed versus flexible exchange rates. Offered every year. Lecture.

ECON 453 Public Economics 3 cr.

This course teaches students how to apply economic principles in order to analyze and evaluate public expenditure and tax policies. Because value judgments are implicit in any type of analysis, students will be encouraged to consider the equity-efficiency tradeoff associated with many public policy decisions. Lecture.

ECON 462 Industrial Organization 3 cr.

Industrial Organization is an applications-oriented course examining the relationship between the market sector and government policy. The course will address social regulation, traditional economic regulation and antitrust, economic deregulation, and selected topics. Lecture.

ECON 480W Senior Thesis Economics 3 cr.

The purpose of this course is to sharpen the students' independent research skills utilizing all of the concepts, tools and techniques learned throughout the economics major. The course focuses on choosing research topics, framing research questions, developing research strategies, collecting data, writing reports, and presenting results. During the term, students undertake a substantive independent research project culminating in both a formal written paper and an oral research presentation to the economics faculty Seminar. University Core Writing Intens.

EDFD 203 Field Observation I 1 cr.

The Leading Teacher Program provides electives in which students may gain additional experience observing teachers and students in basic education. These observations may include settings in public and private schools and educational institutions and organizations. Students will complete fifteen hours during the semester. A written report of the observations, using Performance Indicators for Organization, Classroom Environment, and/or Instructional Delivery, will be submitted to the Director of Field Placement at the conclusion of the experience. Field Work.

EDFD 204 Field Observation II 1 cr.

The Leading Teacher Program provides electives in which students may gain additional experience observing teachers and students in basic education. These observations may include settings in public and private schools and educational institutions and organizations. Students will complete fifteen hours during the semester. A written report of the observations, using Performance Indicators for Organization, Classroom Environment, and/or Instructional Delivery, will be submitted to the Director of Field Placement at the conclusion of the experience. Field Work.

EDFD 205 Field Observation III 1 cr.

The Leading Teacher Program provides electives in which students may gain additional experience observing teachers and students in basic education. These observations may include settings in public and private schools and educational institutions and organizations. Students will complete fifteen hours during the semester. A written report of the observations, using Performance Indicators for Organization, Classroom Environment, and/or Instructional Delivery, will be submitted to the Director of Field Placement at the conclusion of the experience. Field Work.

EDFD 206 Field Observation IV 1 cr.

The Leading Teacher Program provides electives in which students may gain additional experience observing teachers and students in basic education. These observations may include settings in public and private schools and educational institutions and organizations. Students will complete fifteen hours during the semester. A written report of the observations, using Performance Indicators for Organization, Classroom Environment, and/or Instructional Delivery, will be submitted to the Director of Field Placement at the conclusion of the experience. Field Work.

EDFD 207 Field Observation V 1 cr.

EDFD 207, Field Observation V helps students cultivate a repertoire of strategies to use in performing their tutorial service with students in grades K-12 as well as a sense of the importance of service within the community and lessons of civic responsibility. These strategies include lesson and session planning, communication skills, inter-cultural competence and are developed, through observations of tutoring sessions followed by several opportunities to tutor prior to and in preparation for a permanent assignment as a tutor. These experiences equip students to properly select, implement, and evaluate specific methods to use in their sessions and to enhance their work in the community through reflection activities such as readings, discussions, and poster sessions. Lecture.

EDFD 208 Field Observation VI 2 cr.

EDFD 208, Field Observation VI combines inside and outside of the classroom components. Students perform a minimum of 20 hours of service as tutors serving students in grades K-12. Service sites include schools and community agencies. In class, students engage in diverse experiences such as group discussions, journals, readings, and speaker presentations that reinforce and further develop skills and actively support their learning. The reading and discussion sequence in particular gives focus to meanings of civic engagement and encourages students to examine issues of social justice and connect them to their service experiences. Field Work.

EDFD 209 Field Observation VII 3 cr.

EDFD 209 Field Observation combines the course content of 207 and 208 Field Observation into a one-semester experience. The first half of the semester focuses on students cultivating a repertoire of strategies to use in performing their tutorial service with students in grades K-12 as well as a sense of the importance of service within the community and lessons of civic responsibility. These strategies include lesson and session planning, communication skills, inter-cultural competence and are developed, through observations of tutoring sessions. These experiences equip students to properly select, implement, and evaluate specific methods to use in their sessions and to enhance their work in the community through reflection activities such as readings, discussions, and poster sessions. During the second part of the course, students perform a minimum of 20 hours of service as tutors. Service sites include schools and community agencies. Field Work.

EDLC 302 Integrated Curriculum 3 cr.

This course is designed to examine issues, trends and techniques involved in the inclusion of children with special needs in early childhood settings. Candidates will explore educational implications of common disability areas. Candidates will explore specific adaptations of curriculum, materials, techniques, and environments that could be used to support inclusion. Candidates will observe and interact with children presenting a variety of developmental levels and needs in a supervised practicum experience. Lecture.

EDLC 305 Play, Movement and Nutrition 3 cr.

Placing play at the center of the curriculum for young children has historically been a major focus of early childhood education. This course is designed to enable candidates to understand the value of play in a child's overall development. This course is designed for candidates to plan, implement, and evaluate developmentally appropriate experiences in play, movement, and nutrition for children ages birth through eight. Lecture.

EDLC 480 Independent Study I 1 TO 3 cr.

With permission of an instructor and approval of the Dean, seniors may pursue indepth study of a subject area or engage in individual projects related to their professional goals. Independent Study.

EDLC 493 Student Teaching-ECE 6 cr.

Student teaching is a ten-week experience in Early Childhood and a ten-week experience in Elementary or Secondary Education or International. This course is for students who will complete the requirements in two certification areas. Registration is concurrent with 493 in another program. Student Teaching.

EDLE 480 Independent Study I 0 TO 3 cr.

With permission of an instructor and approval of the Dean, seniors may pursue indepth study of a subject area or engage in individual projects related to their professional goals. Independent Study.

EDLE 492 Student Teaching - Elementary 12 cr.

Student teaching is a fifteen week experience in an approved elementary school or middle school under the direct supervision of a cooperating teacher and a University supervisor. Student Teaching.

EDLE 493 Student Teaching - Elementary 6 cr.

Student teaching for dual certification is a ten-week experience in Early Childhood and a ten-week experience in Elementary or Secondary Education. This course is for students who will complete the requirements for certification in Elementary Education and Early Childhood or Secondary Education. Registration for each student teaching experience is concurrent. Student teaching is shared between a NAEYC accredited early childhood classroom or setting and an elementary or secondary classroom under the direct supervision of a cooperating teacher and a University supervisor. Student Teaching.

EDLS 301 Content Area Reading 3 cr.

Encompasses teaching and learning strategies, classroom diversity, instructional scaffolding and assessment, learning with printed and electronic texts, and the development of skill sets related to writing, talking, and listening in classroom learning environments. Prepares candidates to integrate knowledge of reading as it relates to content areas. Lecture.

EDLS 301W 3 cr.

Encompasses teaching and learning strategies, classroom diversity, instructional scaffolding and assessment, learning with printed and electronic texts, and the development of skill sets related to writing, talking, and listening in classroom learning environments. Prepares candidates to integrate knowledge of reading as it relates to content areas. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

EDLS 336 Teaching Math in Grades 5-8 3 cr.

This course engages teaching candidates in developing the fundamental knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teaching mathematics in middle schools (grades 5-8) in ways that promote students' learning and understanding. The course content addresses state and national standards for teaching and learning mathematics, lesson planning, instructional strategies, assessment techniques, the use of technology in mathematics education, and differentiating to meet the needs of diverse learners. Lecture.

EDLS 340 Adolescent Literature 3 cr.

Evaluation and selection of books and related materials in the subject fields of science, arts and the humanities, with special reference to the interests of high and middle school youth. Lecture.

EDLS 341 Teaching Secondary School Mathematics 3 cr.

This course engages teaching candidates in developing the fundamental knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teaching mathematics in secondary schools (grades 9-12) in ways that promote students' learning and understanding. The course content addresses state and national standards for teaching and learning mathematics, lesson planning, instructional strategies, assessment techniques, the use of technology in mathematics education, and differentiating to meet the needs of diverse learners. Lecture.

EDLS 343 Teaching English and Communication in Secondary Schools 3 cr.

Examines various ways to teach literature, grammar, language, and composition; provides opportunity for teacher candidates to review the basics of grammar and composition and to develop unit and lesson plans for teaching at the secondary level. Lecture.

EDLS 345 Teaching Foreign Language K-12 3 cr.

Explores a variety of approaches for teaching foreign languages (K-12); grammar, structure, verbal exercises, and literature germane to the specific language to be taught will be discussed. Lecture.

EDLS 346 Teaching Social Studies in the Secondary Schools 3 cr.

This is a competency based course for social studies teacher candidates that develops knowledge of social studies curricula and methods through inquiry; provides media and technological experiences; and expands questioning, planning and evaluation skills. Application of content and pedagogy learned in class will occur in secondary classrooms. Lecture.

EDLS 398 Field Experience - Content Area Reading 0 cr.

Each field experience provides the opportunity for teacher candidates to reflect critically on their developing knowledge base and practical experiences in relation to the content of the course and subject area. These experiences are designed to foster personal and professional growth in preparation for student teaching and entry into the teaching profession. Field Work.

EDLS 399 Field Experience - Teaching Methods 0 cr.

This field experience provides the opportunity for teacher candidates to apply what is being learned in professional preparation methods courses and to reflect critically on their developing skill in teaching with practical experiences in relation to the content of the course and subject area. These experiences are designed to foster personal and professional growth in preparation for student teaching and entry into the teaching profession. Field Work.

EDLS 480 Independent Study I 1 TO 3 cr.

With permission of an instructor and approval of the Dean, seniors may pursue indepth study of a subject area or engage in individual projects related to their professional goals. Independent Study.

EDLS 492 Student Teaching - Secondary or K-12 12 cr.

The capstone experience of the LTP is student teaching. Student teaching is a 15-week experience in an approved secondary school under the direct supervision of a cooperating teacher and a University supervisor. Student Teaching.

EDLS 493 Student Teaching - Secondary or K-12 6 cr.

If a candidate is pursuing dual certification, student teaching is a ten-week experience in Secondary Education and a ten-week experience in the second certification area. This 6 credit student teaching option is for students who will complete the requirements for certification in two areas. Registration for each student teaching experience is concurrent. Opportunities for student teaching abroad are available. For more information, see the section titled, International Study in Education. Student Teaching.

EDLT 101 Instructional Technology I 1 cr.

Introduces the aspiring teacher to the skills required for modeling and demonstrating technologies in the classroom. Competencies center around the use of technology to communicate and interact with peers and colleagues and include an orientation to personal computers and the campus network, electronic mail, word processing, graphics presentation, and the uses of Internet for exploration and research. Lecture.

EDLT 102 Instructional Technology II 1 cr.

Provides the aspiring teacher with the set of technology- based tools required to integrate technology into the curriculum. Advanced features of word processing, graphics presentation, and the Internet are presented. In addition, online lesson plans, content-rich images, and related digitized resource materials are harvested from the World Wide Web and incorporated into classroom ready instructional materials. Lecture.

EDLT 301 Instructional Technology III: Text-Based Instruction 3 cr.

Examines the design, integration, and evaluation of text-based printed and graphics materials including content-specific hand- outs, student workbooks, and lesson study guides. In addition, students prepare comprehensive curriculum-based lessons using a variety of commonly accepted instructional technologies, including digitized resources found on the most acknowledged educational sites on the Internet. These resources will be firmly grounded in accepted academic standard and assessment. Upon completion of the course, approved materials are uploaded to the School of Education server for access by practicing teachers. Lecture.

EDLT 302 Electronic Literacy for IT 3 cr.

Increases the level of technology competencies with an examination of visual-based instructional materials including age-appropriate classroom presentations, interactive instructional media, forms-based text documents and professional development portfolios. Teacher candidates complete a visual-based unit of instruction and present their results in a typical classroom environment; create a computer-based portfolio depicting notable educational achievements, suitable for presentation during formal interviews; and continue their research to determine the effectiveness of their presentations. Lecture.

EDLT 401 Instructional Technology IV 3 cr.

Examines the design and implementation of Web-based instruction. Teacher candidates compose a personal home page and several prototype course web pages supporting different academic disciplines. Internal (student-made) and external (Internet-ready) links to the Web are incorporated into the pages after considerable research of content material. Candidates continue to investigate the effectiveness of their presentations via research assessment procedures. Lecture.

EINT 493 Student Teaching-England 6 cr.

Students who plan to student teach may fulfill part of their student teaching requirement by student teaching for 10 weeks in England. Student Teaching.

EINT 494 Student Teaching-Ireland 6 cr.

Students who plan to student teach may fulfill part of their student teaching requirement by student teaching for 10 weeks in Ireland. Student Teaching.

EINT 497 Student Teaching-Italy 6 cr.

Students who plan to student teach may fulfill part of their student teaching requirement by student teaching for 10 weeks in Italy. Student Teaching.

ENGL 101 Multi-Genre Creative Writing 3 cr.

This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of creative writing forms—poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction—by examining various craft elements (character, voice, point of view, setting, etc.) and trying to understand how the lessons learned about these in one genre can be helpful when trying to write in another. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

ENGL 102 Special Studies: Global Diversity and Literature 3 cr.

This course introduces students to the relationship between global issues of diversity and works of literature. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

ENGL 110C Literature East and West 3 cr.

Literature East and West is an introduction to the modern literature of Asia, with particular emphasis on the differences between Eastern and Western ideas about self and community. Many of the readings reflect the problems that non-western cultures have when confronted with the pervasive western challenges to traditional values. Poems, short stories, and novels will be supplemented with viewings of two films. Readings will include three contemporary Japanese and Chinese novels. This is a Learning Community course. Lecture.

ENGL 111C Drama & Cultural Contexts 3 cr.

In this course students read a variety of plays in order to explore questions about class, race, gender, identity, politics and desire. Students read plays, have lively discussions and debates, and investigate how drama and performance are an integral part of our everyday lives. This is a Learning Community course. Lecture.

ENGL 112C Special Studies: Culture and Literature 3 cr.

This course explores the aesthetic and social dimensions of American culture as represented in literature. This is a Learning Community course. Lecture.

ENGL 113C Special Studies: Diversity and Literature 3 cr.

This course explores issues of diversity and social justice in various literary genres, including the essay, the autobiography, the drama, and the novel. This is a Learning Community course. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

ENGL 150 World Literature 3 cr.

This course explores literature in a variety of genres from across the world in a global context. Lecture.

ENGL 201 Special Studies: Fiction 3 cr.

Examination of various types of fiction, emphasizing critical analysis and writing, as well as various thematic and conceptual issues. Individual courses may be organized around such topics as Form and Content in Short Fiction, Introduction to the Novel, Women and/in Fiction, the Gothic Novel. This is a Learning Community course. Lecture.

ENGL 201C Special Studies: Fiction 3 cr.

Examination of various types of fiction, emphasizing critical analysis and writing, as well as various thematic and conceptual issues. Individual courses may be organized around such topics as Form and Content in Short Fiction, Introduction to the Novel, Women and/in Fiction, the Gothic Novel. Lecture.

ENGL 202 Special Studies: Poetry 3 cr.

Examination of the formal and thematic dimensions of poetic expression. Individual courses may be organized around such topics as Form and Content in Poetry, Experimental Poetry, Poetry in Context, Women's Poetry. Lecture.

ENGL 202C Special Studies: Poetry 3 cr.

Examination of the formal and thematic dimensions of poetic expression. Individual courses may be organized around such topics as Form and Content in Poetry, Experimental Poetry, Poetry in Context, Women's Poetry. This is a Learning Community course. Lecture.

ENGL 203 Special Studies: Drama 3 cr.

Examination of the various modes and dimensions of dramatic expression. Individual courses may be organized around such topics as Western Drama from the Classics to the Moderns, Dramatic Literature and Theatrical Performance, Drama and Society. Lecture.

ENGL 203C Special Studies: Drama 3 cr.

Examination of the various modes and dimensions of dramatic expression. Individual courses may be organized around such topics as Western Drama from the Classics to the Moderns, Dramatic Literature and Theatrical Performance, Drama and Society. This is a Learning Community course. Lecture.

ENGL 204 Special Studies: Literature and Cultural Studies 3 cr.

Examination of literary expression through the lens of new perspectives in cultural studies. Individual courses may be organized around such topics as Literature and Power; Literature, Economics and Gender; Race, Class, and Literature. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

ENGL 205 Special Studies: Film 3 cr.

This course introduces students to cultural, aesthetic, and production issues in film. Lecture.

ENGL 206 Special Studies: Global Literature 3 cr.

Examination of literature from across the globe. One such course is Immigrant Experience Through Literature. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

ENGL 214W Survey of Non-Western Literature 3 cr.

This course examines representative translations and original works (both fiction and non-fiction) by non-western authors from Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe and Russia. The course stresses in- depth reading and concentrates on the interrelationships of literature and the social and cultural values and beliefs as reflected in literature. The course is organized thematically on topics such as Family and Cultural Ties, Coming of Age, Culture and Gender Roles, Work and Identity, Class and Caste, The Individual in Society, Exile, Customs and Rituals and The Spiritual Dimension. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 215W Survey of World Literature 3 cr.

A historical survey of western literature through the Renaissance. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 216W Literature of the Western World II 3 cr.

Historical survey of western literature since the Renaissance. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 217W Survey of British Literature I 3 cr.

From Chaucer to Shakespeare and beyond, the foundations of literature written in English were laid in the period covered by this survey. We will read classic works like The Canterbury Tales and King Lear . We will also explore the conventions of literary forms like epic that are essential for their understanding and appreciation, along with the historical, cultural, and literary contexts in which they were written. The course will emphasize the development of students' analytical reading and writing skills. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 218W Survey of British Literature II 3 cr.

This course will survey British literature in the major genres (novel, poetry, essay, drama, short story) from the Romantic period to the present. Students will examine literary texts within the context of established literary movements and trends as well as examine the ways in which literature addresses and wrestles with the issues that dominate its cultural and historical context issues such as British identity, class, race, gender, among others. The reading list will include an array of engaging texts, and class sessions will operate as energetic discussions of the readings. The course is also intended to enhance students' experience and skills of critical thinking, reading, and writing about literature. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 219W Survey American Literature I 3 cr.

A historical survey of American literature from the earliest times to the period that produced the first universally acknowledged American masterpieces. Here are the authors who defined the American character, including Washington Irving, Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and Frederick Douglass. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 220W Survey American Literature II 3 cr.

Representative selections from American authors treated in their literary and historical contexts; Civil War period to contemporary. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 221W Survey of Cinema 3 cr.

Introduction to the major genres and issues in the study of film. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 223W Survey of World Literature I 3 cr.

The Literature and Culture of the Ancient World and the Middles Ages.  A survey of the literature of the ancient world, Greek and Roman traditions, the Bible as literature, ancient literature of other cultures. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 224W Survey of World Literature II 3 cr.

From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment and the Late 19th Century (1400-1875).  A survey of the literature from the Renaissance to the 18th century Enlightenment and the latter part of the nineteenth century. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 225W Survey of World Literature III 3 cr.

Late 19th-, 20th- and 21st-Century Literature (1875-Present).  A survey of literature from the end of the 19th century to the present. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 300W Critical Issues in Literary Studies 3 cr.

Introduction to the major approaches to literary study and to substantive issues raised by literature and criticism. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 301W Special Studies: Creative Writing Workshop 3 cr.

Studies and practice in the various types of creative writing, emphasizing the creative process, critique, and revision. Courses in this area are typically organized around such topics as Poetry Writing Workshop I, Fiction Writing Workshop I, Playwriting I, Script Writing I. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 302W Special Studies: Critical/Professional Writing Workshop 3 cr.

Studies and practice in the various kinds of pragmatic writing, with an emphasis on style, purpose, audience, and clarity of expression. Courses in this area are typically organized around such topics as Expository Writing, Life Writing, Writing for Business and Industry, Professional and Technical Writing. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 304 Special Studies: Women and Literature 3 cr.

Studies of the various ways in which women have contributed to the development of literary expression. Individual courses may be organized around such topics as Women Writers and the Novel, Women in Literary History. Lecture.

ENGL 304W Special Studies: Women and Literature 3 cr.

Studies of the various ways in which women have contributed to the development of literary expression. Individual courses may be organized around such topics as Women Writers and the Novel, Women in Literary History. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 305 Special Studies: Popular Culture and Literature 3 cr.

Examination of various texts and topics related to popular culture and the popular imagination. Courses in this area are typically organized around such topics as American West, Text and Film; Science Fiction; Literature of Crime and Detection; Introduction to Film. Lecture.

ENGL 305W Special Studies: Popular Culture and Literature 3 cr.

Examination of various texts and topics related to popular culture and the popular imagination. Courses in this area are typically organized around such topics as American West, Text and Film; Science Fiction; Literature of Crime and Detection; Introduction to Film. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 306 Special Studies: Cultural Themes/Issues in Literature 3 cr.

Study of the literary treatment of various texts, topics, and issues from the perspective of cultural analysis. Courses in this area are typically organized around such topics as Western American Literature, Race and Literature, Gender and Literature. Lecture.

ENGL 306W Special Studies: Cultural Themes/Issues in Literature 3 cr.

Study of the literary treatment of various texts, topics, and issues from the perspective of cultural analysis. Courses in this area are typically organized around such topics as Western American Literature, Race and Literature, Gender and Literature. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 307 Special Studies: Religion/Spirituality in Literature 3 cr.

Study of the imaginative and critical treatment of religion and religious concerns in literature. Courses in this area are typically organized around such topics as The Bible as Literature, Ethnicity and Spirituality. Lecture.

ENGL 307W Special Studies: Religion/Spirituality in Literature 3 cr.

Study of the imaginative and critical treatment of religion and religious concerns in literature. Courses in this area are typically organized around such topics as The Bible as Literature, Ethnicity and Spirituality. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 308 Special Studies: Pittsburgh Filmmakers 3 cr.

Required production class for the English Department film studies concentrators. Students must register for this course with the Director of English Undergraduate Studies in the English Department. Lecture.

ENGL 309 Special Studies: Introduction to Film 3 cr.

Studies and practice of film, emphasizing form, theme and production. Lecture.

ENGL 309W Special Studies: Introduction to Film 3 cr.

Studies and practice of film, emphasizing form, theme and production. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 312W Composing and Analyzing Argument 3 cr.

This course will introduce students to strategies for analyzing arguments presented in a variety of textual modes and media and to practices for composing research-based arguments about such texts.  Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 313W Writing and Research in Digital Space 3 cr.

This course will examine digital spaces that combine research and writing environments and explore the consequences of this integration for how writers find and evaluate textual evidence and make and support claims. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 314W Textual Ethics in a Digital World 3 cr.

In this course we will discuss strategies for studying digital texts and technologies and their socio-political, educational, and economic consequences as well as for making socially just and ethical choices regarding whether and how to use these texts and technologies. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice, University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 316W Special Studies: Science and Literature 3 cr.

Course that focuses on the relationships between Science and Literature. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 377 Special Studies 3 cr.

Various courses meeting current interests of faculty and students. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

ENGL 378 Special Studies 3 cr.

Special topics in Literary Studies. Lecture.

ENGL 400W Special Studies: Creative Writing Workshop II 3 cr.

Workshops in a variety of creative writing modes. Courses in this area are typically organized around such topics as Playwriting II, Poetry Writing II, Fiction Writing II. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 401W Special Studies: Critical/Professional Writing Workshop II 3 cr.

Advanced study of various forms of professional, technical, expository, and business writing. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 403W Special Studies: Literature Across Boundaries 3 cr.

Varying topics reflecting the current interests of faculty and students, in courses that transcend the boundaries of a single culture, language, or discipline. Courses in this area are typically arranged around such topics as Modern Poetry and the Visual Arts; African American Literature and Music; The Renaissance in Drama, Poetry, and Painting; World Literature. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 404W Special Studies: Creative Writing Workshop III 3 cr.

Workshops in a variety of creative writing modes. Courses in this area are typically organized around such topics as Playwriting III, Poetry Writing III, Fiction Writing III. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 405W Special Studies: Medieval Survey 3 cr.

Courses in this area may include, but are not limited to, such interests as Survey of Medieval Literature. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 406W Special Studies: Medieval Genre 3 cr.

Courses in this area include, but are not limited to, such interests as Medieval Poetry, Medieval Drama, Medieval Romance. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 407W Special Studies: Medieval Authors 3 cr.

Courses in this area may include, but are not limited to, such interests as Chaucer, William Langland. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 408W Special Studies: Medieval Cultural Contexts 3 cr.

Courses in this area may include, but are not limited to, such interests as Arthurian Literature, Medieval Women Writers. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 410W Special Studies: Renaissance Genre 3 cr.

Courses in this area may include, but are not limited to, such interests as English Renaissance Drama, Metaphysical Poetry. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 411W Special Studies: Renaissance Authors 3 cr.

Courses in this area include, but are not limited to, such topics as Shakespeare, Milton. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 412W Special Studies: Renaissance Cultural Contexts 3 cr.

Courses in this area include, but are not limited to, such topics as Renaissance Literature and Politics. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 413W Special Studies: 18th Century British Survey 3 cr.

Courses in this area include, but are not limited to, such topics as Restoration Literature, 1660-1700; Eighteenth-Century Literature, 1700-1750; Eighteenth-Century Literature, 1750-1800. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 414W Special Studies: 18th Century British Genre 3 cr.

Courses in this area may include, but are not limited to, such topics as Eighteenth-Century Novel, Eighteenth-Century Poetry. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 416W Special Studies: 18th Century British Cultural Contexts 3 cr.

Courses in this area may include, but are not limited to, such topics as Eighteenth Century Women Writers. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 417W Special Studies: 19th Century British Survey 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as British Romanticism, Victorian Literature. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 418W Special Studies: 19th Century British Genre 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as Romantic Drama, The Victorian Novel, Victorian Non-Fiction Prose and Poetry. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 419W Special Studies: 19th Century British Authors 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as Wordsworth and Byron, Dickens. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 421W Special Studies: 20th Century British Survey 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as British Literature 1890-1945, British Literature 1945-present. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 422W Special Studies: 20th Century British Genre 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as Twentieth-Century Poetry, Contemporary Fiction, Experimental Writing. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 423W Special Studies: 20th Century British Authors 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as Joyce and Woolf, Yeats. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 424W Special Studies: 20th Century British Cultural Contexts 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as War and Literature, Poetry and Social Class. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 425W Special Studies: Pre 1900 American Survey 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as Colonial American Literature, American Literature of the National Period, American Romanticism, American Realism and Naturalism. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 426W Special Studies: Pre 1900 American Genre 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as The Slave Narrative, The Jeremiad. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 427W Special Studies: Pre 1900 American Authors 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as Hawthorne, Emerson and Thoreau. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 428W Special Studies: Pre 1900 American Cultural Contexts 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as Early American Women Writers, Nineteenth-Century Women Writers. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 429W Special Studies: 20th Century American Survey 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as American Literature 1900-1945, American Literature 1946-present. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 430W Special Studies: 20th Century American Genre 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as Contemporary American Fiction, Twentieth Century Poetry. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 431W Special Studies: 20th Century American Authors 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as Hemingway and Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 432W Special Studies: 20th Century American Cultural Contexts 3 cr.

Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as Southern Literature, The Harlem Renaissance. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 433 Special Studies: Language and Linguistics 3 cr.

Study of the history of linguistics, grammar, and theory and practice of linguistics. Courses in this area typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as History of the English Language, Introduction to Linguistics, Modern English Grammar, Advanced English Grammar. Lecture.

ENGL 434W Special Studies: Literary Criticism and Theory 3 cr.

Study of the history of criticism, contemporary theory, and the major ideas and authors working in the area of theory. Courses typically include, but are not limited to, such topics as History of Criticism: Plato to Shelley, Literary Theory since Arnold, Feminist Literary Theory. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 436W Theories of Persuasive Writing 3 cr.

This course will explore what different approaches to written persuasion mean for gathering and using evidence, constructing and presenting arguments, and developing theories of composition. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 437W Special Studies 3 cr.

Advanced study of writing. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 438W Special Studies: British Literature Across the Boundaries 3 cr.

Varying topics reflecting the current interests of faculty and students, in courses that transcend the boundaries of a single culture, language, or discipline. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 439W 19th Century Special Topics 3 cr.

Special topics in 19th Century Literature Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 440W Special Studies: Film Survey 3 cr.

Advance study of cultural, thematic, aesthetic, and production issues in film. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 441W Special Studies: Film Genre 3 cr.

Advance study of film genres and structures. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 442W Special Studies: Film Directors 3 cr.

Advance study of individual directors or a group of directors and their films. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 443W Special Studies: Cultural Contexts 3 cr.

Advance study of film from the perspective of issues of cultural and historical context. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 444W Special Studies: Film Theory 3 cr.

This class looks at the range of theories dealing with film and filmic representation. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 445 Directed Studies 1 TO 3 cr.

Offers the opportunity for students and faculty to conduct in-depth study of a topic not covered, or covered only briefly, in other departmental courses. Admission by permission only. Independent Study.

ENGL 446 Internship 1 TO 3 cr.

Provides a supervised observation/experience program of study in areas such as editing, technical writing, magazine and news writing, writing for business and industry, and theatrical performance and production. Admission by permission only. Internship.

ENGL 449W Special Studies: American Literature Across the Boundaries 3 cr.

Varying topics reflecting the current interests of faculty and students, in courses that transcend the boundaries of a single culture, language, or discipline. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 450W Special Studies: Senior Seminar 3 cr.

Required capstone class for all English Majors that asks students to conduct advanced literary study and research. Seminar. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 464W Special Studies: Creative Writing IV 3 cr.

Advanced workshops in a variety of creative writing modes. Courses in this area are typically organized around such topics as Playwriting IV, Poetry Writing IV, Fiction Writing IV. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENGL 470W Special Studies: International Study 3 cr.

Varying topics reflecting the current interests of faculty and students and includes international travel. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENTR 375 Entrepreneurship 3 cr.

An introductory course that provides an understanding of terminology and key concepts and requires students to create a business plan. The course utilizes entrepreneurs who have started businesses. This course is required for students prior to enrolling in other Entrepreneurship courses. Lecture.

ENTR 480 Financing/Valuing and Exiting Business 3 cr.

Students will learn techniques for valuing firms, estimating required financing, obtaining financing and designing and evaluating exit strategies. Emphasis is placed on both analysis and the communication of the results of this analysis to both technical and non-technical audiences. Lecture.

ENTR 481 Guerilla Marketing 3 cr.

The primary purpose of this course is to address the marketing challenges that small and medium-sized enterprises face with commercializing a product or service. It focuses on marketing fundamentals, market research, product development, market planning and sales execution. This course is intended for students who expect to utilize marketing techniques in an entrepreneurial environment. Lecture.

ENTR 482 Decision Making in High Velocity Entrepreneurial Environments 3 cr.

This course serves as a "decision lab" by situating students in simulated "entrepreneurial environments" and exposing them to a wide variety of problems faced by managers working in these environments. Provides students with effective decision making frameworks so as to equip them with the competencies necessary when and if they decide to either work for an entrepreneurial start-up, or create their own such organization, upon graduation. Lecture.

ENTR 494 Small Business Consulting 3 cr.

The Small Business Development Center (SBDC) is incorporated into the program. This course is the capstone experience for the Entrepreneurship concentration. Students have an opportunity to complete one of the following activities: write a business plan for an existing company, work on a project for a small business other than a business plan, or write their own business plan for a venture they would like to start. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. Practicum.

ENVI 116W Foundations of Energy and the Environment 3 cr.

The course provides students with an appreciation and understanding of the fundamental and theoretical background and concepts in environmental science. The impact of population growth on ecosystems, fossil and nuclear energy, resources and resource management, and population and risk assessment are among the topics to be discussed. The course will also deal with such issues as global warming, deforestation, biodiversity, and ozone depletion. This course provides a foundation for integrating other courses. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENVI 391 Environmental Science Experience in China 3 cr.

This course provides and in-depth three-week scientific and cultural experience in China facilitated through Duquesne University and the Chinese Association of Science and Technology. Students will travel to several universities in China and work in seminars or small groups with the opportunity to (1)communicate orally and in writing in topics such as environmental science pollution abatement: (2)acquire appropriate learning skills for collective laboratory work; (3)become familiar with global scientific issues through actively participating in scientific presentations. Students must participate in pre-trip seminars during the spring semester, in the August three-week trip including all activities during the trip, in the writing of reports to include in the trip summary document, and in a post-trip presentation to the public. Pass/Fail. Field Work.

ENVI 452 Environmental Chemistry 3 cr.

The course provides the fundamental background and theory of environmental chemistry. Topics include basic principles of aqueous interactions, phase interactions with water, soil and air, and applications of simultaneous equilibria in environmental settings. Methods of assessment and analysis including current EPA methods and topics important for environmental assessment. Prerequisites: C or better in CHEM 121, CHEM 122, and MATH 115. Lecture.

ENVI 466 Terrestrial Field Biology 3 cr.

This applied ecology course is designed to present an overview of field and laboratory methods used by ecologists to describe and analyze plant and animal aggregations and their environments. The course focus is on the principles and practice of various ecological procedures with explanation of how to collect, record and analyze data. The course reviews the basic concepts of ecology that are needed to understand the various methods and their significance. The course material is presented as a combination of lecture, laboratory and field sessions. C or better in prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L, BIOL 112/112L. Lecture/Lab.

ENVI 470W Environmental Toxicology 3 cr.

The course is designed to examine the toxic effects of air, water and soil pollutants on humans and the environment. Practical applications and environmental problems are presented, using specific pollutants, such as respiratory tract irritants, asphyxiants, pesticides, heavy metals, and organic solvents. Extrapolation of toxicological data from animals to humans is presented. The effects of environmental legislation and hazard evaluation of environmental toxicants are emphasized. Grading is based on exams. The three credit writing intensive section includes a research paper. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENVI 472 Environmental Biology 3 cr.

This three-credit course provides an overview of man's impact on other life on earth. Basic biological principles are examined in the context of man's interaction with the biosphere. Topics include: history of life on earth; population, community and ecosystems biology; human population growth; and the impacts of humans on biological systems, with special emphasis on effects of agriculture and on loss/protection of biodiversity. C or better in prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L, BIOL 112/112L, CHEM 121/121L, CHEM 122/122R. Lecture.

ENVI 491 Environmental Hydrogeology 2 cr.

The course is designed to study the movement and impacts of surface (streams, wetlands, lakes, estuaries, etc.) and groundwater (porosity, permeability, flow paths, Darcy's Law, etc.) and the relationships to environmental planning. Concepts dealing with water management, pollution, remediation and prevention will be covered. Use of topographic and geologic maps will be included as well as groundwater modeling computer programs. DEP & EPA guidelines, policies and laws are covered in conjunction with allowable contaminant concentrations (soil, water and vapor intrusion) and Statewide Health Cleanup Standards (used and non-use aquifers and site specific). Sampling procedures are covered along with the proper use of field equipment, chain of custody reporting, sample container and holding times. Real life case studies are covered along with field trips to give hands on experience. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L, BIOL 112/112L. Lecture.

ENVI 492W Stream Field Biology 3 cr.

Stream Field Biology is the study of the functional relationships and productivity of fresh water streams as they are affected by their physical, chemical and biotic environment. The dynamics of flowing streams, with their linear pattern, makes an ever-changing ecosystem dominated by constant erosion and deposition. Increasing knowledge about the operational stream ecosystem and factors that regulate productivity of the total watershed is crucial. The participants in this course will categorize stream order in a watershed; explain the abiotic and biotic relationships that exist with stream ecosystems; analyze the parameters of a watershed; and evaluate the trade-offs, costs and benefits of conserving stream watersheds. C or better in prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L, BIOL 112/112L. Lecture, Field Work. University Core Writing Intens.

ENVI 494 Environmental Sampling and Analyses 3 cr.

Explores the fundamentals of sample collection from experimental design and chain of custody to methods used for obtaining environmental samples from air, water, and sediment in addition to biological sampling. The class lectures are augmented with trips to field research stations and a river excursion with RiverQuest to obtain environmental samples. Sample analysis includes microscopy and spectrometry, as well as biological and molecular techniques. C or better in prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L, 112/112L; CHEM 121/121L, 122/122L; MATH 225 or permission of the instructor. Lecture/Lab.

ENVI 497W Applied and Environmental Microbiology 3 cr.

This course takes an in-depth look at microbial biogeochemical cycling and the application of microbial processes for biotechnology and bioremediation. Topics include biogeochemistry, natural attenuation, fermentation, and water treatment, in addition to current issues in environmental science. C or better in prerequisites: BIOL 212, 319, and CHEM 212 or permission of the instructor. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ENVI 499 Microbial Ecology 3 cr.

In this course, the interaction of microorganisms, primarily prokaryotes, with each other, plants, animals, fungi and the environment is explored. The course takes a systematic approach, examining these interactions at the ecosystem, organismal, subcellular, and historical level. Topics include: microbial primary production and photosynthesis, biogeochemical cycling, microbial community structure, modeling, symbiosis and microbial evolution. C or better in prerequisites: BIOL 212, 319, and CHEM 212 or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

ESL 118 Basic ESL Notetaking/Disc-A 0 cr.

Development of note-taking, presentation and discussion competencies at lower-basic level using content related to education, society and culture. Lecture.

ESL 119 Basic ESL Speak/Listening-A 0 cr.

Development of speaking and listening competencies at lower-basic level using communicative situations related to social and educational life. Lecture.

ESL 120 Basic ESL Grammar-A 0 cr.

Building foundation-level communicative competencies through contextualized practice with grammatical forms, meanings and functions. Lecture.

ESL 121 Basic ESL Speaking/Listen-B 0 cr.

Development of speaking and listening competencies at upper-basic level using communicative situations related to social and educational life. Lecture.

ESL 122 Basic ESL Reading-A 0 cr.

Development of reading and vocabulary expansion skills at lower-basic level using text analysis, supplements, discussion, and reporting activities. Lecture.

ESL 123 Basic ESL Writing-A 0 cr.

Development of sentence-level written English using grammar- and mechanics-based exercises and introductory process-related practice. Lecture.

ESL 124 Basic ESL Notetaking/Disc-B 0 cr.

Development of note-taking, presentation and discussion competencies at upper-basic level using content related to education, society and culture. Lecture.

ESL 125 Intermediate ESL Grammar 0 cr.

Development of intermediate communicative competencies through contextualized practice with grammatical forms, meanings, and functions. Lecture.

ESL 126 Intermediate ESL Speaking/Listening 0 cr.

Development of intermediate speaking/listening competencies using communicative situations related to social and educational life. Lecture.

ESL 127 Basic ESL Reading-B 0 cr.

Improving reading and vocabulary skills at upper-basic level using text analysis, authentic supplements, dictionary and reporting activities. Lecture.

ESL 128 Basic ESL Writing-B 0 cr.

Development of paragraph-level written English using process-related practice focused on introductory topic expansion, revision skills, and accuracy. Lecture.

ESL 129 Intermediate ESL Notetaking/Disc 0 cr.

Development of note-taking, presentation and discussion competencies at intermediate level with content related to education, society and culture. Lecture.

ESL 130 Advanced ESL Grammar-A 0 cr.

A rapid review of English grammar including advanced-level practice designed to strengthen oral and written proficiency. Lecture.

ESL 131 Advanced ESL Speaking/Listening 0 cr.

Development of advanced speaking and listening competencies using communicative situations related to social and educational life. Lecture.

ESL 132 Advanced ESL Reading -A 0 cr.

Development of advanced-level vocabulary, reading speed and comprehension skills and written reporting on extensive reading. Lecture.

ESL 133 Advanced ESL Writing 0 cr.

Development of advanced writing skills focusing on topic, thesis, supporting material, revision skills and appropriate source referencing. Lecture.

ESL 134 Advanced ESL Notetaking/Disc 0 cr.

Development of note-taking, presentation and discussion competencies at advanced level using content related to education, society and culture. Lecture.

ESL 135 ESL Special Topics 0 TO 3 cr.

An ESL course addressing specialized skill development. Lecture.

ESL 140 Intermediate ESL Reading 0 cr.

Development of intermediate-level vocabulary, reading speed and comprehension skills and written reporting on extensive reading. Lecture.

ESL 141 Intermediate ESL Writing 0 cr.

Development of intermediate-level writing skills focusing on topic, thesis, supporting material, revision skills and appropriate organization. Lecture.

ESL 142 Basic ESL Grammar-B 0 cr.

Development of upper-basic level communicative competencies through contextualized practice with grammatical forms, meanings and functions. Lecture.

ESL 143 ESL Graduate Research Paper 0 cr.

Development of advanced writing skills for graduate students featuring intensive work in research methods, bibliographic format, and editing. Lecture.

ESL 144 Advanced ESL Reading -B 0 cr.

Intensive practice in reading and analytical skills focused on differing literary genres at an advanced level. Lecture.

ESL 145 ESL Computer Skills 0 cr.

Development of computer skills including basic word processing and computer-based search resources for source materials. Lecture.

ESL 146 TOEFL Preparation 0 cr.

A rapid review of materials offering preparatory practice for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Lecture.

ESL 147 ESL Term Paper 0 cr.

A focus on expository writing, editing, revision and appropriate source documentation needed for UCOR 101. Lecture.

ESL 148 ESL Graduate Academic Discourse 0 cr.

A focus on integrated skills for advanced graduate students combining note-taking, reading, oral presentations, discussion and summary writing. Lecture.

ESL 149 ESL Intl Teach Assist Seminar 0 cr.

A focus on advanced oral and classroom presentation skills for graduate teaching assistants who are non-native speakers of English. Seminar.

ESL 150 ESL Guided Study 0 cr.

Discussions, readings and structured activities designed to facilitate cross-cultural adjustment to U.S. social and academic life. Lecture.

ESL 151 Advanced ESL Grammar-B 0 cr.

A review of advanced English grammar. Advanced level practice to strengthen written proficiency. Lecture.

ESL 200 Pronunciation for Professionals 0 cr.

Short-term evening class in pronunciation. Lecture.

ESL 201 Writing as a Professional 0 cr.

Short-term evening class in general and business writing. Lecture.

FINC 301 The Investment Environment 3 cr.

The Investment Environment provides important strategies for investing in a broad array of financial assets with a focus on common stocks, bonds and mutual funds. Topics include the structure and functioning of financial markets, trading mechanics, the measurement and presentation of performance, features of common stocks, bonds and mutual funds, financial market regulation and standards of professional conduct. Attention is given to legal, regulatory and accounting issues. Lecture.

FINC 310 Fixed Income 3 cr.

Fixed income (or credit) markets are highly competitive and constantly evolving, and the field of fixed income securities is complex and quantitatively demanding. It is rich with opportunity for those skilled in the conceptual framework used for pricing and hedging fixed income securities. The course is based on the CFA Candidate Body of Knowledge©. It provides an overview of the financial system, the concept of market efficiency and characteristics common to all financial assets. It presents the basic features of debt securities, embedded option provisions, relationships among bond prices, spot rates, forward rates and yields, and it introduces the fundamental notion of arbitrage pricing in the context of securities with fixed cash flows. It describes various ways to measure the risks of investing in fixed income securities and factors determining yield spreads. Additional coverage includes demand and supply analysis of bond yields, theories of the term structure of interest rates, asset securitization, and active and passive bond investment strategies Lecture.

FINC 330 Theory of Finance 3 cr.

Theory of Finance is a required course for both Finance and Investment Management majors. A particular emphasis is placed on the theory behind constructing optimal investment portfolios and the implications this theory has for asset pricing. A second theme of the course is to examine why market prices are thought to be fairly priced or "efficient" versus the opposing view (behavioral finance) that questions investor rationality and, therefore, efficient market prices. Theory of Finance also serves as the introductory course to the Duquesne University Investment Center in which students become proficient in using Bloomberg, Compustat, Morningstar/Ibbotson and other financial applications Lecture.

FINC 331 Business Finance 3 cr.

Business Finance is the introductory core course required for all undergraduate business majors. Students are introduced to the concept of shareholder wealth maximization through the following topics: financial statement analysis, time value of money, capital budgeting, cost of capital, risk and return, and impact of financial leverage on the value of the firm. Lecture.

FINC 333 Financial Management 3 cr.

Financial Management provides the second part (with Finance 330) of the necessary conceptual foundation for upper-level courses in Finance and Investment Management and is required for all students concentrating in Finance. Topics include: financial statement analysis and financial forecasting, risk and return, the cost of capital, capital budgeting, real options in capital budgeting, the corporate valuation model and measures of financial performance. Lecture.

FINC 334 Theory of Finance 3 cr.

Theory of Finance is a required course for both Finance and Investment Management majors. A particular emphasis is placed on the theory behind constructing optimal investment portfolios and the implications this theory has for asset pricing. A second theme of the course is to examine why market prices are thought to be fairly priced or "efficient" versus the opposing view (behavioral finance) that questions investor rationality and, therefore, efficient market prices. Theory of Finance also serves as the introductory course to the Duquesne University Investment Center in which students become proficient in using Bloomberg, Compustat, Morningstar/Ibbotson and other financial applications. Lecture.

FINC 336 Security Analysis 3 cr.

This course is an intensive study of the analytic techniques applicable to the selection of the various securities of private as well as public entities. Consideration is given to the markets in which these securities are traded and the type of information necessary to the decision-making process of the investor as the attempt is made to measure the value of a particular security. Several models are examined in seeking appropriateness in establishing the relative worth of a security. Lecture.

FINC 338 Futures and Options 3 cr.

This course is designed to develop an understanding of futures and options and other derivative financial instruments. The main emphasis is on the reduction of asset and liability risk for business and financial institutions through hedging operations in debt and equity instruments, commodities and currencies. Students will have an opportunity to study actual market behavior through project analysis. Lecture.

FINC 432 Credit Management 3 cr.

This course will focus on various analytical tools and techniques used to assess a potential borrower for extending both short and long term credit. Comprehensive financial statement analysis methods are stressed in the course. Students will augment their financial statement analysis with industry considerations, qualitative parameters and various loan structures for credit details. Portfolio considerations will also be evaluated. Lecture.

FINC 433W Financial Markets 3 cr.

This course is a comprehensive examination of the evolving nature of the domestic and international money and capital markets, as well as the underlying forces which shape them. Attention is also paid to the clearing, settlements, and payment systems, which play an important part in the markets' performance. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

FINC 437 International Financial Management 3 cr.

The course provides the conceptual tools necessary to understanding and making international financial decisions. Topics covered include: foreign exchange markets and exchange rate determination, parity conditions, types of foreign exchange risk and measurement and hedging techniques. Lecture.

FINC 450W Cases in Finance 3 cr.

Students draw on a wide range of concepts and tools from previous finance and accounting courses to address a series of realistic case-based problems in financial analysis. Emphasis is placed on identifying problems and developing persuasively argued and professionally presented solutions. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

FINC 451 Fund Management I 3 cr.

Fund Management I involves students in applied equity analysis and valuation. Students research companies for possible addition to the Red & Blue Partners portfolio, which is an open-end private investment management company that invests in common stocks of small-cap and mid-cap U.S. companies. Common stocks are selected on the basis of investment value and potential for growth as determined by the analysis and recommendations made by students in accordance with the Partnership's investment policies and guidelines. Students conduct in-depth research and analysis of individual companies in order to recommend stocks priced at substantial discounts to intrinsic value, where intrinsic value is evaluated using Free Cash Flow to the Firm valuation. Investment recommendations are supported by detailed research reports based on financial statements, annual reports, press releases, news and article searches, industry publications, transcripts of analyst conference calls, and other relevant information sources. Recommendations to buy, hold and sell are made to students, faculty and investment professionals in presentations and research reports. Fund Management I requires students to apply what they learned in previous classes to the complicated problem of Security Analysis and Valuation. Junior-level courses in Theory of Finance, Security Analysis and Intermediate Accounting provide the foundation knowledge. However, real skill in any endeavor comes only from sustained application - i.e., practice. Security analysis requires a deep understanding of a company, its industry and competition, and its financial statements. Much information on public companies is available free online, through Gumberg Library, and in the Investment Center. Students work hard to find and integrate as much of it as possible in their research. Lecture.

FINR 101 Design I 3 cr.

Design I is a foundation course that prepares students for more advanced work in art. It introduces the basic visual elements, principles of composition, and introductory design theory. Most of the work is two dimensional, and in black and white. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

FINR 103 Drawing 3 cr.

An introductory course that exposes students to a systematic study of formal elements, visual perception, and drawing techniques and media. Problems lead students from simple forms and concepts to more complicated ones, culminating in drawing the human form. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

FINR 105 Drawing for Scientists 3 cr.

The objective of this introductory course is to expose students to the formal elements of drawing skills with the goal of applying those skills to the challenges of artistically documenting and presenting science visually. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

FINR 120 Advanced Design 3 cr.

This course builds on the principles introduced in Design I, with additional work and study in three dimensional design and color theory. Students are encouraged to move away from preconceived notions about art, and to develop critical thinking skills in their discussion and analysis of compositions. An introduction to graphic art principles is included. Lecture.

FINR 130 Painting I 3 cr.

This is a foundation course that employs the acrylic medium. Students execute a series of projects that explore and develop design and compositional issues, color theory, expressive issues, and conceptual development. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

FINR 203 Figure Drawing 3 cr.

This course provides students with the opportunity for intensive study of the human figure through various drawing techniques. Lecture.

FINR 227 Art of Photography 3 cr.

In this introductory course, students will utilize their digital cameras to explore photography as a fine art medium, with vast potential for their own creative expression. Through a technical, formal and conceptual treatment of photography, students will gain a fundamental understanding of how to take a good photograph, how to see the world around them as if through the lens of a camera, and how personal expression has been explored in the history of photography. This  course in creative arts will provide students with an opportunity to develop integrative skills that include problem solving, critical analysis, and artistic expression. No prerequisites.  Digital Camera with minimum of 4 megapixels required. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

FINR 230 Advanced Painting 3 cr.

A further development of the skills and theory introduced in FINR 130. The acrylic medium is used. Lecture.

FINR 235 Computer Art I 3 cr.

Students will be engaged in expression through digital media and immersed in computer-mediated artistic activity. Through practice and application, computer tools will become effective vehicles for expressing conceptual ideas. The developing theory regarding computer generated art and design will be studied, and students will be encouraged to analyze their own content, decisions, and techniques. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

FINR 240 Typography 3 cr.

This course studies the history of the evolution and application of typography for the perception of meaning, intention and personality of the written word. Students will learn the nuanced application of design theory as it applies to typography, and the specific vocabulary and principles of typographic design. Projects include designing a new font, using typography appropriately in layouts, designing print items for marketing and commercial uses, and transitioning the knowledge of typography to the special requirements of web page design. Lecture.

FINR 245 Computer Graphic Design 3 cr.

Using graphics software such as Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop students will be exposed to current design aesthetics and historical design criteria. Work ranges from creative typography and free-hand drawing to digitally composed pieces, fusions of graphics and text, industrial graphic design, and advertising. Lecture.

FINR 315 Relief Printmaking 3 cr.

This course enables students to explore printmaking media such as woodcut and lino cut, as well as more recent relief technologies. Lecture.

FINR 320 Watercolor and Pastel 3 cr.

Both optical and conceptual compositions are developed in this course using the watercolor and pastel techniques. Lecture.

FINR 325 Advanced Photography 3 cr.

This course balances the activities of digital photography (camera use) with image editing and refinement within the digital darkroom, to achieve artistic ends. Studio efforts will include: the enhancement of technical skills relative both to photographic image capture and image manipulation, use of Digital SLR cameras, advanced image editing, the refinement of personal aesthetics and style, the exploration of conceptual approaches to art work, exposure to art historical and contemporary art, the analysis of work based on fundamental design principles and art historical and contemporary art references, and the production of portfolio quality work in digital and print formats. Lecture.

FINR 330 Oil Painting 3 cr.

Still life, figure painting, illustration and abstract problems are explored using the oil medium. Lecture.

FINR 335 Advanced Computer Art 3 cr.

The focus of this course is on conceptual projects and refining and applying skills acquired in FINAR 235. Work includes high resolution production and color printing, and the use of interactive media and video to create digital narrative pieces. Lecture.

FINR 350 Illustration Methods and Techniques 3 cr.

This course explores the integration of drawing, painting, design and concept, expressed in illustrative compositions. Students study the history, problems and processes of illustration and engage in a series of projects which introduce them to the variety of visual problems and possibilities in illustration practices. Lecture.

FINR 352 Narrative Illustration 3 cr.

Through the exploration of illustration techniques, students in this course explore how to conceptualize visually communicated stories for purposes such as book illustration, graphic novels, comic books, computer gaming and commerical art applications. Lecture.

FINR 360 Sculpture I 3 cr.

This course explores sculptural elements through various materials and techniques with the goal of increasing the student's spatial conceptual abilities. Lecture.

FINR 365 Advanced Sculpture 3 cr.

A continuation of the principles introduced in FINAR 360, using more permanent materials and more complex forms and projects. Lecture.

FINR 375 Computer Illustration 3 cr.

Computer technology and software are explored as aides to solving problems in illustration. Lecture.

FINR 400 Capstone Tutorial 1 cr.

Required of senior majors who declared after July 1, 2006. Working with their mentor in their final semester, majors will review their cumulative portfolio and evaluate their learning and achievements in the discipline. Other.

FINR 401 Advanced Computer Art 3 cr.

The focus of this course is on conceptual projects and refining and applying skills acquired in FINR 235. Work includes high-resolution production and color printing, as well as the use of interactive media and video, to create digital narrative pieces. Lecture.

FINR 405 Independent Study 1 TO 3 cr.

Permission of the Department required. Minimum of eighteen credits of Studio Art completed. Independent Study.

FINR 410 Studio Art Internship 1 TO 3 cr.

Permission of the Department required. Minimum of eighteen credits of Studio Art completed. Internship.

FINR 425 Advanced Photographic Imaging 3 cr.

FINR 435 Advanced Computer Graphics 3 cr.

FINR 440 Computer Animation 3 cr.

FINR 445 Introduction to Multimedia 3 cr.

Through the use of multimedia authoring software, students study and practice the integration of visual, audio and text sources that culminate in animated and interactive pieces. Both commercial and purely artistic problems will be explored. Lecture.

FINR 450 Illustrations Methods and Techniques 3 cr.

FINR 452 Narrative Illustration 3 cr.

FINR 466 Digital Professional Seminar 3 cr.

FINR 475 Special Topics-Computer Art 1 TO 3 cr.

Special topics in computer assisted design and imaging, such as animation, advanced multimedia and computer assisted illustration. Permission of Department required. Lecture.

FINR 480 Majors Studio 1 TO 3 cr.

FINR 485 Presentation and Portfolio 3 cr.

FORE 101 Introduction to Forensic Science and Criminal Law 2 cr.

The intersection of science and law provides us with new tools and methodologies for discovering truth. This introductory course, in part, is designed to provide you with a broad overview of the law that you will cover throughout the entire 5 year program. Concepts and doctrines in the areas of criminal and civil law, the roles of the expert, pertinent rules of evidence, and wrongful convictions will be covered. The importance of ethical considerations in forensic science and law is emphasized. Included is an introduction to the classical areas of the forensic sciences and how the sciences interrelate with the law. Lecture.

FORE 201 Philosophical Ethics of Law & Science 2 cr.

This course is designed to help students to integrate the scientific knowledge in forensic science studies into the social context of the making, enforcing and interpreting of the law. In so doing, the student will be introduced to some basic concepts of the law, and the ways in which the forensic scientist participates in the practices of the law. In addition, the course uses the formal disciplinary study of philosophy as an analytical tool for examining science, law and their intersections. Prerequisite: FORE 101. Lecture.

FORE 300 Professional Development I 0 TO 1 cr.

A multidimensional course that assists the Forensic Science and Law student with organizing curricular requirements, facilitating research options and scheduling timelines for accomplishing project completion in the last year of the Program. Presentations from invited speakers and Program Faculty broaden students' knowledge of research in the forensic sciences. The class meets periodically as a combined section with Professional Development II for the purpose of cross communication and discussions of common interest. Co-requisites: CHEM 371W. Lecture.

FORE 301W Wrongful Convictions 2 cr.

This upper level course will examine, from an interdisciplinary perspective, the principal problems that lead to the conviction of the innocent and the leading proposals for reform. Strong consideration will be given to the ethical imperatives of the police, prosecution, defense lawyers, and the scientific community. Approximately one-half of the class time throughout the semester will be used to cover these ethical considerations. Topics covered will include mistaken eyewitness identification; false confessions; junk forensic science; the role of forensic DNA testing; post-conviction remedies for innocence claims; the use of "jailhouse snitches" and cooperating witnesses; incompetent defense counsel; police and prosecutorial misconduct; ethical and moral problems posed by innocence and the death penalty; and the legal, practical, and ethical issues that arise for policy makers. Drawing on these topics, students will work in teams to study actual innocence/wrongful convictions in Pennsylvania and other jurisdictions. Prerequisite: FORE 101. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

FORE 391 Forensic Science Experience in China 3 cr.

This course provides an in-depth three week scientific and cultural experience in China facilitated through Duquesne University and the Chinese Association of Science and Technology. Students will travel to several universities in China and work in seminars or small groups with the opportunity to (1)communicate orally and in writing in topics such as forensic science and pollution abatement: (2)acquire appropriate learning skills for collective laboratory work; (3)become familiar with global scientific issues through actively participating in scientific presentations. Students must participate in pre-trip seminars during the spring semester, in the August three- week trip including all activities during the trip, in the writing of reports to include in the trip summary document, and in a post-trip presentation to the public. Pass/Fail. Lecture.

FORE 400 Professional Development II 0 TO 1 cr.

As a continuation of Professional Development I, this course continues to facilitate curricular requirement timelines for research projects, and enhancement of students' knowledge of research in the forensic sciences. Co-requisites: BIOL 530. Lecture.

FORE 401 American Legal History 1 cr.

This course is an introduction to the basic institutions and concepts of the American legal system. Attention is focused upon courts, their law making capacity and their relationship to other branches of government particularly the legislature. This course examines the fundamentals of our criminal and civil systems of justice. Prerequisite: FORE 101. Lecture.

FORE 402 Torts 1 cr.

This course exposes students to Torts using case law, statutes and other authorities, such as the Restatements of the American Law Institute. Students also are presented with a basic explanation of the American Legal System. The course is conducted primarily by lectures with some Socratic methodology where appropriate. A textbook and outside readings are used. Prerequisite: FORE 101. Lecture.

FORE 410 Forensic Investigation I 2 cr.

This course introduces the student to modern crime scene investigative techniques and will also explore the historical evolution of crime scene investigation. We shall study basic and advanced procedures employed by crime scene investigators with an emphasis on the detection, collection, and presentation of physical and testimonial evidence. The course identifies items commonly found at crime scenes and examines their significance in identifying and prosecuting people accused of committing crimes. Aspects of psychological and transient evidence associated with criminal activity will be explored including the difficulties of presenting non-tangible evidence to court and jury. Theories of information, observation, and interrogation as they relate to crime scene investigation will be examined, as will the ethics of current investigative procedures utilized by modern law enforcement agencies. Prerequisite: FORE 101. Lecture.

FORE 411 Forensic Investigation II 2 cr.

This course is a continuation of Forensic Investigation I with an emphasis on the study of the practical application of modern investigative techniques to a variety of criminal activities. Actual cases, accompanied by crime scene photographs will be presented, giving the student a factual view of techniques, procedures and strategies utilized by law enforcement officers conducting criminal investigations. We shall explore investigative relationships between local and federal law enforcement agencies and the potential resources each agency contributes to an investigation. Prerequisite: FORE 410. Lecture.

FORE 421 Environmental Law 1 cr.

This course will use lectures, readings, discussions and class presentations to introduce the students to the field of environmental law. The object is to familiarize the students with the legal background in which they may be called upon to practice their scientific training in the Forensic Science and Law Program, whether as consultants, regulatory or compliance specialists, or expert witnesses. Prerequisite: FORE 101. Lecture.

FORE 450 Internship 1 TO 6 cr.

The Forensic Science and Law Internship provides the student with a professional work experience in an organizational environment. The internship is an extension of the curriculum and provides meaningful experience related to the student's area of concentration. The internship responsibilities must be approved in advance by a program coordinator. The student is supervised within the work setting and also by a faculty sponsor from the Forensic Science and Law Program. Prerequisite: Student must have earned 60 credits. Internship.

FORE 460 Internship 1 TO 6 cr.

The Forensic Science and Law Internship provides the student with a professional work experience in an organizational environment. The internship is an extension of the curriculum and provides meaningful experience related to the student's area of concentration. The internship responsibilities must be approved in advance by a program coordinator. The student is supervised within the work setting and also by a faculty sponsor from the Forensic Science and Law Program. FORE 460 is Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: Student must have earned 60 credits. Internship.

FORE 470 Research Internship 1 TO 3 cr.

Opportunity for selected Forensic Science Students to work in either the Forensic Chemistry or Forensic DNA Laboratory on a research problem under the direction of a faculty mentor. In the forensic Chemistry Lab students work on several ongoing research projects, learning experiment development, problem solving and instrumental methods. In the Forensic DNA Laboratory students are responsible for sample processing, performing extractions on a variety of source material (bone, tissue, etc), quantification, PCR and genotyping, including database construction. Internship.

FORE 500 Internship 0 cr.

The Forensic Science and Law Internship provides the student with a professional work experience in an organizational environment. The internship is an extension of the curriculum and provides meaningful experience related to the student's area of concentration. The internship responsibilities must be approved in advance by a program coordinator. The student is supervised within the work setting and also by a faculty sponsor from the Forensic Science and Law Program. Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: Student must have earned 90 credits. Internship.

FORE 501 Trace Evidence and Environmental 3 cr.

The Trace Evidence course will provide the student with basic insight into background, theory, principles, scene investigation, sample collection, identification and classification of various types of trace evidence. Prerequisite: FORE courses, levels 100 through 400. Lecture.

FORE 510 Ethics in Forensic Science and Professional Responsibilities 1 cr.

Ethical conduct and professional responsibility of forensic scientists are critical for a proper functioning of the criminal justice system. The forensic scientist routinely faces challenges from the adversarial system. Investigators, prosecutors, and defense attorneys all want immediate results, clear results, and results that support their theories. Scientific culture should emphasize objectivity, scientific rigor, openness, and cautious interpretation of data. Also, the professional responsibilities of the lawyers legally extend to the forensic scientist as their agents. This course is designed to provide the student with the concepts to recognize moral, ethical, and professional issues and normative values for addressing these issues. Prerequisite: FORE 101, 201, 301W, 401, 402, 410. Lecture.

FORE 511 Forensic Drug Analysis 2 cr.

The Forensic Drug Analysis course is designed to provide the student with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to perform routine examinations and identification/classification of illicit drugs and chemicals. A thorough knowledge of the chemistry of selected classes of drugs is emphasized. Prerequisite: FORE courses, levels 100 through 400. Lecture.

FORE 513 Firearms and Toolmarks 2 cr.

The use of firearms comprises a large percentage of crimes in the United States. The course is designed to provide the student with the principles of firearms examination and firearms identification as well as other firearms related evidence. In addition, shoe print and tire print evidence will also be discussed. Prerequisite: FORE courses, levels 100 through 400. Lecture.

FORE 521 Forensic Serology and DNA Analysis 3 cr.

This course presents the theory and methodology used in the examination and identification of body fluid stains, including blood, semen and saliva. The determination of species origin and sources of false positive and negative results will also be covered. Students will cover techniques and methods of forensic DNA analysis, as well as statistical interpretation of results, report writing and quality control issues. Students will process mock forensic casework. Prerequisite: FORE courses, levels 100 through 400. Lecture.

FORE 522 Quality Assurance and Lab Administration Management 2 cr.

Forensic science is an applied science. The ability to consistently and reliably obtain results time after time and to demonstrate that this is done is important to courts and society. The human element introduces confounding factors that have to be managed as well. Ethical questions are emphasized throughout the course. This course is designed to provide you with tools to assure laboratory quality and manage the human and nonhuman laboratory resources in a forensic science laboratory context. Prerequisite: FORE 101. Lecture.

FORE 525 Forensic Toxicology 1 TO 3 cr.

This course will examine the global history of radical democracy from the French Revolution to Occupy Wall Street. It traces various global attempts to practice democracy outside of the liberal representative model. We will investigate such topics as democratic armies and factories, slave republics, pirate utopias, and even claims by some Germans that Nazi Germany "felt more democratic" than its predecessor the Weimar Republic. What sense are we to make of these exceptions to liberal representative democracy? We will ask what these radical ways of organizing and instituting society teach us and question why and how the liberal model has come to predominate our conception of democracy today. 3.000 Credit hours 3.000 Lecture hours Lecture.

FORE 535 Evidence and Case Management 1 cr.

The student is introduced to the process of receiving evidence, documenting chain of custody, and evidence security. Utilizing a LIMS for evidence tracking and case management will be covered. Stressed is the overall importance of the integrity of forensic evidence. Handling hazardous evidence is also covered. Prerequisite: FORE courses, levels 100 through 400. Lecture.

FORE 540 Constitutional Criminal Procedure 1 cr.

Criminal procedures for searches and seizures of evidence as constrained by the U.S. Constitution may affect the admissibility of forensic scientific analysis performed on the evidence in the laboratory. The forensic scientist should understand the constitutional dimensions of the law enforcement powers. In this course, significant U.S. Supreme Court cases will be read and discussed. This course is not an exhaustive or comprehensive study of the subject, but rather a survey of some of the major cases that affect everyday law enforcement. Prerequisite: FORE courses, levels 100 through 400. Lecture.

FORE 541 Latent Fingerprint Analysis 1 cr.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the science of fingerprints. Students will study the biological development of friction ridges, methods for developing, capturing, and preserving latent prints, and the ACE-V methodology for latent print comparison. This course will also provide students with the knowledge of current technology in the fingerprint community and the role of fingerprints in the field of forensic science. Prerequisite: FORE courses, levels 100 through 400. Lecture.

FORE 545 Explosives and Arson Investigation 2 cr.

The Explosive and Arson Investigation course will provide the student with basic insight into theory, principles, scene investigation, sample collection, identification and classification of explosive materials and ignitable liquids. Forensic Science applications for the analytical evaluation of Biological Warfare Agents (BWA) and Chemical Warfare Agents (CWA) will also be emphasized. Prerequisite: FORE courses, levels 100 through 400. Lecture.

FORE 550 Seminar Journal Club 1 cr.

The forensic science graduate experience includes presentations and discussions of topics of interest. One to two major formal PowerPoint presentations will be given based upon literature and laboratory research. Two to three informal presentations will be delivered based upon current journal readings or interesting cases. The presentations will largely be student-based, but may also include presentations of faculty and guests. Student presentations may be chosen or assigned. Prerequisite: FORE courses, levels 100 through 400. Seminar.

FORE 555 Expert Qualifications 1 cr.

The capstone course for the 5 year MFS&L program will prepare students for courtroom testimony and review the forensic science curriculum in preparation for professional certification tests. Prerequisite: FORE courses, levels 100 through 400. Lecture.

FORE 610 Trace Evidence Applications Lab 1 cr.

The purpose of this lab is to expand the student's knowledge of trace evidence analysis techniques. Students will practice collection and analysis techniques. Students will learn what is required for a positive identification, negative identification, and elimination. The student will also be instructed in proper evidence handling techniques and chain of custody preservation. Corequisite: FORE 501. Laboratory.

FORE 620 Serology, DNA Applications Lab 1 cr.

The purpose of this lab is to familiarize the students with techniques common to forensic serology. Students will learn the methods utilized in forensics laboratories for the collection and identification of physiological fluids while observing chain of custody and proper evidence handling. Corequisite: FORE 521. Laboratory.

FORE 630 Chemistry, Toxicology, Arson Applications Lab 1 cr.

An applications laboratory that covers analytical methodologies for detecting, identifying, characterizing, and quantitating chemicals, drugs, and poisons in forensic evidence. The examination of forensic evidence will include samples from arson and explosive investigations; biological samples from death cases; samples from illicit drug distribution; biological samples from illegal drug and alcohol use; and samples from suspected terrorism activity. Corequisites: FORE 525, 545. Laboratory.

FORE 640 Independent Research 1 cr.

Each student is required to write a paper and give a presentation on original research in the 5th year of the program. The independent research course is scheduled for the oral defense and evaluation of your original research manuscript. The work that the manuscript and defense are based on are a result of original research performed over the past few years. Research projects developed in the Advanced Forensic Chemistry Lab, DNA Methods/Population Genetics, and Forensic Investigations; or research projects in either Chemistry or Biology can be the basis for the paper and presentation. Each student must have a faculty advisor as well as a reader for their research; one of these individuals must be from the core forensic faculty. Lecture.

FORE 691 Forensic Science Experience in China 4 cr.

This course provides an in-depth three-week scientific and cultural experience in China facilitated through Duquesne University and the Chinese Association of Science and Technology. Students will travel to several universities in China and work in seminars or small groups with the opportunity to (1)communicate orally and in writing in topics such as forensic science and pollution abatement; (2)acquire appropriate learning skills for collective laboratory work; (3)become familiar with global scientific issues through actively participating in scientific presentations. Students must participate in pre- trip seminars during the spring semester, in the August three-week trip including all activities during the trip, in the writing of reports to include in the trip summary document, and in a post-trip presentation to the public. Field Work.

GMLI 316 Topics in Opera History 2 cr.

Conducted on location in Italy, this course offers a situated learning experience through which the history of Italian opera composers can come alive. The material of the course will be explored not only through readings, score study, and listening assignments, but also through activities that emphasize the cultural, geographical and social contexts in which the composers worked and lived. The course begins in Florence, where students will learn about the birth of opera as a genre, centering on the Florentine Camerata and visiting sites related to the work of its members (e.g. Palazzo Corsi and Accademia di Belle Arti). After the introductory experience in Florence, the course will follow one of three different trajectories, focusing on the life and work of either 1) Giaccomo Puccini 2) Giuseppe Verdi, or 3) the bel canto composers (Bellini, Donizetti, Rossini). Taking advantage of the Italian location, students will visit relevant museums, birth places of the composers, cities in which the composers worked, places in which their operas were set, music conservatories that prepared their performers, and the performance venues themselves. This experiential learning will be enhanced by the students' own study of the repertoire, synthesizing vocal technique with historical understanding. Students will prepare and perform selected arias from the composers' works, traveling to locations in which the operas might originally have been performed. In this way, students will not only learn about the musical works but will bring their knowledge and talent to the contemporary Italian community, experiencing the way that opera remains a part of Italian life today. Lecture.

GREK 103 Basic Greek I 4 cr.

The fundamentals of Greek grammar and syntax with exercises in translation. Lecture.

GREK 104 Basic Greek II 4 cr.

The fundamentals of Greek grammar and syntax with exercises in translation. Lecture.

GREK 203 Greek Reading I 3 cr.

Selections from major classical Greek author(s). Readings.

GREK 204 Introduction to Greek Readings II 3 cr.

Selections from major classical Greek author (s). Readings.

GREK 301 Pre Fifth Century (Variable) 3 cr.

The Iliad, the Odyssey, the Homeric Hymns, Hesiod, Pindar and Greek lyric poetry. Lecture.

GREK 302 Fifth Century (Variable) 3 cr.

Herodotus, Thucydides, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes. Lecture.

GREK 303 Fourth Century (Variable) 3 cr.

Greek orators, Plato, Aristotle, Xenophon and Menander. Lecture.

GREK 304 Alexandrian Period (Variable) 3 cr.

Apollonius Rhodius, Theocritus, Callimachus and the lesser Alexandrian authors. Lecture.

GREK 309 Studies in Genre (Variable) 3 cr.

Selected genre of Greek literature. Readings.

GREK 400 Independent Reading and Research-Greek 1 TO 3 cr.

Provides an opportunity to do independent reading and research under the supervision of a faculty member with approval of the Chairman. Independent Study.

HCSM 423 Basic Management & Business Concepts 2 cr.

This is a survey course designed to introduce the student to basic managerial and business concepts as a foundation for application to management of firms in the health care supply chain and their impact on the health care supply chain in general. Lecture.

HCSM 424 Drugs & Pharmaceutics Industry 3 cr.

This is a survey course is designed to introduce students to the basic structure and functioning of the pharmaceutical industry. The course seeks to give the student an understanding of the inner workings of each functional area in a typical pharmaceutical company; learn the interdependencies of each functional area and how they impact the strategic objectives of the firm; and understand the financial impact of each functional area. This course is a foundation to understanding a significant element of the American health care system and its role in the supply chain for health care. Lecture.

HCSM 425 American Health Care System 3 cr.

The course is designed to provide students with a foundation of practical knowledge about the American Health Care System.The course will provide an overview of the public health, economic, social, and political perspectives that define, describe, and shape the delivery of health care in the United States. The students will learn about the three primary elements of access, quality, and cost that confront policy makers, providers, and patients; and how these elements interact to determine the nature of health care systems and health policy. In addition, the course will incorporate basic concepts in epidemiology and health promotion related to the delivery of health care. Lecture.

HCSM 426 Clinical Medicine & Therapeutics 3 cr.

An introductory course to present an overview of common medical diagnoses including a discussion of current events. The course will include an overview of therapeutic modalities used to treat patients in clinical practice. Lecture material used will provide a basic understanding of specific pharmacological agents including over the counter and herbal medications. Topics will include pharmacological classifications, therapeutic indications, and a general discussion of adverse reactions, drug interactions and therapeutic contraindications. Lecture.

HCSM 427 Managerial/Professional Behavior 3 cr.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic elements of managerial and professional behavior. This course focuses on necessary theories, models, and skills for managers of the health care supply chain. In addition, the course relates these concepts to various career management issues. These objectives are accomplished through problem solving exercises, group discussion, role-play, and lecture Lecture.

HCSM 428 Basic Epidemiology 3 cr.

This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of public health, and the public health delivery system. It is intended to familiarize students with the basic principles and applications of epidemiological concepts in the study of disease occurrence in populations. Students will learn about the concept of public health, major community health problems and needs, and the importance of health promotion and disease prevention concepts, theories and services. Students will learn about the pharmacist's role as a public health professional and how we in many instances pharmacists are the most logical choice in the evaluation of outcomes of health promotion and disease prevention services. The roles and responsibilities of pharmacy within the health care system, and its interaction with other health occupations are discussed. Lecture.

HCSM 429 Health Information Systems Mangagment 3 cr.

This course provides an in-depth learning experience to health information systems management in an experiential, theory to practice method. Students analyze and learn about the components, issues, and policies that make data, information, information systems, and information technology a key part of healthcare. Students will learn how information systems are an enabler to quality healthcare. The focus is on the application of the material to practice. This dynamic course will immerse students in discussions, experiential exercises, interviews, and demonstrations. Lecture.

HIST 103W History of the U.S. I 3 cr.

The historical development of American institutions, ideals, and society from earliest times to 1877. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 104 History of the U.S. II 3 cr.

The historical development of American institution ideals, and society since 1877. Lecture.

HIST 104C History of the U.S. II 3 cr.

The historical development of American institution ideals, and society since 1877. Lecture.

HIST 113 Western Civilization I 3 cr.

An introduction survey of the origins and characteristics of European civilization, emphasizing the personalities, events, and institutions that have shaped the West through the 17th century. Lecture.

HIST 113C Western Civilization I 3 cr.

An introduction survey of the origins and characteristics of European civilization, emphasizing the personalities, events, and institutions that have shaped the West through the 17th century. Lecture.

HIST 114 Western Civilization II 3 cr.

An introductory survey of the origins and characteristics of European civilization, emphasizing the personalities, events, and institutions that have shaped the West from the 17th century. Lecture.

HIST 114C Western Civilization II 3 cr.

An introductory survey of the origins and characteristics of European civilization, emphasizing the personalities, events, and institutions that have shaped the West from the 17th century. Lecture.

HIST 151 Shaping of the Modern World 3 cr.

This survey of world history since 1900 examines major historical events around the globe and explores general themes such as tradition and modernity, war and peace, political revolutions and socio-economic change, the role of values and culture in historical development, and the complex relationship between the individual and society. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

HIST 151C Shaping of the Modern World 3 cr.

This survey of world history since 1900 examines major historical events around the globe and explores general themes such as tradition and modernity, war and peace, political revolutions and socio-economic change, the role of values and culture in historical development, and the complex relationship between the individual and society. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

HIST 161 Latin American Civilization 3 cr.

This course spans one thousand years of Latin American history, from 1000 AD to the present. It begins with the largest indigenous societies and then focuses on Spain's invasion of the western hemisphere and the resultant three centuries of Spanish colonial rule. Afterwards, the class examines Latin America's Wars of Independence in the 1820s and the significant changes that took place throughout the region in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The class revolves around political, socioeconomic, and cultural themes. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

HIST 162 East Asian Civilizations 3 cr.

This course surveys the development of East Asian civilization from ancient times to the modern age. Geographically it covers the countries of China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam. Subjects to be examined include religion and thought, political and socio-economic institutions, literary and artistic accomplishments, interactions with the West, and the transition from the traditional to the modern way of life. The course is intended to provide students with a general historical background and help them develop basic historical analytical skills so that they can better understand fundamental themes such as the relationship between diversity and unity in human life. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

HIST 165 Clash of Civilizations: Islam, the West, and the Modern World 3 cr.

This course introduces the history and significance of the cultural, social, and political contacts and conflicts between Middle Eastern and Western peoples. It addresses the controversial notion of "clash of civilizations" between the twentieth-century West and Islamic fundamentalism. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

HIST 167 Gandhi and the 20th Century 3 cr.

This course will explore the history and thought of Mahatma Gandhi during the movement for Indian independence, and examine the impact of his ideas on subsequent conflicts throughout the twentieth century, focusing in particular on the effort to secure justice in the face of political oppression, economic exploitation, racism and cultural bigotry, and environmental degradation. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

HIST 169 Reform and Revolution Since 1900 3 cr.

This course, which focuses on pre-existing conditions of social injustice and resulting fights for social justice, surveys numerous social and revolutionary movements that occurred in Asia, Africa, Europe, Latin America, and the United States from 1910 to the present. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

HIST 171C History of Christianity 3 cr.

This course traces the development of the Christian religion from its obscure origins to its present status as a diverse world religion with hundreds of millions of adherents. Our focus is on the ways in which the thought and organization of the Christian churches have responded to the enormously diverse societies and cultures in which they have existed. Lecture. Theme Area Faith and Reason.

HIST 172 American Religious Experience 3 cr.

This course explores the history of religion in American life from the colonial period to the present. We will focus on three themes: the ways in which religion has served to reinforce and challenge social and political structures, the relationship among the individual, the church, and the state, and the ways in which religious groups have responded to competition from secular ideas and structures. Lecture. Theme Area Faith and Reason.

HIST 174 Sacred Places: Faith, History, and Geography 3 cr.

Students will examine how sacred or holy places are identified with and reveal a culture's search for truth so as to gain insights into those cultures' unique worlds. As students study how the spiritual and physical coincide, they will also learn of shared themes among diverse cultures, such as how place grounds faith. Lecture. Theme Area Faith and Reason.

HIST 200 Global Geography 3 cr.

This course is a survey of the physical, political, economic, population, environmental and human geographic aspects of the world. The objectives are to provide students a general global perspective and for students to understand the interconnectedness that exists among all people and nations. Additionally, we will follow the Geography for Life: National Geography Standards 1994. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

HIST 201 U.S. History Survey 3 cr.

HIST 201 is the designation for the "College in High School" version of the US History Survey. Duquesne established this for Bishop Canevin High School's AP History course. The agreement with Canevin stated that if a student took the AP course and earned a 4 or 5, then like other students in AP, that student would earn 6 credits (3 for 203 and 3 for 204). BUT, if the student did not take the AP test or earned less than a 4 on it, then the student could come to Duquesne with 3 credits for HIST 204. In essence then, in the special circumstances noted above, HIST 201 could be described as a general American History survey with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. Lecture.

HIST 203 U.S. to 1877 3 cr.

This is a survey course that reviews the creation and development of American society, ideals, and institutions from colonial settlements to 1877. Lecture.

HIST 203C U.S. to 1877 3 cr.

This is a survey course that reviews the creation and development of American society, ideals, and institutions from colonial settlements to 1877. Lecture.

HIST 204 U.S. Since 1877 3 cr.

This course covers the historical development of American institutions, ideals, and society since 1877. Lecture.

HIST 210 Caput Mundi: Rome 3 cr.

HIST 211 Western Civilization Survey 3 cr.

HIST 213 Western Civilization I 3 cr.

This is an introductory survey of the origins and characteristics of "western" cultures and societies, meaning those from the Mediterranean and spreading up to the Baltic Sea. After a short introduction to the bronze and early iron ages, the course emphasizes the classical era when Greek and Roman cultures fanned out through the regions, through the Middle Ages, and finishes with the Early Modern period when new states, new religious sects, and developments in technology, learning, and trade transformed the medieval world. Lecture.

HIST 213W Western Civilization I 3 cr.

An introductory survey of the origins and characteristics of European Civilization, emphasizing the personalitites and events and institutions that have shaped the West. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 214 Western Civilization II 3 cr.

Western Civilization II is an introductory survey of the development of European societies in their global context since the 1600s. It presents persons, events, ideas and institutions that have shaped the "Western World" from the 17th through the 20th centuries. In studying the interrelated histories of southern, eastern, northern, and western Europe, students learn the foundations of modern western identities that developed within and in juxtaposition to a world increasingly globalized via trade, religion, colonization, war, and social movements. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

HIST 220 Boom$, Bust$ and Bailout$ 3 cr.

This course surveys the American economy from its roots in the competing visions for the new nation offered by Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson, through the stimulus the Civil War gave to industrialization, and on to the United States attaining the status of the world's most prosperous nation in the wake of World Wars I and II. The course covers the cycling of good and bad times in a capitalist economy; the challenges of wealth, poverty, and economic inequality throughout American history; the complex and often conflicted relationship of government and business; the struggles of American workers for economic security; and the transforming accomplishments of inventors and business innovators from Andrew Carnegie and George Westinghouse to Bill Gates. Lecture.

HIST 226 The American Home 3 cr.

This course selectively surveys domestic architecture in the United States from colonial times to the present. Students will study important aesthetic, social, cultural, and economic factors that have influenced the forms of housing in the United States. In addition to examining the history of both popular and innovative styles, students will look at interior design to discover how the layout and decoration of homes changed over time to reflect different needs and aspirations. The course will use the rich and diverse housing architecture of the Pittsburgh region as a field school for visits and study, and there will be hands-on practice in methods related to historical research and historic preservation. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

HIST 241 Roman History 3 cr.

An investigation of the Roman state from foundation to fall. Topics will include politics, the military, culture, religion, society, and economy. Readings will include a wide range of carefully selected ancient texts. Lecture.

HIST 242 Ancient Law 3 cr.

A survey including the contributions of the Greeks and of the Romans to the development of law. Lecture.

HIST 242W Ancient Law 3 cr.

A survey including the contributions of the Greeks and of the Romans to the development of law. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 243W Jews in Ancient Empires 3 cr.

An exploration of Jewish history in the imperial contexts of the Persian, Hellenistic, and Roman periods. In particular, we will consider the strategies Jews employed to explain and live under empire through critical study of the creative and diverse corpus of ancient Jewish literature. A key focus will be religion, but we will also discuss politics, society, economy, and the military. Topics will include: the Jews of Ptolemaic Egypt, the Maccabean Revolt, the Hasmonean dynasty, Herod the Great, the Alexandrian riots of 38 CE, Jewish sectarianism, the First Jewish Revolt, and the emergence of Christianity. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity, University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 244 History-Ancient Medicine 3 cr.

Examination of the most significant medical theories and practices in the period from the Egyptian temple physicians to the doctors of the Roman Empire. Special attention will be given to Hippocrates and Galen. Lecture.

HIST 245 Greek History 3 cr.

An examination of the development of Greek history and culture from earliest times up to the death of Alexander of Macedon. Lecture.

HIST 249 History-Egyptian Civilization 3 cr.

A survey of Egyptian history and culture from the pre-dynastic period to the establishment of Roman rule in Egypt. Special attention will be given to the artistic, literary, and religious achievements of Egypt. Lecture.

HIST 249W Egyptian Civilization 3 cr.

A survey of Egyptian history and culture from the  pre-dynastic period to the establishment of Roman rule in Egypt. Special attention will be given to the artistic, literary, and religious achievements of Egypt. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 250 Special Topics: History Abroad 3 cr.

This is a special topics, study-abroad course. It focuses on examining historical "book knowledge" in the context of touring relevant sites and meeting other peoples. Other.

HIST 251 African History 3 cr.

This course examines some of the various peoples of Africa over the past 500 years, but with an emphasis on the modern era. While the focus will be on cultures and cultural developments, economic conditions and political situations will also be studied. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

HIST 252 India, Pakistan and South Asia 3 cr.

This course examines the complex histories of South Asia, from Afghanistan in the west to Bangladesh in the east. The two largest countries, India and Pakistan, garner a great deal of attention, but the whole region is studied, with particular emphasis on the modern period. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

HIST 254 History of the Modern Middle East 3 cr.

A study of the modern Near East with concentration upon the conflict between imperialism and nationalism, traditionalism and western influences in the area. Lecture.

HIST 255 East Asian Civilizations 3 cr.

From the 17th century through the early 20th century Asian societies faced the challenge of European incursions into the region. This course will examine how the Asian peoples confronted the western challenge and the impact that this early globalization had on their politics, economics, and societies. Lecture.

HIST 256 Social History of China 3 cr.

This course examines the historical evolution of Chinese society and various aspects of social life in China. Subjects of study include philosophical and religious influences, major social institutions and customs, marriage and family, gender roles, education and employment, pastime and entertainment. Investigation will be conducted with particular attention to the relationships between tradition and modernity and between China and the West. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

HIST 257 Russia Before Communism 3 cr.

This course offers a broad survey of the rise of "Holy Russia" in the 9th century to the death of the "mad monk" Rasputin in 1916, but the focus is primarily on the rise and fall of imperial Russia from the 17th century to 1917. It examines the cultures and conflicts of the Tsars and serfs as it also looks at the wars to expand and secure the Russian state. Lecture.

HIST 258 Bolshevik and Soviet Russia, 1917-1991 3 cr.

Russia underwent dynamic political and social changes between the October Revolution in 1917 to the establishment of the Soviet Union in 1922, and from World War II through the Cold War to the Union's collapse between 1985-1991. This course will explore how and why such changes occurred. Lecture.

HIST 260 Central Europe 3 cr.

The medieval and modern history of the small nations situated between Russia and Germany on the east and west, and the Baltic and Mediterranean Seas on the north and the south. Lecture.

HIST 261 Modern Central Europe 3 cr.

This course covers the fascinating modern history of the land situated between Germany and Russia focusing on diverse ethnic groups, such as Poles, Croats, Slovaks, Serbs, Slovenes, Ukrainians, and Hungarians. The major themes include struggles for national independence, the impact of Soviet control after World War II, and the reassertion of national sovereignty after the end of the Cold War. Lecture.

HIST 263 Modern Italy & Europe, 1860 to Present 3 cr.

The course will focus on the following topics: national unification, WWI, the rise and fall of fascism, WWII, the end of monarchy and establishment of a republic, the European Economic Community, post-WWII political instability and corruption, the Cold War and Red Brigades, the European Union and Euro, and the Mafia. Italian history will be examined within the larger context of European and global history. Rome campus. Lecture.

HIST 265 England to 1715 3 cr.

This course recounts one of the great success stories of Western history: the rise of a remote island off the coast of Europe to the brink of global greatness. It will examine the development of her unique political system of parlimentary sovereignty, her economic and social strengths, her role in European politics, and her intellectual contributions to Western thought. The story is peopled with fascinating characters and England's institutions and ideas have had a fundamental impact on the United States. Lecture.

HIST 266 Modern Britain 3 cr.

This course will examine the factors and forces of Great Britain's internal development as well as its rise and subsequent relative decline as an imperial power in the world. It will study its unique political achievement of moving towards democracy without revolution. It will discuss the causes and course of its economic development. It will also describe the country's cultural contributions. Lecture.

HIST 270 Latin America: Conquest to Independence 3 cr.

A survey of Latin America from around 200 AD to the 1820s. The course begins with an in-depth look at the pre-Columbian Maya, Inca, and Aztec civilizations and their conquest by Spain. It then examines the socioeconomic, cultural, and political development of colonial Spanish and Portuguese society and the growing nationalistic tensions that led to the independence movement of the early 19th century. Lecture.

HIST 271 Modern Latin America 3 cr.

A survey of Latin American history since the 1820s that emphasizes the socioeconomic and political development of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Cuba, and Central America. Some of the themes emphasized will be Latin American economic underdevelopment, military rule, revolution, democratization, Liberation Theology, and the impact of these larger issues on the lives of ordinary people. Lecture.

HIST 277 History of Mexico 3 cr.

A survey of more than one thousand years of Mexican history beginning with the ancient Toltec, Mayan and Aztec civilizations and proceeding through the colonial period under Spanish rule. Emphasis is on Mexico since independence in the 1820s, especially political instability, the US-Mexican War, the Porfiriato, the 1910 Mexican Revolution, the PRI's seven decades of one-party rule, the transition to democracy, and NAFTA. Lecture.

HIST 291 History of Japan 3 cr.

This is a survey of Japanese history from antiquity to the present time. Examined are origins of the Japanese nation, the interplay between indigenous elements and outside influences in the making of Japanese culture and institutions, challenges of the modern age and Japanese reactions, militarism and imperialism, the "miracle" of post-war economic recovery and growth, as well as the ongoing dialogue between traditional and modernity in a rapidly changing world. Lecture.

HIST 292 History of Traditional China 3 cr.

This course surveys Chinese history from antiquity to mid-19th century. It traces the evolution of Chinese civilization, investigates major themes and aspects of this process, and examines traditional China in larger historical and cultural contexts to see how the Chinese experience, with its accomplishments and problems, relates to the modern age and outside world. Lecture.

HIST 293 History of Modern China 3 cr.

This is a survey of Chinese history from 1840 to the present. Issues examined include the fate of traditional China in modern times, China's relationship with the West, war and revolution, Mao and the communist movement, reform and economic expansion in the post-Mao era and their efforts on China and the modern world. Lecture.

HIST 301 Africans to African Americans 3 cr.

This course reviews the African origins of black Americans, the middle passage, the development of plantation slavery, and the many historical changes that shaped African-American life and culture thereafter—from the Revolution to the Civil War. Topics include the impact of the Revolution on African-American life; the gradual decline of slavery in the post-Revolutionary North and the development of a free black community there; antebellum slavery, slave culture, and slave resistance; the black abolitionist movement; and African-American freedom struggles during the Civil War and Reconstruction. Lecture.

HIST 302 African American History: Emancipation to Equality, 1865-present 3 cr.

"The course examines the transformations African Americans underwent during their journeys out of bondage towards first class citizenship. The course emphasizes Black Americans' creation of a unique culture of struggle and resistance as they sought to give "freedom" meaning. We begin with the emancipation and reconstruction experiences, and move to a sustained consideration of migration processes, the development of Jim Crow and the "Nadir"; and the emergence of protest movements and leaders throughout the twentieth century. Key issues include the changing status of African-American women, the emergence of black Americans in the professions, the dynamic dimensions of black popular culture, black protest movements and diverse black ideologies such as Afrocentricity and Nationalism, and an assessment of the current urban crisis. Lecture.

HIST 303 Violence in American Society 3 cr.

The course examines the historical significance of violence in America with an emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. It will examine the ways that violence has proven an indispensable part of American history, i.e. the ways that violence has become, in the words of Civil Rights activist H.Rap Brown, "just as American as cherry pie." The course considers political, economic, religious, psychological, and social factors that can help to explain the prevalence of violence in our nation's history. Lecture.

HIST 304 Spies, Assasins & the European State 3 cr.

In this course, students look at cultural attitudes toward spying, how and why spy networks developed, and what the early ones looked like. They will also learn about the use of assassins and spies as a tool of statecraft and diplomacy and the relationship of technology to the work of spies and assassins. Overall, the course is a study of 19th-century development of state bureaucracy. Lecture.

HIST 305 Rome: Emperors, Popes, and Saints 3 cr.

This course examines the history and culture of the city of Rome from the classical and imperial age to the sixteenth-century. Focus will be placed on the institutions and historical figures that have been prominent in the shaping of the city and its history. The course highlight will be a one-week, on-site learning tour of Rome during Spring Break. Lecture.

HIST 307 History of Science 3 cr.

This course will concentrate on the developments in science since the 17th century. It will examine the development of modern scientific thought and the impact that scientific discoveries have had on the modern world. Lecture.

HIST 309 The Scientific Revolution 3 cr.

Between the end of the fifteenth and the end of the seventeenth centuries the Western understanding of the natural world was transformed in ways that have probably done more than anything else to shape the world we live in today. This course will cover the well-known elements of that scientific revolution, including the discoveries of scientists like Galileo, Boyle, and Newton, and the philosophical theories of Bacon and Descartes. However, it will devote equal attention to the context of that transformation, including the social world of early modern science, developments in fields like natural history and alchemy, and political and econimic factors influencing scientific theory and practice. Students will gain an understanding of the intricate complexity of the developing scientific enterprise. Lecture.

HIST 311W Writing History 3 cr.

In this seminar course students sharpen the skills necessary to the practice of history. Students will work on increasing their proficiency in analyzing and interpreting both primary and secondary sources, developing their research skills, and improving their writing. Seminar. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 314 Introduction to Archaeology 3 cr.

An overview of the discipline of archaeology. We will consider the discipline's aims, history, theories, and methods, and will devote special attention to its modern practice, problems, ethical concerns, and significance. Also important will be the study of a wide range of archaeological sites throughout the world. Lecture.

HIST 315 Archaeological History-Ancient Greek World 3 cr.

A survey of the archaeology of Greece from pre-history to the Roman period. Lecture.

HIST 315W Archaeological History-Ancient Greek World 3 cr.

A survey of the archaeology of Greece from pre-history to the Roman period. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 316 Archaeological History of Athens 3 cr.

An investigation into the topography and monuments of Athens and Attica, from the pre-historic to the Roman period. Lecture.

HIST 316W Archaeological History of Athens 3 cr.

An investigation into the topography and monuments of Athens and Attica, from the pre-historic to the Roman period. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 317 Archaeological History: Ancient Roman World 3 cr.

A survey of the archaeology of Italy from pre-history to the middle fourth century A.D. Lecture.

HIST 317W Archaeological History: Ancient Roman World 3 cr.

A survey of the archaeology of Italy from pre-history to the middle fourth century A.D. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 318 Archaeological History of Rome 3 cr.

An investigation of the topography and monuments of Rome from pre-history through Constantine. Lecture.

HIST 318W Archaeological History of Rome 3 cr.

An investigation of the topography and monuments of Rome from pre-history through Constantine. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 319W Archaeological History: Seminar 3 cr.

Possible topics include the Bronze Age Aegean, the development of Vase paintings, the Etruscans, etc. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 320 Colonial America 3 cr.

This course explores the "New Worlds" of North America from the 1500s to 1763. Although there is an emphasis on the English colonies, it also examines the dynamic societies of and relationships between other Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans as they met new challenges on the continent. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

HIST 320W Colonial America 3 cr.

This course focuses on the exploration and settlement of British North America from the 16th century to 1763. It examines the dynamics of Native American, european, and African relationships as well as the development of colonial cultures, societies, and politics. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 321 American Revolution 3 cr.

Students examine what caused American colonists to war for independence from Great Britain and create a new nation. Besides examining social and military issues, this course surveys the political ideologies espoused by the revolutionaries from 1763 to the ratification of the Constitution in 1788 and the addition of the Bill of Rights in 1791. Lecture.

HIST 321W American Revolution 3 cr.

Students examine what caused American colonists to war for independence from Great Britain and create a new nation. Besides examining social and military issues, this course surveys the political ideologies espoused by the revolutionaries from 1763 to the ratification of the Constitution in 1788 and the addition of the Bill of Rights in 1791. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 325 Irish History 3 cr.

This course examines the history of Ireland from its beginnings to the present day. This is an upper division course, and as such, the student work will focus on historical writing and analysis. Lecture.

HIST 328 Early Republic:US,1789-1850 3 cr.

This course covers the numerous challenges that the new American nation faced when its survival seemed in doubt. As they struggled to establish the federal government, the founders also had to face the conflict between Great Britain and France that would eventually entangle the United States in its first major war. After the War of 1812, the nation turned inward to confront economic development, democratization, and the growing impact of slavery. Americans struggled with powerful waves of social change. As the nation expanded across the continent, political conflict grew, as party leaders like Jackson, Clay, Webster, and Calhoun sought compromise on the issues that would eventually lead to civil war. Lecture.

HIST 329 Pennsylvania and the American Nation 3 cr.

A history of Pennsylvania's societies and politics from the experience of its Native American peoples and European settlement, through its roles in the French and Indian War, American Revolution, and other national crises, to its rapid industrial development in the 19th century and its modern challenges of urban centers to the east and west and rural middle. Lecture.

HIST 329W Pennsylvania and the American Nation 3 cr.

A history of Pennsylvania's society and politics from the experience of its native American peoples and European settlement under the aegis of William Penn and its role in the French and Indian War and American Revolution to its rapid industrial development in the 19th century and its modern-day urban growth. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 331 American Immigration 3 cr.

The course examines the dynamics of immigration to the United States from the 19th to mid 20th centuries. Within the broader survey, the instructor may focus on the arrival of immigrants from Northern and Western Europe, those coming from Southern and Eastern Europe, and peoples from Asia and Latin America. Lecture.

HIST 333 American Women in History 3 cr.

This class traces the history of women's roles and women's lives from the time of the American Revolution to the present. In these years ideals of female behavior and the opportunities available to women have changed dramatically. Through lectures, readings, and discussions, students will consider the nature and cause of these changes. Lecture.

HIST 335 Crime and Criminality: Early Modern Europe 3 cr.

The period from 1450 to 1800 was a golden age of fraud, violence, and other crime in Europe--not to mention activities we no longer consider criminal, or even possible, like heresy and witchcraft. This course examines the rich and often bizarre records of this criminality, in court records and in fiction, in order to understand how early modern societies, and rulers' attempts to police them, functioned and failed. Lecture.

HIST 336 Catholic Church to 1800 3 cr.

This course will examine organization, practices, doctrines, and role in society of the Roman Catholic Church from the time it emerged into legality under the Emperor Constantine to its uneasy reconciliation with the Emperor Napolean a millenium and a half later. Questions investigated include: missionary endeavors; dissent and heresy; the changing nature of the papacy, espiscopacy, priesthood, and religious orders; church-state relations; gender roles; and theologians and universities. Lecture.

HIST 338 Christianity and Islam: Contending Cultures 3 cr.

For over a thousand years, these two great monotheistic religions, and the civilizations built upon them, have challenged each other throughout the globe. This course examines in particular the clash between Christianity and Islam in Europe and the Near East. Lecture.

HIST 340 History and Evolution of Western Law 3 cr.

Primary emphasis will be placed on the rise of customary law, from its roots in ancient times until the modern era. Lecture.

HIST 341 History of American Law 3 cr.

Law shapes the social order, and social order and society shapes the law. This course will discuss the legal principles that the first Americans brought from England and discover how the American experience has shaped the nation's legal system. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

HIST 342 War in the Pre-Modern Era 3 cr.

This course examines how and why warfare effected western societies. It will look at the traditional components of military history but will also examine the wider issues concerning the way warfare has influenced politics, social arrangements, economics, and technology. Lecture.

HIST 342W War in the Pre-Modern Era 3 cr.

A study and analysis of the phenomenon of war in the West from the Ancient World to the Enlightenment, with a special emphasis not only on how and why warfare affected society and brought about changes in politics but also on how soldiers lived their lives and did their duty. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 346 World War II 3 cr.

World War II was, simply put, "the largest single event in human history." This course will examine its causes, course and consequences. While the military aspects of the conflict will be discussed in detail, the human factors, political realities and social effects will also be covered. Lecture.

HIST 347 War in Modern Society 3 cr.

A study and analysis of the phenomenon of war in the Western World from the Age of Napoleon to the present, with special emphasis upon the interrelationship between international conflict and social, political, and technological change. Lecture.

HIST 351 U.S. Foreign Relations to WWI 3 cr.

An examination of the history of American foreign relations from the American Revolution to WWI. This is a study of the nation's exercise of sovereignty in foreign affairs, its rise to world power, and the internal and external conflicts that resulted. Lecture.

HIST 352 U.S. Foreign Relations Since 1917 3 cr.

The United States emerged as a major player on the world stage during and after WWI. This course will discuss the role that the country has played in international relations during the course of the 20th century and will also examine the domestic implications of the United States' rise to world dominance. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

HIST 358 Civil War and Reconstruction 3 cr.

An intensive study of the American experience from the roots of the sectional conflict in the expansion of the United States through the stuggle over slavery, the War itself, and the controversies over the restoration of the Union. Lecture.

HIST 358W Civil War and Reconstruction 3 cr.

An intensive study of the American experience from the roots of the sectional conflict in the expansion of the United States through the struggle over slavery, the War itself, and the controversies over the restoration of the Union. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 360 Constitutional History of the United States 3 cr.

An analysis of the Supreme Court and constitutional development, stressing the major controversies in the field. Lecture.

HIST 362 Civil Rights: Jim Crow to the Present 3 cr.

The Civil Rights movement stands out as one of the most significant social and political developments of the 20th-century American history. This movement, or rather collection of movements, ushered in major transformations in America life in law, in social relations, and in the role of government. This course will examine the modern implications of this movement, and other parallel or connected movements such as women's suffrage and rights as well as other ethnic and class struggles. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

HIST 364 History of Sexuality in US, 1820-2000 3 cr.

This course will explore the history of how people in the United States identified themselves sexually and engaged in sexual behavior from the early nineteenth century to the end of the twentieth century. We will focus on representations of sexuality in popular texts ranging from sensational fiction to sermons, from advice manuals to advertisements and twentieth-century sex-ed films. We will consider issues such as the emergence of a gay identity in the late nineteenth century, changes in reproductive technologies, sexual violence, prostitution, male and female body ideals, marriage, courtship and dating culture, and many other related topics. Lecture.

HIST 367 Radical Democracy 3 cr.

Possible subtitles for this course include "From the Jacobins to #OWS" or "From the Tuileries to Wall Street", for this course will examine the global history of radical democracy from the era of the French Revolution to the present (including the Occupy Wall Street movement). The course traces various attempts to practice democracy outside of the liberal representative model. We will investigate such topics as democratic armies and factories, slave republics, pirate utopias, and even claims by some Germans that Nazi Germany "felt more democratic" than its predecessor the Weimar Republic. What sense are we to make of these exceptions to liberal representative democracy? We will ask what these radical ways of organizing and instituting society teach us and question why and how the liberal model has come to predominate our conception of democracy today. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

HIST 368 French Revolution & Napoleonic Era 3 cr.

This course examines how the French Revolution and Napoleonic era changed that nation and its people socially, culturally, politically, and economically. It also reviews the revolutionary and Napoleonic wars and how they affected not only the French but other European nations and peoples: how they changed the way Europeans viewed themselves and others; how governments were organized and states constructed; and how diplomacy was conducted. Lecture.

HIST 370 Empire in Modern History 3 cr.

This course examines one of one of the most persistent and controversial aspects of modern history – the tendency of powerful nations to build empires and maintain them at almost any cost. "Empire and the Modern World" raises important historical questions about the exercise of power, the use of trade as an imperializing force, notions of race and cultural superiority, the creation of the "third world," decolonization, and the lingering effects of imperialism into the twenty-first century. While the most famous "old" empires of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries sprang from western Europe, this course also analyzes the "new" empires of Japan, the Soviet Union, and the United States, all of which became very powerful in the twentieth century. Lecture.

HIST 371 Western European Transformations, 1815-1990s 3 cr.

The course begins with the establishment of the German Confederation in 1815, moves through the formal unification of Germany in 1871, and on to the "Deutsche Einheit" (Germany Unity) of 1990. While Germany is a central focus, other Western European nations also figure prominently as the class focuses on such developments as the emergence of civil society, political radicalism, industrialism, urbanization, and imperialism. The course will also address the evolution of European diplomacy, the impact of national and mass politics, and the interplay between military and economic power. Lecture.

HIST 372 The Holocaust in Modern History 3 cr.

This course deals with one of the most significant and controversial events of the 20th century: the Nazi effort to totally annihilate Europe's Jews. That one of the most advanced nations embarked on the horrific policy of genocide gives the event a special place in modern history and raises a number of fundamental questions about the very nature of western civilization. Lecture.

HIST 374 The Vietnam Era 3 cr.

The purpose of this course is to create awareness among students of the significance of the Vietnam War in the recent history of the United States. Although the war is over thirty years old, its legacy has loomed over American foreign policy, American consciousness, and the American psyche since its happening. Lecture.

HIST 376 Revolution: Modern Latin America 3 cr.

The course begins with an analysis of different revolutionary theories, followed by an in-depth examination of the Mexican, Cuban, Chilean, and Nicaraguan revolutions of the 20th century. Unsuccessful guerilla movements in Guatemala and Colombia, as well as successful, peaceful social movements pertaining to women's rights also will be examined. Lecture.

HIST 378 Modern Africa: Independence and Issues 3 cr.

The history of independent Africa is a turbulent one, filled with wars, political upheavals, social disasters and unrest, economic calamities and a smattering of great successes. This course covers a variety of topics in the history of Africa from the independence movements of the post Second World War era to the present. Topics include, but are not limited to the following: the gaining of African independence, Africa during the Cold War, various military, political and social conflicts that plague modern Africa, the role of the United Nations and the African Union in creating political and economic stability in present-day Africa, the successes of various African nations at creating stable and economically viable states, and finally what the future holds for Africa. These topics will be examined through a variety of perspectives such as ethnicity, political, religious, economic and social factors. Lecture.

HIST 379 East Asia and U.S. 3 cr.

This course introduces students to the history of East Asia's interactions with the United States. Among subjects examined are the political, economic, and cultural contexts in which China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam encountered America; nationalist and imperialist struggles in the Far East and US involvement; the experience of American Christian missions in the region; Communist revolutions in East Asia and US policies; East Asia's economic "miracle" and its effects on the U.S.; and current challenges to peoples of the trans-Pacific community. Lecture.

HIST 381 East Asian History through Film 3 cr.

This course examines East Asia by utilizing both texts and feature films. It is a combination of general survey and topical study, covering major stages and themes in the development of Chinese and Japanese civilizations from ancient times through the modern era. Lecture.

HIST 382 Latin American History: Film 3 cr.

This course examines the last 500 years of Latin American history and uses feature films as its primary source. One-third of the semester will be devoted to the colonial period (1490s to 1820s), and the remaining two-thirds will focus on modern Latin America (1820s to present). The course and films emphasize Latin America's social and cultural evolution. Lecture.

HIST 385 America's Frontiers 3 cr.

The frontier played a significant role in the America's national creation myth, for it was the stage for and challenge to individuals seeking to fulfill their own and their nations' (the U.S. and others) destinies. The land and its peoples—Native Americans, pioneers, soldiers, ranchers, and other actors—have been depicted in epic dimensions in print, paint, and film. This course introduces students to the contacts and conflicts on the western frontiers, the processes and community and cultural development in the West, and how these have been manifested in the popular imagination. Lecture.

HIST 386 The American South 3 cr.

This course offers an examination of a distinctive region and culture that illuminates the contruction of American civilization. Lecture.

HIST 387 Native American History 3 cr.

This course focuses on Native American societies and the nature of their contact and conflicts with European settler societies and then the United States from the 1490s to the 1880s. The course also surveys general cultural continuities and changes with reference to selected Eastern Woodlands and Plains tribes and nations. Lecture.

HIST 388 U.S. Since 1945 3 cr.

A discussion of selected contemporary issues, foreign and domestic, which illustrate the identity crisis in the U.S. Lecture.

HIST 390 20th Century Political Leadership 3 cr.

The 20th century saw a remarkable number of great leaders, both the good and the evil, in all parts of the world. This course will examine such world altering figures as Hitler and Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill, Mao and Gandhi, all of whom left their mark on our world. Lecture.

HIST 391 U.S.: 1917-1945 3 cr.

This course studies the changes in American society from World War I to the end of World War II. Both domestic developments and foreign affairs will be covered. As the topic demands, events and circumstances outside the U.S. will be treated. Domestically, the social, political, and economic changes that occurred during these years will be discussed in detail. Lecture.

HIST 392 Germany: Kaiser to Hitler 3 cr.

The history of Germany from the collapse of the empire to the destruction of the Third Reich. Emphasizing political, social and economic aspects of the German Experience. Lecture.

HIST 393 Patterns in the Land: Environmental History 3 cr.

Woodie Guthrie wrote and recorded the song "This Land is Your Land" in 1956 celebrating the beauty and diversity of the American environment. This course traces the history of North America's environments, ecosystems, and societies by exploring the impact of the land upon its peoples and the impact of those peoples on the land. It covers a broad span of history from Indian mounds to American towns. Students will learn of settlement patterns, trade and transportation networks, and archaeological and ecological methods for understanding and preserving the land. They will also examine literary and artistic renderings, among other categories of experience and evidence, to understand the communities and cultures that developed upon and created American landscapes. Lecture.

HIST 394 Historical Geography 3 cr.

A survey of the physical world which is the basis for a human civilization, past, present, and future. What are the possibilities and limitations of different places for human development? How successful or unsuccessful were human settlements? Emphasis also on geography as an intellectual discipline and cultural phenomenon. Lecture.

HIST 395 Pittsburgh: Place, Peoples, and Urban America 3 cr.

The course moves from the conflicts over control of the forks of the Ohio and through the eras of farms and forts, furnaces and industry, to explore the creation and growth of the city of Pittsburgh and surrounding area. Pittsburgh was not only one of the original gateways to the West but a pioneer in industrial and urban America. This course will examine Pittsburgh's cultural as well as social, political, and economic developments. Lecture.

HIST 396 Public History: Peoples' Pasts 3 cr.

This course is about preserving, interpreting, and presenting history outside of academe. In looking at representations of the past beyond the classroom, students learn why and how peoples, in this case the American public, look at history the way that they do. Is public history supposed to be a matter of celebration, commemoration, or something else? While examining such issues, students will also survey various specializations across the field of Public History, including current museum, archival, archaeological, and historical preservation theories and practices. Students will also assist a community partner in a history project. Lecture.

HIST 399 Special Topics 3 cr.

A topical exploration offered by a regular or visiting instructor that is not normally covered in the department's listings. This designation may also be applied for one course transferred for credit from another institution if that course does not correspond to one of our offerings but does fit 300-level requirements. Lecture.

HIST 400 History Capstone 1 cr.

Working with their mentor, history majors in their final semester will review their portfolio and evaluate their learning and achievements in the discipline. Other.

HIST 401 Medieval Europe 3 cr.

An exploration of the elements which, taken together, comprise the unique culture of the Middle Ages. Lecture.

HIST 401W Medieval Europe 3 cr.

An exploration of the elements which, taken together, comprise the unique culture of the Middle Ages. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 413W Renaissance Europe: Courts and Nobles 3 cr.

This course will examine the life and culture of the early modern European aristocracy, particularly in the princely and royal courts of the period. From the Medici of Florence to Queen Elizabeth of England and Louis XIV of France, the courts of this era were scenes of opulence, great literature, and brutal conflict, and have fascinated historians for centuries. Topics will include the social foundations of the nobility; ideology and political thought; artistic and literary culture; sex and gender; and warfare, violence, and dueling. Seminar. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 415 Early Modern Europe 3 cr.

The transformative movements that molded Western civilization- the Renaissance and Reformation- will be subjects of this course. Particular attention will be paid to the changing understanding of human beings and their relationship to this world and their God. The social and political impact of these movements will be studied. Lecture.

HIST 415W Renaissance and Reformation 3 cr.

The transformative movements that molded Western civilization- the Renaissance and Reformation- will be subjects of this course. Particular attention will be paid to the changing understanding of human beings and their relationship to this world and their God. The social and political impact of these movements will be studied. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 417 Reason and Revolution 3 cr.

An examination of the history of Europe between 1648 and 1815, this course will concentrate on the rise of absolutism as personified by Louis XIV, the intellectual developments of the Enlightenment, the social and economic changes that underlay and undercut the ancient regime, and the great cataclysm of the French Revolution that ushered in the modern world. Lecture.

HIST 417W Reason and Revolution: Europe 3 cr.

An examination of the history of Europe between 1648 to 1815, this course will concentrate on the rise of absolutism as personified by Louis XIV, the intellectual developments of the Enlightenment, the social and economic changes that underlay and undercut the ancient regime, and the great cataclysm of the French Revolution that ushered in the modern world. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 419 19th Century Europe 3 cr.

An examination of the European experience between 1815 and 1914, with emphasis on political, social, and cultural trends. Lecture.

HIST 419W 19th Century Europe 3 cr.

An examination of the European experience between 1815 and 1914, with emphasis on political, social, and cultural trends. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 422 20th Century Europe 3 cr.

A study of the European experience between 1914 and the present, centering on such topics as the great wars, fascism, and contemporary trends in both eastern and western Europe. Lecture.

HIST 422W 20th Century Europe 3 cr.

A study of the European experience between 1914 and the present, centering on such topics as the great wars, fascism, and contemporary trends in both eastern and western Europe. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 428W British Empire 3 cr.

This course will examine some of the major political, social, economic and cultural aspects of the history of the British Empire since 1783. These include the abolition of slavery, the impact of industrialization on the empire, imperial wars, the expansion of empire into Africa, the world wars in an imperial context, and decolonization. Different historiographic themes will be analyzed in different semesters. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 429 Historic Preservation 3 cr.

This course is on the movements and organizations that developed to save, protect, and present historical sites. Lecture.

HIST 429W Historic Preservation 3 cr.

This course is on the movements and organizations that developed to save, protect, and present historical sites. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 430W The Atlantic World, 1450's-1750's 3 cr.

Instead of defining the Atlantic Ocean as a moat dividing East and West and even North and South, it should be seen as a great conduit of not just peoples, but of products, pests, pestilence, and ideas. Changes in Europe fostered exploration and colonization, which in turn promoted the development of empires, conflicts over trade and territories, and social and cultural innovations. This course examines some of the issues that connected and divided countries and peoples along the Atlantic rim in the Early Modern Era. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 433 American Women in History 3 cr.

This class focuses in on several key issues in the development of gender roles in North American from the colonial era through the present. While the bulk of the class will concern the evolving roles of women, we will also consider men's history and the history of sexuality. Lecture.

HIST 433W Gender in American History 3 cr.

This class focuses in on several key issues in the development of gender roles in North American from the colonial era through the present. While the bulk of the class will concern the evolving roles of women, we will also consider men's history and the history of sexuality. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 442W American Architecture 3 cr.

American architectural developments have been both dynamic and complex. This course provides students with a historical overview of North America's built environment form earthen houses to the concrete jungle. Lectures present noteworthy architectural styles, building types, and construction innovations from the pre-contact to modern eras, with attention also given to America's prominent architects and theorists. Students will learn what is distinctively "American" about the built environment. Students will assess what this continent's cities, landscapes, and buildings tell us about the American people. Students will gain tools for reading and understanding the architectural landscape as a way to "see" better America's pasts and present. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 443 American Decorative Arts 3 cr.

A survey of the decorative arts in the United States from the seventeenth to the mid-twentieth centuries. In addition to considering style and production techniques, this course will investigate the social and cultural context within which such works were created and displayed. Lecture.

HIST 443W American Decorative Arts 3 cr.

A survey of the decorative arts in the United States from the seventeenth to the mid-twentieth centuries. In addition to considering style and production techniques, this course will investigate the social and cultural context within which such works were created and displayed. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 445 Imperial Russia 3 cr.

An investigation of the political, social, and intellectual evolution of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th centuries. Lecture.

HIST 445W Imperial Russia 3 cr.

An investigation of the political, social, and intellectual evolution of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th centuries. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 446 Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union 3 cr.

A study of the political, social, and intellectual evolution of the Soviet Union since the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. Lecture.

HIST 446W 20th C Russia: Romanovs to Putin 3 cr.

This course examines the challenges to and overthrow of the Romanov rule, the rise and fall of the Soviet Union, and the creation of the new Russia since 1991. It explores political, social and cultural issues. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 448W World at War 3 cr.

This topical course examines one or both of the world wars of the early twentieth century. The instructor may choose to focus on just one of the conflicts in depth (for example, just World War I) or provide a comparative study of both. In either case, the course examines the diplomacy leading up to, through, and concluding the conflict(s). It also explores the cultural and social changes, technological innovations, and political revolutions that contributed to and were part of the European struggles that became global battles. Lecture.

HIST 450 The Cold War 3 cr.

An analysis of the diplomatic and political struggle between the United States and the Soviet Union in the aftermath of the Second World War and the ideological conflict between free enterprise and communism around the world. Lecture.

HIST 450W The Cold War 3 cr.

An analysis of the diplomatic and political struggle between the United States and the Soviet Union in the aftermath of the Second World War and the ideological conflict between free enterprise and communism around the world. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 452W Modern Germany 1871-1991 3 cr.

Since the 1870's, arguably, no other country has left more of an impression on the continent of Europe, if not the world, than Germany. The issues raised by Germany's rise to power, from colonial questions to the Treaty of Versailles, from fascism to the Holocaust, dominated world politics and war from the turn of the century through 1945. Efforts to ensure that human societies would not repeat German mistakes have had an equally profound impact; The European Union, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations, all owe their existence to the German legacy. This course will examine the history of Germany from its first unification (1871) to its second (1991). Our aim is twofold: First, to learn, in detail, the history of a people who lived through two Empires, three Republics, and three World Wars. Second, to unearth all the ways that German history has made us - i.e., how this history is concealed in the ways we think about ethics, politics, and culture today. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 460 New American Immigration 3 cr.

An examination of the dynamics of immigration to the United States with emphasis on the new immigration at the turn of the century. Lecture.

HIST 461W African American History: Multiple Voices 3 cr.

An examination of the experiences of Afican Americans in the U.S. beginning with Antebellum slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, turn of the century America, the Civil Rights movement and their continuing struggle to attain true equality in American society. This course will examine these topics primarily through the exploration of key political and autobiographical texts, including the works of David Walker, Frederick Douglas, Anna Julia Cooper, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Marcus Garvey, Maya Angelou, Malcom X, Issata Shakur, Elaine Brown, and others. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 465 Reform in America 3 cr.

From its founding to the present day, the U.S. has been noted for the strength of its reform movements. Whether they were striving to end drinking, prostitution, political corruption, or slavery, to achieve rights for women or minorities, to stop unpopular wars, or to usher in a Christian or socialist utopia, reform-minded Americans have banded together to try to achieve political and social change. In this course, we will consider the membership motives, rhetoric, tactics, and consequences of social movements. Lecture.

HIST 465W Reform in America 3 cr.

From its founding to the present day, the U.S. has been noted for the strength of its reform movements. Whether they were striving to end drinking, prostitution, political corruption, or slavery, to achieve rights for women or minorities, to stop unpopular wars, or to usher in a Christian or socialist utopia, reform-minded Americans have banded together to try to achieve political and social change. In this course, we will consider the membership motives, rhetoric, tactics, and consequences of social movements. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 470 American Urban - Historical Perspective 3 cr.

This course examines the development of the American city with special focus upon changes in land use patterns, social class arrangements, political organizations, mobility and migration, ecological patterns, industrial and commercial developments, transformation of the built environment, and the creation of a national urban policy. Lecture.

HIST 470W History of Urban America 3 cr.

This course examines the development of the American city with special focus upon changes in land use patterns, social class arrangements, political organizations, mobility and migration, ecological patterns, industrial and commercial developments, transformation of the built environment, and the creation of a national urban policy. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 472 Work and Enterprise: American History 3 cr.

An analysis of the forces which have shaped American industrialization, focusing on the impact of unionization and the development of big business on the everyday lives of Americans from pre-industrial craftsmen to industrial workers. Lecture.

HIST 472W Work and Enterprise: American History 3 cr.

An analysis of the forces which have shaped American industrialization, focusing on the impact of unionization and the development of big business on the everyday lives of Americans from pre-industrial craftsmen to industrial workers. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 473 American Intellectual and Cultural History 3 cr.

A survey of the major movements in thought and culture including religion, science, the arts, and philosophy, including moral, political, and economic thought. Lecture.

HIST 473W U.S. Intellectual and Cultural History 3 cr.

A survey of the major movements in thought and culture including religion, science, the arts, and philosophy, including moral, political, and economic thought. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 476W Individualism in American History 3 cr.

A study of American individualism as demonstrated in the writings of politicians, novelists, political theorists and others who have dealt with this important aspect of American culture. Lecture.

HIST 477 Nature and the American Experience 3 cr.

Is nature to be tamed or protected? How have Americans responded to the incredible and at first untamed natural bounty that greeted them? What impact have these natural surroundings had on the development of the American character? These are some of the issues dealt with in this course. Lecture.

HIST 477W Nature and the American Experience 3 cr.

Is nature to be tamed or protected? How have Americans responded to the incredible and at first untamed natural bounty that greeted them? What impact have these natural surroundings had on the development of the American character? These are some of the issues dealt with in this course. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 479 Diplomatic History of the United States 3 cr.

An examination of the various topics and interpretations of the history of American foreign relations of WWI. This is a study of the nation's rise to world power and the internal and external conflicts that resulted. Lecture.

HIST 479W History of Early United States Foreign Policy 3 cr.

An examination of the various topics and interpretations of the history of American foreign relations of WWI. This is a study of the nation's rise to world power and the internal and external conflicts that resulted. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 482 Inter-American Relations 3 cr.

An examination of U.S.-Latin American relations since the mid-19th century. Topics covered will include Manifest Destiny and the U.S.-Mexican War, the Spainish-Cuban-American War of 1898, the construction of the Panama Canal, U.S. economic and military penetration of the Caribbean and Central America, the Good Neighbor policy, the CIA-backed coup in Guatemala, the Bay of Pigs invasion, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the U.S. invasion of the Dominican Republic, the Contra War in Nicaragua, NAFTA, Latin American migration to the U.S., and Narco traffic. Lecture.

HIST 482W Inter-American Relations 3 cr.

An examination of U.S.-Latin American relations since the mid-19th century. Topics covered will include Manifest Destiny and the U.S.-Mexican War, the Spainish-Cuban-American War of 1898, the construction of the Panama Canal, U.S. economic and military penetration of the Caribbean and Central America, the Good Neighbor policy, the CIA-backed coup in Guatemala, the Bay of Pigs invasion, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the U.S. invasion of the Dominican Republic, the Contra War in Nicaragua, NAFTA, Latin American migration to the U.S., and Narco traffic. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 483W Mexico and the U.S. 3 cr.

This course focuses on U.S.-Mexican relations since the 19th century and covers the Texas rebellion and annexation, the U.S.-Mexican War, American economic penetration during the Porfiriato, U.S. military intervention in the Mexican Revolution, the expropriation of American-owned lands and oil companies in the 1930s, Mexican migration to and repatriation from the U.S., the Mexican foreign debt crisis, the narcotics trade, NAFTA, and the Mexican immigrant community in the United States. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 484 United States and China: 20th Century 3 cr.

Located on the opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean, East Asia and the United States historically played important roles in each other's life. This course examines the complex relationship between America and East Asian countries, covering the economic, cultural, political and military aspects of the interaction. Lecture.

HIST 484W East Asia and the United States in 20th Century 3 cr.

Located on the opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean, East Asia and the United States historically played important roles in each other's life. This course examines the complex relationship between America and East Asian countries, covering the economic, cultural, political and military aspects of the interaction. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 485 China in Revolution 3 cr.

This course investigates changes in China during the 20th century, with a focus on the Chinese communist movement. Topics examined include the meaning of revolution in the Chinese context; ideology, causes, events, and personalities of the Chinese revolution; consequences and impact of the revolutionary movement. Lecture.

HIST 485W China in Revolution 3 cr.

This course investigates changes in China during the 20th century, with a focus on the Chinese communist movement. Topics examined include the meaning of revolution in the Chinese context; ideology, causes, events, and personalities of the Chinese revolution; consequences and impact of the revolutionary movement. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 488W China and the West 3 cr.

This course explores China's encounters with the West from early times through the modern age, with an emphasis on cultural exchanges. It opens with a survey of Chinese history and Sino-Western interactions over time and then focuses on topics such as the Silk Road, the Chinese Empire and the Philosophies, Christianity in China, American influence and Chinese liberalism, Marxism and Chinese communist revolution, Chinese culture in the West and Western presence in China today. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 490 History Internship 1 TO 3 cr.

This is a special elective for a history major interested in and qualified to apprentice with a history organization (archive, museum, or historical society). The student has to meet both College (2.5 GPA) and departmental (at least 2.7 in a minimum of 5 history courses) requirements to take the internship. To earn 3 credits the student must have 120 contact hours with the history institution. Two credits require 80 contact hours, and 1 credit requires 50 contact hours. The student will also have a writing assignment. There is also the Liberal Arts internship, CLPRG 401, but it will not count for the major. For College procedures, see http://www.duq.edu/liberalarts/undergraduate/internships/index.html. Internship.

HIST 491 Senior Honors Seminar 3 cr.

Students pursue primary-source research on a topic of their choice under close faculty direction in a seminar format. Lecture.

HIST 491W Senior Honors Seminar 3 cr.

In this seminar, students review elements of historiography and writing and then pursue primary source research on a topic of their choice. They will write a lengthy research paper under close faculty direction. Seminar. University Core Writing Intens.

HIST 499 Directed Reading- Selected Historical Topics 3 cr.

With permission from the Department and close consultation with a faculty member, students can undertake an in-depth exploration of a topic of their choice that culminates in a lengthy primary-source research paper. Lecture.

HIST 499W Directed Reading-Selected Historical Topics 1 TO 3 cr.

With permission from the Department and close consultation with a faculty member, students can undertake an in-depth exploration of a topic of their choice that culminates in a lengthy primary-source research paper. Readings. University Core Writing Intens.

HLTM 305W Data Management 3 cr.

This course covers data management functions and operations. This writing intensive course requires essay examinations, case studies, and a group project based on a real world situation. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HLTM 315 Clinical Processes I 3 cr.

This course examines disease processes and their related procedures, tests, pharmacology and how information technology effectuates clinical processes. Lecture.

HLTM 316 Clinical Processes II 3 cr.

This course builds on the material learned in Clinical Processes I. It will focus on further review of systems and various related components such as laboratory and pathology. Lecture.

HLTM 320 Healthcare Delivery & Organization 3 cr.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the various organizations and technologies within them that comprise the healthcare delivery network. Lecture.

HLTM 333 Healthcare Reimbursement Systems 3 cr.

This course emphasizes both ICD-9 and CPT coding methodologies in addition to various reimbursement strategies. Lecture.

HLTM 340W Health Information Management Policy 3 cr.

As the healthcare industry continues to evolve, one must understand how research, information, information systems, data, and databases impact the policy process. This course has extensive writing and data analysis assignments. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HLTM 350 Introduction to Health Information Management 3 cr.

This course introduces the students to the health information management profession. Processes, roles, and the critical component that e-HIM and health information managers play across the continuum of care are discussed. Lecture.

HLTM 380 Introduction to Healthcare Management 3 cr.

This course will enable students to learn concepts and theories in health care management; develop the basic management skills and the ability to work productively with others; develop skills in using materials and references, tools and/or technology central to health care management, and to integrate health care management theory with real world problems through the use of case studies. Lecture.

HLTM 382 Introduction to Healthcare Finance 3 cr.

This course is designed to introduce students to the topics of finance and accounting which management encounters in health care systems.  The subject material will provide the student with the ability to understand the concepts and techniques of financial analysis and the decision making process in the health care environment.  The course will distinguish between financial management and accounting.  The emphasis will be on understanding and interpreting financial statements from a management perspective as opposed to the accounting aspect of generating/preparing the financial statements. Lecture.

HLTM 391 Long-Term Care Administration 3 cr.

This course will consider long-term service delivery programs designed to meet the needs of seniors and special populations. It will review care and service systems from a historical, philosophical and managerial perspective. The course will analyze the underpinnings of the profession, including the demographics of aging, the role of financing and the evolving marketplace. Lecture.

HLTM 395 Quality Performance and Improvement in Healthcare 3 cr.

This course will present an interdisciplinary perspective on quality management in healthcare taking into account a number of disciplines, including operations management, organizational behavior, and health services research. Students will become familiar with the underlying tools and approaches fundamental to continuous performance improvement. Lecture.

HLTM 400 Independent Study 1 TO 6 cr.

To meet a student's specific interest, an independent study can be completed if the topic is not covered in the general curriculum and the topic meets the HMS AHIMA accreditation standards. Please meet with the Department Chairperson. For majors only. Independent Study.

HLTM 425 Healthcare Human Resource Mgmt 3 cr.

This course focuses on healthcare human resource topics such as the use of information systems, the human resources process, and data driven decision making. Case studies will be a big component of this course. Lecture.

HLTM 453W Managed Care-Integrated Delivery Networks 3 cr.

This course examines the structures of managed care entities; the various perspectives, and managed care operations (capitation, information technology, legalities, and marketing). Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HLTM 455W Internship I 3 TO 6 cr.

This is a capstone experience of the program. Students obtain real world experience in clinical and technical settings. It is intended that this experience be suitable for inclusion in the student's resume or portfolio. Requirements will be discussed on an individual basis with the Faculty Project Director. Internship. University Core Writing Intens.

HLTM 456W Internship II 3 cr.

This is a capstone experience of the program. Students obtain real world experience in clinical and technical settings. It is intended that this experience be suitable for inclusion in a student's resume or portfolio. Requirements will be discussed on an individual basis with the Faculty Project Director. Internship. University Core Writing Intens.

HLTM 475 Medical Informatics 3 cr.

This course introduces the concept of medical informatics. Medical informatics is the intersection of information science, computer science, and health care. It deals with the resources, devices, and methods required to optimize the acquisition, storage, retrieval and use of information in health and biomedicine. Health informatics tools include not only computers but also critical guidelines, formal medical terminologies, and information and communication systems. It is applied to the areas of nursing clinical care, dentistry, pharmacy, public health and (bio) medical research. Lecture.

HLTM 477 Legal Issues in Healthcare 3 cr.

This course focuses on the laws and regulations of the health management systems industry and the technological impact of these on healthcare planning. This course requires in-depth reading. Lecture.

HLTM 485W Health Information Processes 3 cr.

This course examines in-depth healthcare processes, modeling, and engineering those processes using diagramming techniques. This course requires on-site visits. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HLTM 492 Quality Performance for Improvement in Healthcare 3 cr.

This course will present an interdisciplinary perspective on quality management in healthcare taking into account a number of disciplines, including operations management, organizational behavior, and health services research. Students will become familiar with the underlying tools and approaches fundamental to continuous performance improvement. Lecture.

HLTM 493 Risk Management 3 cr.

This course will address basic considerations of risk management within the healthcare industry such as legal concepts, development of risk management programs and effective governance. Risk financing is considered a distinct program component as well as ethics, patient communication, credentialing of providers, contract review concepts, employment liability, and patient and occupational safety. The course will also cover risk management strategies for specific high risk areas within healthcare organizations. Lecture.

HLTS 200 Disparities in Health Care 3 cr.

This course will provide a broad introduction into cultural themes of health, illness and health care by critically reviewing existing social inequalities and cultural perceptions. While basic biological explanations for health and disease will be considered in this course, the class materials and discussions will focus on the health consequences of socioeconomic status, race, religion and gender. Students will learn of past atrocities in medical experimentation (e.g. The Tuskegee Experiment) and relate them to modern research. Differences in the quality of healthcare delivered to racial/ethnic groups will be explored in an attempt to explain why health disparities exist in the United States. Students will also be challenged to consider how they may be eliminated. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

HLTS 290 Study Abroad-Health Sciences 3 cr.

This program gives students the opportunity to tour public and private hospitals, outpatient clinics, and public health facilities and interact with clinicians and health care personnel. During the trip, students will have opportunities to compare and contrast the European, Chinese and African healthcare systems to the US system and discuss how patient care can be impacted. There are no prerequisite courses. Information will be distributed to interested students during the Fall semester and a series of pre-departure class meetings will be held during the Spring semester. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

HLTS 315 Anatomy 5 cr.

This course is designed to provide Athletic Training and Occupational Therapy students with a relatively broad picture of human anatomy with a special emphasis on the musculoskeletal, peripheral nervous, and peripheral circulatory systems. There is also an introduction to the structure and content of the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic cavities. The course consists of both a lecture and a laboratory component. The laboratory component is required. During laboratory sessions, students will be directed in the dissection and study of human cadavers. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L, BIOL 207, BIOL 208 or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

HLTS 315L Anatomy Laboratory 0 cr.

This course is designed to provide Athletic Training and Occupational Therapy students with a relatively broad picture of human anatomy with a special emphasis on the musculoskeletal, peripheral nervous, and peripheral circulatory systems. There is also an introduction to the structure and content of the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic cavities. The course consists of both a lecture and a laboratory component. The laboratory component is required. During laboratory sessions, students will be directed in the dissection and study of human cadavers. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L, BIOL 207, BIOL 208 or permission of the instructor. Laboratory.

HLTS 320 Anatomy I 4 cr.

This course is designed to focus on the gross anatomy of various regions of the human body. The activities in this course employ a regional approach to the study of human gross anatomy. This course is designed to study the details of the anatomy in the regions of: the superficial aspect of the back; the deep region of the back; the vertebral column; the shoulder; the upper extremity; and the anterior and lateral regions of the neck. The course consists of both a lecture and a laboratory component. Lecture sessions present information pertaining to correct anatomical terminology; gross anatomy; and the organization and relationships of the various structures found in the above listed regions of the body. A dissection laboratory is a required component to the course. In the dissection laboratory the student, under the supervision of faculty, will dissect and study human cadavers. Efforts are made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in both lecture and laboratory sessions to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L and BIOL 112/112L or their equivalent; or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

HLTS 320L Anatomy I Laboratory 0 cr.

This course is the laboratory component of the HLTS 320 Anatomy I course. The activities in this course include dissection of human cadavers, the study of prosected human cadaveric material, the study of human skeletons and skeletal models, and the study of various organ models. This course employs a regional approach to the study of human gross anatomy. It is designed to study the details of the anatomy in the regions of: the superficial aspect of the back; the deep region of the back; the vertebral column; the shoulder; the upper extremity; and the anterior and lateral regions of the neck. In this dissection laboratory the student, under the supervision of faculty, will dissect and study human cadavers. Efforts are made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in the course to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L and BIOL 112/112L or their equivalent; enrollment in HLTS 320 Anatomy I, or permission of the instructor. Laboratory.

HLTS 321 Anatomy II 4 cr.

This course is designed to focus on the gross anatomy of various regions of the human body. The activities in this course employ a regional approach to the study of human gross anatomy. This course is designed to focus on the regional gross anatomy of the human: thoracic cavity and its contents; the heart; lungs; abdominal cavity and its contents; pelvic cavity and its contents; and the lower extremities. In addition to gross human anatomy this course covers selected topics in embryology. The course consists of both a lecture and a laboratory component. Lecture sessions present information pertaining to the organization and relationships of the various structures found in the above listed regions of the body and selected pertinent topics in embryology. A dissection laboratory is a required component to the course. In the dissection laboratory the student, under the supervision of faculty, will dissect and study human cadavers. Efforts are made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in both lecture and laboratory sessions to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Prerequisites: HLTS 315/315L, 320/320L, 470/470L, 570/570L or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

HLTS 321L Anatomy II Laboratory 0 cr.

This course is the laboratory component of the HLTS 321 Anatomy II course. The activities in this course include dissection of human cadavers, the study of prosected human cadaveric material, the study of human skeletons and skeletal models, and the study of various organ models. This course employs a regional approach to the study of human gross anatomy. It is designed to study the details of the anatomy in the regions of: thoracic cavity and its contents; the heart; lungs; abdominal cavity and its contents; pelvic cavity and its contents; and the lower extremities. In this dissection laboratory the student, under the supervision of faculty, will dissect and study human cadavers. Efforts are made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in the course to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Prerequisites: HLTS 315/315L, 320/320L, 470/470L, 570/570L; enrollment in HLTS 321 Anatomy II, or permission of the instructor. Laboratory.

HLTS 330 Physiology I 3 cr.

This course presents the normal functions of the human body. Molecular and physical mechanisms are highlighted at all levels of structural organization, from cells to organ systems. Topics in this first part of a two-course sequence range from the structure and function of cells and tissues, to homeostatic regulation by the major control systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L and 112/112L; CHEM 121/121L and 122/122L or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

HLTS 331 Physiology II 4 cr.

This course continues the presentation of normal functions of the human body. Pertinent examples of pharmacologic and pathophysiologic mechanisms are used to reinforce concepts of normal physiologic design. Topics in this second part of a two-course sequence include all of the major systems that perform coordinated and integrated functions. The goal for the student is to achieve a good understanding of total body function based upon the organization, functional mechanisms, and interactions of these systems. Prerequisites: HLTS 330, 480 or 580 and 315/315L, 320/320L or 470/470L. Lecture.

HLTS 335 Histology 1 cr.

This course is designed to focus on the basic cytology and histology of the human organism. The course will cover content relevant to cytology such as the cell membrane, cytoplasm and cytoplasmic structures. The course will also cover the ultrastructure of the four basic human tissues and the specific tissues of cartilage, bone, and skin. Efforts will be made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in the course to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Lecture.

HLTS 400 Independent Study 1 TO 4 cr.

With the guidance of a faculty member, a student may pursue an in-depth study of a subject area or develop an individual project in an area of interest related to their professional goals. Independent Study.

HLTS 401 Independent Study 1 TO 4 cr.

With the guidance of a faculty member, a student may pursue an in-depth study of a subject area or develop an individual project in an area of interest related to their professional goals. Independent Study.

HLTS 403 Neuroscience 4 cr.

This course introduces the major functional components of the adult central nervous system. Neuroscience begins with a functional overview of the nervous system from an embryological/anatomical perspective. This is followed by presentation of the major functional divisions of the nervous system. For each major division, normal function, cellular mechanisms relevant to normal function, and the functional consequences of damage to the system are presented. The course concludes with an introduction to the vasculature of the central nervous system. Prerequisites: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and SLP 250, or BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and HLTS 315/315L, or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

HLTS 420 Topics in Pharmacology 3 cr.

This course is designed to provide students of the allied health professions with a basic understanding of specific pharmacological agents including over the counter and herbal medications used in rehabilitation settings and specialized activity settings such as athletics. Topics include pharmacological classifications, mechanisms, therapeutic indications, adverse reactions, drug interactions, precautions and drug testing procedures. Prerequisites: CHEM 121 or 131, HLTS 315/315L or 515/515L. Lecture.

HLTS 425 Therapeutic Modalities 3 cr.

This course provides an introduction to therapeutic modalities used to treat patients in clinical practice. Lecture material will include a brief overview of the scientific foundation of how the modality operates as well as the physiological response that results. The indication, contraindications and evidence to support the use of the modalities will also be addressed and used in activities that exercise clinical decision-making skills. The laboratory portion of the class involves practical application of the lecture material. As in the lecture portion of the class, activities that exercise clinical decision-making skills will be performed. Prerequisite: PHYS 201/201L. Lecture.

HLTS 425L Therapeutic Modalities Laboratory 0 cr.

This course provides an introduction to therapeutic modalities used to treat patients in clinical practice. Lecture material will include a brief overview of the scientific foundation of how the modality operates as well as the physiological response that results. The indication, contraindications and evidence to support the use of the modalities will also be addressed and used in activities that exercise clinical decision-making skills. The laboratory portion of the class involves practical application of the lecture material. As in the lecture portion of the class, activities that exercise clinical decision-making skills will be performed. Prerequisite: PHYS 201/201L. Laboratory.

HLTS 430 Principles of Research 2 cr.

Introduces students to each phase of the research process. Discussions focus on the design, conduct, analysis and interpretation of clinical research studies. Lecture.

HLTS 430L Principles of Research Laboratory 0 cr.

In this laboratory, students read and critique current scientific literature, as well as present current findings that impact clinical practice. They also develop a comprehensive literature review and the framework for a research proposal. Laboratory.

HLTS 430W Principles of Research 3 cr.

To adequately prepare students to work in the ever-evolving health care arena, this course builds upon the basic statistical principles learned in MATH 225 and helps students to become intimately involved in the activities that support evidence-based practice and the development of research to address clinical questions in Athletic Training. As part of the course requirements, students will delve into scientific and professional practice literature to determine best practices and appropriate standards of care. Research design, analysis, and writing skills are emphasized in this class. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

HLTS 435 Histology 1 cr.

This course is designed to focus on the basic cytology and histology of the human organism. The course will cover content relevant to cytology such as the cell membrane, cytoplasm and cytoplasmic structures. The course will also cover the ultrastructure of the four basic human tissues and the specific tissues of cartilage, bone, and skin. Efforts will be made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in the course to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Lecture.

HLTS 437 Functional Kinesiology/Biomechanics 3 cr.

This lecture/laboratory course is designed to study the elements of normal human motion. Specifically, the course will focus on integrating the "Laws of Nature" which influence movement with anatomical concepts, and the concepts of osteokinematics and arthrokinematics of joints. There will also be an emphasis on how these "Laws" and concepts influence normal and pathological motion. The course will also examine the elements of typical locomotion and the gait deviations that result from the disruption of these elements. The course will consist of both lecture and laboratory components. During lecture sessions material pertaining to the specific osteology, myology, arthrology, arthrokinematics, and osteokinematics of specific joints will be presented to the participants for their consideration and discussion. Laboratory sessions will involve observations, palpations and discussions of both simple and complex human movements. With the guidance of the course faculty, the course participants will execute lab activities designed to integrate information and fundamental concepts pertinent to human movement. Prerequisites: HLTS 315/315L, 320/320L , 470/470L, 570/570L or permission of the instructors. Lecture.

HLTS 437L Functional Kinesiology/Biomechanics Laboratory 0 cr.

This lecture/laboratory course is designed to study the elements of normal human motion. Specifically, the course will focus on integrating the "Laws of Nature" which influence movement with anatomical concepts, and the concepts of osteokinematics and arthrokinematics of joints. There will also be an emphasis on how these "Laws" and concepts influence normal and pathological motion. The course will also examine the elements of typical locomotion and the gait deviations that result from the disruption of these elements. The course will consist of both lecture and laboratory components. During lecture sessions material pertaining to the specific osteology, myology, arthrology, arthrokinematics, and osteokinematics of specific joints will be presented to the participants for their consideration and discussion. Laboratory sessions will involve observations, palpations and discussions of both simple and complex human movements. With the guidance of the course faculty, the course participants will execute lab activities designed to integrate information and fundamental concepts pertinent to human movement. Prerequisites: HLTS 315/315L, 320/320L, 470/470L, 570/570L or permission of the instructors. Laboratory.

HLTS 441 Medical Sciences I 3 cr.

The Medical Sciences I & II courses are designed to provide an overview of the medical model of patient care as it applies to the various systems, diagnoses and conditions that patients may have. This course incorporates the science of pathology in conjunction with the technology of radiology and the medical laboratory to provide the student with a more complete understanding of disease processes which are manifested by patients as symptoms. The topics have been selected to allow physician assistant and physical therapy students to develop an awareness of the practice of medicine which will enable them to provide quality care to their patients in an effective manner. By applying appropriate diagnostic tools, students will learn how symptoms can be formulated into a working diagnosis. Lecture.

HLTS 442 Medical Sciences II 3 cr.

This course is a continuation of Medical Sciences I. Lecture.

HLTS 460 Sociocultural Systems and Networks 3 cr.

Therapeutic considerations in all aspects of multicultural diversity and implications for health care service delivery. Lecture.

HLTS 470 Anatomy I 4 cr.

This course is designed to focus on the gross anatomy of various regions of the human body. The activities in this course employ a regional approach to the study of human gross anatomy. This course is designed to study the details of the anatomy in the regions of: the superficial aspect of the back; the deep region of the back; the vertebral column; the shoulder; the upper extremity; and the anterior and lateral regions of the neck. The course consists of both a lecture and a laboratory component. Lecture sessions present information pertaining to correct anatomical terminology; gross anatomy; and the organization and relationships of the various structures found in the above listed regions of the body. A dissection laboratory is a required component to the course. In the dissection laboratory the student, under the supervision of faculty, will dissect and study human cadavers. Efforts are made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in both lecture and laboratory sessions to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L and BIOL 112/112L or their equivalent; or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

HLTS 470L Anatomy I Laboratory 0 cr.

This course is the laboratory component of the HLTS 470 Anatomy I course. The activities in this course include dissection of human cadavers, the study of prosected human cadaveric material, the study of human skeletons and skeletal models, and the study of various organ models. This course employs a regional approach to the study of human gross anatomy. It is designed to study the details of the anatomy in the regions of: the superficial aspect of the back; the deep region of the back; the vertebral column; the shoulder; the upper extremity; and the anterior and lateral regions of the neck. In this dissection laboratory the student, under the supervision of faculty, will dissect and study human cadavers. Efforts are made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in the course to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L and BIOL 112/112L or their equivalent; enrollment in HLTS 470 Anatomy I, or permission of the instructor. Laboratory.

HLTS 471 Anatomy II 4 cr.

This course is designed to focus on the gross anatomy of various regions of the human body. The activities in this course employ a regional approach to the study of human gross anatomy. This course is designed to focus on the regional gross anatomy of the human: thoracic cavity and its contents; the heart; lungs; abdominal cavity and its contents; pelvic cavity and its contents; and the lower extremities. In addition to gross human anatomy the course covers selected topics in embryology. The course consists of both a lecture and a laboratory component. Lecture sessions present information pertaining to the organization and relationships of the various structures found in the above listed regions of the body and selected pertinent topics in embryology. A dissection laboratory is a required component to the course. In the dissection laboratory the student, under the supervision of faculty, will dissect and study human cadavers. Efforts are made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in both lecture and laboratory sessions to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Prerequisites: HLTS 315/315L, 320/320L, 470/470L, 570/570L or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

HLTS 471L Anatomy II Laboratory 0 cr.

This course is the laboratory component of the HLTS 471 Anatomy II course. The activities in this course include dissection of human cadavers, the study of prosected human cadaveric material, the study of human skeletons and skeletal models, and the study of various organ models. This course employs a regional approach to the study of human gross anatomy. It is designed to study the details of the anatomy in the regions of: thoracic cavity and its contents; the heart; lungs; abdominal cavity and its contents; pelvic cavity and its contents; and the lower extremities. In this dissection laboratory the student, under the supervision of faculty, will dissect and study human cadavers. Efforts are made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in the course to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Prerequisites: HLTS 315/315L, 320/320L, 470/470L, 570/570L; enrollment in HLTS 471 Anatomy II, or permission of the instructor. Laboratory.

HLTS 480 Physiology I 3 cr.

This course presents the normal functions of the human body. Molecular and physical mechanisms are highlighted at all levels of structural organization, from cells to organ systems. Topics in this first part of a two-course sequence range from the structure and function of cells and tissues, to homeostatic regulation by the major control systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L and BIOL 112/112L; CHEM 121 and 122 or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

HLTS 481 Physiology II 4 cr.

This course continues the presentation of normal functions of the human body. Pertinent examples of pharmacologic and pathophysiologic mechanisms are used to reinforce concepts of normal physiologic design. Topics in this second part of a two-course sequence include all of the major systems that perform coordinated and integrated functions. The goal for the student is to achieve a good understanding of total body function based upon the organization, functional mechanisms, and interactions of these systems. Prerequisites: HLTS 330, 480 or 580 and 315/315L, 320/320L, or 470/470L or 570/570L. Lecture.

HLTS 500 Independent Study 1 TO 6 cr.

With the guidance of a faculty member, a student may pursue an in-depth study of a subject area or develop an individual project in an area of interest related to their professional goals. Independent Study.

HLTS 503 Neuroscience 4 cr.

This course introduces the major functional components of the adult central nervous system. Neuroscience begins with a functional overview of the nervous system from an embryological/anatomical perspective. This is followed by presentation of the major functional divisions of the nervous system. For each major division, normal function, cellular mechanisms relevant to normal function, and the functional consequences of damage to the system are presented. The course concludes with an introduction to the vasculature of the central nervous system. Prerequisites: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and SLP 250, or BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and HLTS 315, HLTS 315L, or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

HLTS 515 Anatomy 5 cr.

This course is designed to provide Athletic Training and Occupational Therapy students with a relatively broad picture of human anatomy with a special emphasis on the musculoskeletal, peripheral nervous, and peripheral circulatory systems. There is also an introduction to the structure and content of the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic cavities. The course consists of both a lecture and a laboratory component. The laboratory component is required. During laboratory sessions, students will be directed in the dissection and study of human cadavers. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L, BIOL 207, BIOL 208 or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

HLTS 515L Anatomy Lab 0 cr.

This course is designed to provide Athletic Training and Occupational Therapy students with a relatively broad picture of human anatomy with a special emphasis on the musculoskeletal, peripheral nervous, and peripheral circulatory systems. There is also an introduction to the structure and content of the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic cavities. The course consists of both a lecture and a laboratory component. The laboratory component is required. During laboratory sessions, students will be directed in the dissection and study of human cadavers. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L, BIOL 207, BIOL 208 or permission of the instructor. Laboratory.

HLTS 520 Topics in Pharmacology 3 cr.

This course is designed to provide students of the allied health professions with a basic understanding of specific pharmacological agents including over the counter and herbal medications used in rehabilitation settings and specialized activity settings such as athletics. Topics include pharmacological classifications, mechanisms, therapeutic indications, adverse reactions, drug interactions, precautions and drug testing procedures. Prerequisites: CHEM 121 or 131, HLTS 315/315L or 515/515L. Lecture.

HLTS 525 Therapeutic Modalities 3 cr.

This course provides an introduction to therapeutic modalities used to treat patients in clinical practice. Lecture material will include a brief overview of the scientific foundation of how the modality operates as well as the physiological response that results. The indication, contraindications and evidence to support the use of the modalities will also be addressed and used in activities that exercise clinical decision-making skills. The laboratory portion of the class involves practical application of the lecture material. As in the lecture portion of the class, activities that exercise clinical decision-making skills will be performed. Prerequisite: PHYS 201/201L. Lecture.

HLTS 525L Therapeutic Modalities Lab 0 cr.

This course provides an introduction to therapeutic modalities used to treat patients in clinical practice. Lecture material will include a brief overview of the scientific foundation of how the modality operates as well as the physiological response that results. The indication, contraindications and evidence to support the use of the modalities will also be addressed and used in activities that exercise clinical decision-making skills. The laboratory portion of the class involves practical application of the lecture material. As in the lecture portion of the class, activities that exercise clinical decision-making skills will be performed. Prerequisite: PHYS 201/201L. Laboratory.

HLTS 530 Principles of Research 2 cr.

Introduces students to each phase of the research process. Discussions focus on the design, conduct, analysis and interpretation of clinical research studies. Lecture.

HLTS 531L Research Seminar Lab 1 cr.

This laboratory course complements the Principles of Research course which provides the didactic information regarding quantitative approaches to research. The primary goal of this laboratory is to apply this didactic information though a guided research project. The project will provide practical experience in the implementation of a research project from idea generation through research reporting. Lecture.

HLTS 535 Histology 1 cr.

This course is designed to focus on the basic cytology and histology of the human organism. The course will cover content relevant to cytology such as the cell membrane, cytoplasm and cytoplasmic structures. The course will also cover the ultrastructure of the four basic human tissues and the specific tissues of cartilage, bone, and skin. Efforts will be made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in the course to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Lecture.

HLTS 537 Functional Kinesiology/Biomechanics 3 cr.

This lecture/laboratory course is designed to study the elements of normal human motion. Specifically, the course will focus on integrating the "Laws of Nature" which influence movement with anatomical concepts, and the concepts of osteokinematics and arthrokinematics of joints. There will also be an emphasis on how these "Laws" and concepts influence normal and pathological motion. The course will also examine the elements of typical locomotion and the gait deviations that result from the disruption of these elements. The course will consist of both lecture and laboratory components. During lecture sessions material pertaining to the specific osteology, myology, arthrology, arthrokinematics, and osteokinematics of specific joints will be presented to the participants for their consideration and discussion. Laboratory sessions will involve observations, palpations and discussions of both simple and complex human movements. With the guidance of the course faculty, the course participants will execute lab activities designed to integrate information and fundamental concepts pertinent to human movement. Prerequisites: HLTS 315/315L, 320/320L, 470/470L, 570/570L or permission of the instructors. Lecture.

HLTS 537L Functional Kinesiology/Biomechanics Lab 0 cr.

This lecture/laboratory course is designed to study the elements of normal human motion. Specifically, the course will focus on integrating the "Laws of Nature" which influence movement with anatomical concepts, and the concepts of osteokinematics and arthrokinematics of joints. There will also be an emphasis on how these "Laws" and concepts influence normal and pathological motion. The course will also examine the elements of typical locomotion and the gait deviations that result from the disruption of these elements. The course will consist of both lecture and laboratory components. During lecture sessions material pertaining to the specific osteology, myology, arthrology, arthrokinematics, and osteokinematics of specific joints will be presented to the participants for their consideration and discussion. Laboratory sessions will involve observations, palpations and discussions of both simple and complex human movements. With the guidance of the course faculty, the course participants will execute lab activities designed to integrate information and fundamental concepts pertinent to human movement. Prerequisites: HLTS 315/315L, 320/320L, 470/470L, 570/570L or permission of the instructors. Laboratory.

HLTS 551 Medical Sciences I 3 cr.

The Medical Sciences I & II courses are designed to provide an overview of the medical model of patient care as it applies to the various systems, diagnoses and conditions that patients may have. This course incorporates the science of pathology in conjunction with the technology of radiology and the medical laboratory to provide the student with a more complete understanding of disease processes which are manifested by patients as symptoms. The topics have been selected to allow physician assistant and physical therapy students to develop an awareness of the practice of medicine which will enable them to provide quality care to their patients in an effective manner. By applying appropriate diagnostic tools, students will learn how symptoms can be formulated into a working diagnosis. Lecture.

HLTS 552 Medical Sciences II 3 cr.

This course is a continuation of Medical Sciences I. Lecture.

HLTS 570 Anatomy I 4 cr.

This course is designed to focus on the gross anatomy of various regions of the human body. The activities in this course employ a regional approach to the study of human gross anatomy. This course is designed to study the details of the anatomy in the regions of: the superficial aspect of the back; the deep region of the back; the vertebral column; the shoulder; the upper extremity; and the anterior and lateral regions of the neck. The course consists of both a lecture and a laboratory component. Lecture sessions present information pertaining to correct anatomical terminology; gross anatomy; and the organization and relationships of the various structures found in the above listed regions of the body. A dissection laboratory is a required component to the course. In the dissection laboratory the student, under the supervision of faculty, will dissect and study human cadavers. Efforts are made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in both lecture and laboratory sessions to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L and BIOL 112/112L or their equivalent; or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

HLTS 570L Anatomy I Laboratory 0 cr.

This course is the laboratory component of the HLTS 570 Anatomy I course. The activities in this course include dissection of human cadavers, the study of prosected human cadaveric material, the study of human skeletons and skeletal models, and the study of various organ models. This course employs a regional approach to the study of human gross anatomy. It is designed to study the details of the anatomy in the regions of: the superficial aspect of the back; the deep region of the back; the vertebral column; the shoulder; the upper extremity; and the anterior and lateral regions of the neck. In this dissection laboratory the student, under the supervision of faculty, will dissect and study human cadavers. Efforts are made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in the course to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L and BIOL 112/112L or their equivalent; enrollment in HLTS 470 Anatomy I, or permission of the instructor. Laboratory.

HLTS 571 Anatomy II 4 cr.

This course is designed to focus on the gross anatomy of various regions of the human body. The activities in this course employ a regional approach to the study of human gross anatomy. This course is designed to focus on the regional gross anatomy of the human: thoracic cavity and its contents; the heart; lungs; abdominal cavity and its contents; pelvic cavity and its contents; and the lower extremities. In addition to gross human anatomy the course covers selected topics in embryology. The course consists of both a lecture and a laboratory component. Lecture sessions present information pertaining to the organization and relationships of the various structures found in the above listed regions of the body and selected pertinent topics in embryology. A dissection laboratory is a required component to the course. In the dissection laboratory the student, under the supervision of faculty, will dissect and study human cadavers. Efforts are made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in both lecture and laboratory sessions to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Prerequisites: HLTS 315/315L, 320/320L, 470/470L, 570/570L or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

HLTS 571L Anatomy II Laboratory 0 cr.

This course is the laboratory component of the HLTS 571 Anatomy II course. The activities in this course include dissection of human cadavers, the study of prosected human cadaveric material, the study of human skeletons and skeletal models, and the study of various organ models. This course employs a regional approach to the study of human gross anatomy. It is designed to study the details of the anatomy in the regions of: thoracic cavity and its contents; the heart; lungs; abdominal cavity and its contents; pelvic cavity and its contents; and the lower extremities. In this dissection laboratory the student, under the supervision of faculty, will dissect and study human cadavers. Efforts are made to assist the course participants to utilize the information presented in the course to answer medically/clinically relevant questions. Prerequisites: HLTS 315/315L, 320/320L, 470/470L, 570/570L; enrollment in HLTS 471 Anatomy II, or permission of the instructor. Laboratory.

HLTS 580 Physiology I 3 cr.

This course presents the normal functions of the human body. Molecular and physical mechanisms are highlighted at all levels of structural organization, from cells to organ systems. Topics in this first part of a two-course sequence range from the structure and function of cells and tissues, to homeostatic regulation by the major control systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L and BIOL 112/112L; CHEM 121 and 122 or permission of the instructor. Lecture.

HLTS 581 Physiology II 4 cr.

This course continues the presentation of normal functions of the human body. Pertinent examples of pharmacologic and pathophysiologic mechanisms are used to reinforce concepts of normal physiologic design. Topics in this second part of a two-course sequence include all of the major systems that perform coordinated and integrated functions. The goal for the student is to achieve a good understanding of total body function based upon the organization, functional mechanisms, and interactions of these systems. Prerequisites: HLTS 330, 480 or 580 and 315/315L, 320/320L, or 470/470L or 570/570L. Lecture.

HLTS 590 Study Abroad-Health Sciences 6 cr.

This program gives students the opportunity to tour public and private hospitals, outpatient clinics, and public health facilities and interact with clinicians and health care personnel. During the trip, students will have opportunities to compare and contrast the European and African healthcare systems to the US system and discuss how patient care can be impacted. There are no pre-requisite courses. Information will be distributed to interested students during the Fall semester and a series of pre-departure class meetings will be held during the Spring semester. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

HLTS 603 Neuroscience 4 cr.

This course will acquaint you with the elements of the nervous system and how those elements interact to produce behavior. By the end of this course you will be able to encounter a neurological evaluation of an impaired client and be able to predict the portions of nervous system that are damaged. To accomplish this goal, the nervous system will be examined first at a gross anatomical level, and occasionally at the level of the cell. Groups of neurons, or systems, and their interaction will be discussed in detail with a focus on the clinical manifestations of nervous system damage. Wherever appropriate to understanding disease or treatment, the contribution of independent cellular events to the functioning of a system will be described. Pre req. HLTS 320/L, 470/L or 570/L, HLTS 321/L, 471/L or 571/L; HLTS 330/480/580, and HLTS 331/481/581. Lecture.

IBUS 341 International Business 3 cr.

This course is an introductory study of the environment and management of cross-national business activities. Topics include sociocultural, legal and political environment; international monetary and financial systems; international trade; foreign direct and portfolio investments; and the management of international marketing, financial, production and personnel functions. Lecture.

IBUS 343 European Studies 3 cr.

Study abroad opportunities with a number of universities are available. Students should check with their advisors in the School of Business Administration regarding both opportunities and the possibility of transfer of credits. Lecture.

IBUS 345 International Negotiation 3 cr.

International negotiation is a dynamic and complex process by which international organizations and sovereign states resolve international disputes and formulate enduring agreements to support sustainable collaborative multi-organizational and multi-national relations. The course of International Negotiation is the academic opportunity for students to acquire specialized knowledge of negotiation in international setting, and develop familiarity and competency in the dynamics of the process of actual multi-lateral negotiation. The course serves two primary outcomes: First, participants acquire in-depth understanding of theories and concepts of negotiation in international setting. Second, participants develop competency to participate and collaborate in actual international negotiation to build enduring agreement. Concepts and competencies learned in this course have wide applications and make this course valuable component of many academic disciplines. Lecture.

IBUS 369 Export Management 3 cr.

This course offers a comprehensive study of international export procedures and operations. Topics covered include export documentation, managing export transactions, planning export operations, export communications, shipping and packaging, export payment and collection methods, export insurance, governmental and foreign export regulations, export support programs and services, exports within NAFTA, and designing export management systems. Lecture.

IBUS 444 Business and Society in Europe 3 cr.

This course is a survey of the major cultural, social and political factors influencing the conduct of business in Europe. The course includes an overview of the major European economies, a description of the institutions and politics of the European Community, and a detailed examination of business and society in Germany and at least two other European countries. Lecture.

IBUS 448 Business and Society in Latin America 3 cr.

This course is a survey of the major cultural, social, political and economic factors influencing the conduct of business and the prospects for continued economic development in Latin America. The impact of contemporary changes in economic and political conditions on the prospects for long-term economic development is discussed. The course includes a more detailed examination of economic, social and political conditions in Mexico, Brazil and at least one other Latin American country. Lecture.

IHP 104 Honors Inquiry I 3 cr.

This is the first of a two-semester course sequence focusing on a theme chosen by the Course Coordinator and approved by the Honors College. The first semester concentrates on strengthening the student's writing, analysis, and interpretation skills. Required "plenary" sessions will augment lectures and discussion. The course is intended to be taken in the student's freshman year though other arrangements may be made for students whose courses of study do not permit this. This course is required for all Honors College students. Lecture.

IHP 105 Honors Inquiry II 3 cr.

This is the second of a two-semester course sequence focusing on a theme chosen by the Course Coordinator and approved by the Honors College. Faculty from throughout the University will consider how that theme relates to their particular areas of research and expertise. Required "plenary" sessions will augment lectures and discussion. The course is intended to be taken in the student's freshman year though other arrangements may be made for students whose courses of study do not permit this. This course is required for all Honors College students. Lecture.

IHP 111 Honors Problem Solving with Creative Math 3 cr.

Students will learn the skills of creative problem solving strategies, logical reasoning, communication and writing focused on group interaction with a supportive environment. Explore topics in areas such as probability, statistics, graph theory, mathematics in the arts, and topics relevant to everyday life. Lecture. Core Math.

IHP 115 Honors Calculus 4 cr.

Limits, continuity, differentiation of algebraic, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions. An introduction to integration. Lecture. Core Math.

IHP 132 Honors Basic Philosophical Questions 3 cr.

Philosophy, the love of wisdom, is a discipline for discussing basic questions about ourselves and our world. Students read and discuss selected works by major figures throughout the history of philosophy; they are encouraged to think critically and to formulate their own answers to perennial philosophical questions. This course is required for all Honors College students. Lecture. Core Philosophy.

IHP 145 Honors Theology 3 cr.

Theology faculty offer classes each term based upon the faculty member's particular area of expertise and research interest. This course is required for all Honors College students and is only open to them. Lecture.

IHP 199 Honors Special Topics: Honors Tutorial 0 TO 3 cr.

Topics of special interest are offered to Honors College students. Lecture.

IHP 200W Honors Seminar 3 cr.

The Honors College occasionally offers seminars which are of particular or timely interest. The course is writing-intensive and requires independent study and thought. Seminar. University Core Writing Intens.

IHP 201 Honors Seminar - Faith and Reason: 3 cr.

Faculty from throughout the University offer courses that satisfy the Honors College theme area requirement in Faith and Reason. Course content is based on the individual professor's area(s) of expertise and research interest. Section(s) of IHP 201 offered each term are published in the course schedule. Lecture. Theme Area Faith and Reason.

IHP 202 Honors Seminar - Global Diversity: 3 cr.

Faculty from throughout the University offer courses that satisfy the Honors College theme area requirement in Global Diversity. Course content is based on the individual professor's area(s) of expertise and research interest. Section(s) of IHP 202 offered each term are published in the course schedule. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

IHP 203 Honors Seminar - Social Justice 3 cr.

Faculty from throughout the University offer courses that satisfy the Honors College theme area requirement in Social Justice. Course content is based on the individual professor's area(s) of expertise and research interest. Section(s) of IHP 203 offered each term are published in the course schedule. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

IHP 203W Honors Seminar - Social Justice 3 cr.

IHP 204 Honors Seminar - Creative Arts: 3 cr.

Faculty from throughout the University offer courses that satisfy the Honors College theme area requirement in Creative Arts. Course content is based on the individual professor's area(s) of expertise and research interest. Section(s) of IHP 204 offered each term are published in the course schedule. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

IHP 205 Honors International Study Abroad 0 cr.

Honors College students are strongly encouraged to study abroad. This course structures reflection about the transformational nature of international study and how to effectively translate this transformation to future graduate school and employment opportunities. Concurrent enrollment required for Honors College students pursuing Honors College credit for Study Abroad. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

IHP 299 Special Topics in Honors 3 cr.

Topics of special interest are offered to Honors College students. Lecture.

IHP 300 Honors Directed Readings 1 TO 9 cr.

Students engage in independent study and research with a faculty mentor. Permission from the Honors College director required. May be repeated for up to 9 hours credit. Readings.

IHP 301 Honors Seminar - Faith and Reason 3 cr.

Faculty from throughout the University offer courses that satisfy the Honors College theme area requirement in Faith and Reason. Course content is based on the individual professor's area(s) of expertise and research interest. Section(s) of IHP 201 offered each term are published in the course schedule. Seminar. Theme Area Faith and Reason.

IHP 450 Honors Senior Project 3 cr.

This course is an independent study, under the direction of a faculty member, within the student's major field of concentration or other area of personal interest. The Senior Honors Project produces a work of significant scholarship or creativity, as defined by the discipline in which the study is pursued. The components of the Honors Senior Project include: -A research paper or creative work -A reflective paper, commenting on the main paper or work and the experience of preparing it -A discussion of theoretical context which may appear in either the research paper or the reflective paper -An oral presentation or defense of the main paper or work Students will present or defend honors projects before a faculty/student committee; and will submit an electronic copy of the final product of the Honors Senior Project to the Honors College office. Independent Study.

IR 101 Catholic Thought, the State and Security in the Modern World 3 cr.

The increasing tensions of the present security environment can have a strangling effect on the spirit and ethos of moral reason, and faith founded social institutions. The State needs to be secure and have its people secure. Doing so, however, may involve hard choices to do things it would not do ordinarily. How can a principled and faith founded people respond to these exigencies? This course introduces the student to the rich tradition of Roman Catholic thinking on the subject of war, peace, and the State and the dignity of the individual. It will then open a conversation with some of the other approaches to contemporary problems, as well as assess responses to pressing security issues confronting the world. Cross-listed with the International Relations major. Theme Area Faith and Reason.

IR 110 Current Problems in International Relations 3 cr.

A survey of issues that states currently face in world politics. Cross-listed with International Relations. Theme Area Global Diversity.

IR 120 Introduction to Political Economy 3 cr.

An introduction to how government decisions about trade, investment, debt and market developments impact people domestically and worldwide. Special attention is given to the problems experienced by poorer countries and responsibilities of developed nations. No background in the subject matter is required.

IR 130 Introduction to Political Analysis 3 cr.

IR 161 Latin American Civilization 3 cr.

This course spans one thousand years of Latin American history, from 1000 AD to the present. It begins with the largest indigenous societies and then focuses on Spain's invasion of the western hemisphere and the resultant three centuries of Spanish colonial rule. Afterwards, the class examines Latin America's Wars of Independence in the 1820s and the significant changes that took place throughout the region in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The class revolves around political, socioeconomic, and cultural themes. Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

IR 162 East Asian Civilizations 3 cr.

This course surveys the development of East Asian civilization from ancient times to the modern age. Geographically it covers the countries of China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam. Subjects to be examined include religion and thought, political and socio-economic institutions, literary and artistic accomplishments, interactions with the West, and the transition from the traditional to the modern way of life. The course is intended to provide students with a general historical background and help them develop basic historical analytical skills so that they can better understand fundamental themes such as the relationship between diversity and unity in human life. Theme Area Global Diversity.

IR 200 Writing and Research in International Relations 3 cr.

Students will learn to do research and write papers related to IR issues.

IR 206 Japanese Culture 3 cr.

Broad overview of cultural and social topics including social aspects, ethics, and values of the Japanese society. (Taught in English). Theme Area Global Diversity.

IR 208 Comparative Political Systems: Advanced Industrial States 3 cr.

An introduction to government, politics, culture, and economic policy in Europe and Japan. Theme Area Global Diversity.

IR 209 Comparative Political Systems: Developing States 3 cr.

An introduction to government, politics, culture, and economic policy in the developing world.

IR 216 Foundations of International Relations Theory 3 cr.

The goal of this course is to develop understanding of how contemporary international relations theory rests upon a long-standing historical conversation about the conditions for a just international order. Specific objectives include comprehending a) classical realism, idealism, imperialism and cosmopolitanism b) Christian just war theory and cosmopolitanism c) early modern realism, the rise of the state and international law d) modern liberal nationalism and internationalism e) modern cosmopolitanism and imperialism.

IR 245 International Relations 3 cr.

A study of politics between states including sovereignty, balance of power, war, and economics.

IR 251 African History 3 cr.

This course examines some of the various peoples of Africa over the past 500 years, but with an emphasis on the modern era. While the focus will be on cultures and cultural developments, economic conditions and political situations will also be studied. Theme Area Global Diversity.

IR 252 India, Pakistan, and South Asia 3 cr.

This course examines the complex histories of South Asia, from Afghanistan in the west to Bangladesh in the east. The two largest countries, India and Pakistan, garner a great deal of attention, but the whole region is studied, with particular emphasis on the modern period. Theme Area Global Diversity.

IR 253 History of the Modern Middle East 3 cr.

A study of the modern Near East with concentration upon the conflict between imperialism and nationalism, traditionalism and western influences in the area.

IR 254 American Foreign Policy 3 cr.

A study of American foreign policy since World War II.

IR 255 East Asian Civilizations 3 cr.

From the 17th century through the early 20th century Asian societies faced the challenge of European incursions into the region. This course will examine how the Asian peoples confronted the western challenge and the impact that this early globalization had on their politics, economics, and societies.

IR 256 Social History of China 3 cr.

This course examines the historical evolution of Chinese society and various aspects of social life in China. Subjects of study include philosophical and religious influences, major social institutions and customs, marriage and family, gender roles, education and employment, pastime and entertainment. Investigation will be conducted with particular attention to the relationships between tradition and modernity and between China and the West. Theme Area Global Diversity.

IR 258 Bolshevik and Soviet Russia 3 cr.

Russia underwent dynamic political and social changes between the October Revolution in 1917 to the establishment of the Soviet Union in 1922, and from World War II through the Cold War to the Union's collapse between 1985-1991. This course will explore how and why such changes occurred.

IR 261 Modern Central Europe 3 cr.

This course covers the fascinating modern history of the land situated between Germany and Russia focusing on diverse ethnic groups, such as Poles, Croats, Slovaks, Serbs, Slovenes, Ukrainians, and Hungarians. The major themes include struggles for national independence, the impact of Soviet control after World War II, and the reassertion of national sovereignty after the end of the Cold War.

IR 270 Latin American: Conquest to Independence 3 cr.

A survey of Latin America from around 200 AD to the 1820s. The course begins with an in-depth look at the pre-Columbian Maya, Inca, and Aztec civilizations and their conquest by Spain. It then examines the socioeconomic, cultural, and political development of colonial Spanish and Portuguese society and the growing nationalistic tensions that led to the independence movement of the early 19th century.

IR 271 Modern Latin America 3 cr.

A survey of Latin American history since the 1820s that emphasizes the socioeconomic and political development of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Cuba, and Central America. Some of the themes emphasized will be Latin American economic underdevelopment, military rule, revolution, democratization, Liberation Theology, and the impact of these larger issues on the lives of ordinary people.

IR 277 History of Mexico 3 cr.

A survey of more than one thousand years of Mexican history beginning with the ancient Toltec, Mayan and Aztec civilizations and proceeding through the colonial period under Spanish rule. Emphasis is on Mexico since independence in the 1820s, especially political instability, the US-Mexican War, the Porfiriato, the 1910 Mexican Revolution, the PRI's seven decades of one-party rule, the transition to democracy, and NAFTA.

IR 291 History of Japan 3 cr.

This is a survey of Japanese history from antiquity to the present time. Examined are origins of the Japanese nation, the interplay between indigenous elements and outside influences in the making of Japanese culture and institutions, challenges of the modern age and Japanese reactions, militarism and imperialism, the "miracle" of post-war economic recovery and growth, as well as the ongoing dialogue between traditional and modernity in a rapidly changing world.

IR 292 History of Traditional China 3 cr.

This course surveys Chinese history from antiquity to mid-19th century. It traces the evolution of Chinese civilization, investigates major themes and aspects of this process, and examines traditional China in larger historical and cultural contexts to see how the Chinese experience, with its accomplishments and problems, relates to the modern age and outside world.

IR 293 History of Modern China 3 cr.

This is a survey of Chinese history from 1840 to the present. Issues examined include the fate of traditional China in modern times, China's relationship with the West, war and revolution, Mao and the communist movement, reform and economic expansion in the post-Mao era and their efforts on China and the modern world.

IR 295 War and Peace in the Nuclear Age 3 cr.

An examination of the interaction between politics and the use of force in the nuclear age.

IR 305 International Political Communication 3 cr.

IR 307W Italian Culture and Society 3 cr.

Study of major historical, cultural and social developments. (Taught in English) University Core Writing Intens.

IR 308 Post-Conflict Justice and Reconciliation 3 cr.

This course considers how societies and international organizations should respond to crimes against humanity and gross human rights violations committed during civil conflicts, and how the pursuit of justice is compatible with goals of reconciliation between adversaries.

IR 310W Spanish Culture and Society 3 cr.

Study of major historical, cultural and social developments in Spain. (Taught in English). University Core Writing Intens.

IR 321 Government and Politics of Russia and the Independent States 3 cr.

An examination of the political and cultural challenges in democratization and market economy transition.

IR 322 German Culture and Civilization 3 cr.

Study of political, historical, social, cultural, and environmental issues and developments that contribute to the construction of nation and identity in Germany.

IR 322W German Culture and Civilization 3 cr.

Study of political, historical, social, cultural, and environmental issues and developments that contribute to the construction of nation and identity in Germany. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 327W Spanish Culture and Civilization 3 cr.

Analysis of the major historical, cultural and socio-political movements of Spain. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 328W Revolt and Change in Latin America 3 cr.

Nature and types of protest expressed in modern Spanish American literature.

IR 329 Political Economy of Russia and the Independent States 3 cr.

A study of the way in which economic and political forces interact in the restructuring of a nation, with special attention given to trade issues, commercial ventures, banking reform, and environmental questions.

IR 330W Revolt and Change: Protest in Spanish American Literature 3 cr.

Nature and types of protest expressed in modern Spanish American literature. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 345W Ethics and International Relations 3 cr.

The course's principal purposes are to explore the possibilities, limits, and obligations of ethical action in international relations. The course applies the insights of different theories of ethics to a number of issues, including various wars, terrorism, and humanitarian intervention. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 346 World War II 3 cr.

World War II was, simply put, "the largest single event in human history." This course will examine its causes, course and consequences. While the military aspects of the conflict will be discussed in detail, the human factors, political realities and social effects will also be covered.

IR 347 War in Modern Society 3 cr.

A study and analysis of the phenomenon of war in the Western World from the Age of Napoleon to the present, with special emphasis upon the interrelationship between international conflict and social, political, and technological change.

IR 349 United Nations I 1 cr.

Examines the processes and policies of the United Nations. Participation in local and national model United Nations conferences required. Permission of instructor required.

IR 350 United Nations II 1 cr.

Examines the processes and policies of the United Nations. Participation in local and national model United Nations conferences required. Permission of instructor required.

IR 351 US Foreign Relations to World War I 3 cr.

An examination of the history of American foreign relations from the American Revolution to WWI. This is a study of the nation's exercise of sovereignty in foreign affairs, its rise to world power, and the internal and external conflicts that resulted.

IR 352 US Foreign Relations Since 1917 3 cr.

The United States emerged as a major player on the world stage during and after WWI. This course will discuss the role that the country has played in international relations during the course of the 20th century and will also examine the domestic implications of the United States' rise to world dominance. Theme Area Social Justice.

IR 353 United Nations III 2 cr.

Examines the processes and policies of the United Nations. Participation in local and national model United Nations conferences required. Permission of instructor required.

IR 354 United Nations IV 2 cr.

This course examines the processes and policies of the United Nations. Participation in local and national model United Nations conferences required. Permission of instructor required.

IR 360 Crisis Management in Complex Emergencies 3 cr.

This course considers crisis management in theory and practice, drawing from the period since World War II. Theories of crisis prevention, escalation, management, de-escalation, termination, and post-crisis management will be covered. In addition, alternative decision-making theories, structures and processes, the nature of crisis bargaining and negotiation and the role of third parties will be addressed. Special attention will be paid to the role of military force to post-Cold War crisis scenarios. The course will include case studies and a simulation designed to provide context to the study of crisis management.

IR 361 Civil and National Emergencies 3 cr.

IR 372 The Holocaust in Modern History 3 cr.

This course deals with one of the most significant and controversial events of the 20th century: the Nazi effort to totally annihilate Europe's Jews. That one of the most advanced nations embarked on the horrific policy of genocide gives the event a special place in modern history and raises a number of fundamental questions about the very nature of western civilization.

IR 374 The Vietnam Era 3 cr.

The purpose of this course is to create awareness among students of the significance of the Vietnam War in the recent history of the United States. Although the war is over thirty years old, its legacy has loomed over American foreign policy, American consciousness, and the American psyche since its happening.

IR 376 Revolution: Modern Latin America 3 cr.

The course begins with an analysis of different revolutionary theories, followed by an in-depth examination of the Mexican, Cuban, Chilean, and Nicaraguan revolutions of the 20th century. Unsuccessful guerilla movements in Guatemala and Colombia, as well as successful, peaceful social movements pertaining to women's rights also will be examined.

IR 379 East Asia and U.S. 3 cr.

This course introduces students to the history of East Asia's interactions with the United States. Among subjects examined are the political, economic, and cultural contexts in which China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam encountered America; nationalist and imperialist struggles in the Far East and US involvement; the experience of American Christian missions in the region; Communist revolutions in East Asia and US policies; East Asia's economic "miracle" and its effects on the U.S.; and current challenges to peoples of the trans-Pacific community.

IR 381 East Asian History through Film 3 cr.

This course examines East Asia by utilizing both texts and feature films. It is a combination of general survey and topical study, covering major stages and themes in the development of Chinese and Japanese civilizations from ancient times through the modern era.

IR 382 Latin American History: Film 3 cr.

This course examines the last 500 years of Latin American history and uses feature films as its primary source. One-third of the semester will be devoted to the colonial period (1490s to 1820s), and the remaining two-thirds will focus on modern Latin America (1820s to present). The course and films emphasize Latin America's social and cultural evolution.

IR 385 International Law and Organization 3 cr.

Examines the historical development and present role played by international law and organizations. Theme Area Social Justice.

IR 390 Asian Politics 3 cr.

Examines key issues in Asian politics including democratization and the state; the role of religion, caste, ethnicity, and gender; and problems of population, poverty, and development. Countries considered include China, Japan, Korea, India, Malaysia, and Singapore. Theme Area Global Diversity.

IR 392 Germany: Kaiser to Hitler 3 cr.

The history of Germany from the collapse of the empire to the destruction of the Third Reich. Emphasizing political, social and economic aspects of the German Experience.

IR 393 Political and Economic Geography 3 cr.

IR 394 Historical Geography 3 cr.

A survey of the physical world which is the basis for a human civilization, past, present, and future. What are the possibilities and limitations of different places for human development? How successful or unsuccessful were human settlements? Emphasis also on geography as an intellectual discipline and cultural phenomenon.

IR 399W Italy and the European Union 3 cr.

Italy's political and economic role in the European Union. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 400 Spanish Cinema 3 cr.

Evolution of the Spanish cinema after Franco. Review of selected films produced since the introduction of democracy to Spain. Special emphasis on the social, cultural, political, and economic changes in the country under democratic government.

IR 400W Spanish Cinema 3 cr.

Evolution of the Spanish cinema after Franco. Review of selected films produced since the introduction of democracy to Spain. Special emphasis on the social, cultural, political, and economic changes in the country under democratic government. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 401W Survey of Spanish Literature I: El Cid to el Siglo de Oro 3 cr.

Survey of major works from the Medieval period to the 17th century. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 402W Italian Cinema 3 cr.

Review of selected films with special emphasis on the social, cultural, political, and economic changes in Italy. (Taught in English) University Core Writing Intens.

IR 407 Terrorism 3 cr.

How does an open society counter an organization opposed to democratic freedoms, yet modeled on a Fortune 500 company and exploiting all the assets of an open society? In a globalized environment borders have become largely fluid and social groupings segue into each other with often explosive results. The impetus for terrorist acts is growing; identify the main causes of terrorism as a military, social, economic, and constructivist phenomena. It will survey the function and utility of terrorism as a path for groups or states which employ it and review responses which are available to the Open Society and the international system.

IR 408W Democracy, Conflict and World Politics 3 cr.

This course examines power, conflict and democratization primarily in countries outside the U.S. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 409W Ethnic Conflict: Politics and Policy 3 cr.

Investigates ethnic identity, ethnic political movements and parties, ethnic conflict and genocide, and conflict reduction policies. Focuses primarily on countries other than the United States. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 412 Arab Israeli Conflict 3 cr.

The clash between Jewish Zionists and the Arab peoples of Palestine and surrounding countries has been a focal point of world politics for roughly the last 100 years. It has involved six wars, as well as near-continual violence short of outright war. This course is designed to make the major issues comprehensible and to enable students to begin to form their own assessments of what is needed for a just and lasting resolution. Through readings,films, discussion, and simulation exercises, the class explores the political, social, economic, psychological , and cultural dynamics of the conflict, as well as questions such as why the conflict has proven so difficult to resolve, how the conflict resembles and differs from other cases of protracted conflict between ethnic and national groups, and what factors have motivated U.S. policy toward the conflict.

IR 413W Human Rights: Politics and Policy 3 cr.

This course explores the international human rights regime including philosophical sources, legal instruments, governmental and non-state actors, and impacts on the international system. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 419 Ethnic Conflict: Politics and Policy 3 cr.

Ethnic conflict threatens political stability in countries around the world. From Iraq to Bolivia, from Spain to Indonesia, conflicts have erupted over a wide variety of "ethnic" issues in recent years. Yet despite its ubiquity, ethnic politics remains poorly understood: Why do people identify with ethnic groups? Why does ethnic identity sometimes lead to private ritual, sometimes to peaceful mobilization through mass movements or political parties, and sometimes to violent conflict, pogroms and genocide? Most pressingly, are there solutions to ethnic conflict, particularly in deeply-divided, violence-ridden countries?

IR 419W European Union 3 cr.

This course is the study of the history and politics of the European Union, including its multicultural nature, economy, role and impact on today's world and its relations with the US. Taught in English. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 422 American Defense Policy 3 cr.

This course studies the institutions, policies, and decision making of the American defense establishment.

IR 422W American Defense Policy 3 cr.

THis course studies the institutions, policies, and decision making of the American defense establishment.

IR 423 Comparative Intelligence Agencies 3 cr.

An examination of the development, structure and usage of intelligence agencies with particular emphasis on how such functions impact upon national policy makers and the policy making process. The primary focus of the course centers on a study of the CIA, British M16 and Russian KGB/FSB.

IR 423W Comparative Intelligence Agencies 3 cr.

An examination of the development, structure and usage of intelligence agencies with particular emphasis on how such functions impact upon national policy makers and the policy making process. The primary focus of the course centers on a study of the CIA, British M16 and Russian KGB/FSB. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 425W 19th Century Europe 3 cr.

An examination of the European experience between 1815 and 1914, with emphasis on political, social, and cultural trends. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 426 20th Century Europe 3 cr.

A study of the European experience between 1914 and the present, centering on such topics as the great wars, fascism, and contemporary trends in both eastern and western Europe.

IR 426W 20th Century Europe 3 cr.

A study of the European experience between 1914 and the present, centering on such topics as the great wars, fascism, and contemporary trends in both eastern and western Europe. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 428 Global Energy Policy 3 cr.

The impact oil and natural resource issues have on decision making by governments and international organizations. Global market impacts and the activities of multinational cartels are also studied.

IR 428W British Empire 3 cr.

This course will examine some of the major political, social, economic and cultural aspects of the history of the British Empire since 1783. These include the abolition of slavery, the impact of industrialization on the empire, imperial wars, the expansion of empire into Africa, the world wars in an imperial context, and decolonization. Different historiographic themes will be analyzed in different semesters. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 429 International Conflict: Mediation and Negotiation 3 cr.

Examines how negotiation and mediation, or "assisted negotiation," can help to end international disputes peacefully. In-class simulation exercises, along with readings and films, provide theoretical and practical understandings of the mediation and negotiation processes and how they fit into the broader context of international conflict resolution. Particular topics include the strength and limitations of different types of mediators, obstacles to mediation success as well as circumstances that contribute to successful interventions, and ethical and justice related issues in peacemaking.

IR 429W International Conflict: Mediation and Negotiation 3 cr.

IR 438W Global Energy Policy 3 cr.

The impact oil and natural resource issues have on decision making by governments and international organizations. Global market impacts and the activities of multinational cartels are also studied. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 442W Global Public Policy 3 cr.

This course examines the policymaking process at the global level, including (1) conflicts over policy in international institutions such as the UN and (2) international influences on domestic policymaking. It focuses on the role of states and international organizations, as well as the media and nongovernmental organizations. Topics considered include the International Criminal Court; anti-personnel landmines; gun control; genetically modified foods; and definitions of the family. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 445W Imperial Russia 3 cr.

An investigation of the political, social, and intellectual evolution of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th centuries. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 446W 20th C Russia: Romanovs to Putin 3 cr.

This course examines the challenges to and overthrow of the Romanov rule, the rise and fall of the Soviet Union, and the creation of the new Russia since 1991. It explores political, social and cultural issues. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 450W The Cold War 3 cr.

An analysis of the diplomatic and political struggle between the United States and the Soviet Union in the aftermath of the Second World War and the ideological conflict between free enterprise and communism around the world. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 453W Trends in Latin American Literature 3 cr.

Major movements and representative works from Pre-Columbian period to the present. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 455 Theories of Conflict 3 cr.

This class examines major social science theories of conflict. Emphasis is on the need for theories to inform our ability to resolve conflicts. The course blends findings from conventional disciplines of sociology, psychology, and counseling with new understandings being developed in research on deep-rooted conflicts. Special attention is given to insights gained from the emerging conflict transformation orientation. Analysis is a critical tool to be used in conflict resolution and societal transformation. This course includes interpersonal, group, as well as international conflicts, violence, revolution, and war.

IR 458W Contemporary Spanish Novel 3 cr.

IR 460W El Quijote 3 cr.

An in-depth study of Cervantes' novel with an emphasis on its cultural and historical context. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 461W French Culture and Civilization 3 cr.

The major cultural and socio-political movements of France through its literary works. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 463W Survey of French Literature II: 18th Century to Modern Period 3 cr.

Main authors and movements from the 18th Century to the present. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 475 East and West in Film and Print 3 cr.

Survey of recent award-winning filmmakers and Nobel Literature Laureates from non-Western European cultures, including Japan, China, Iran, Egypt, Poland, and the Czech Republic. Taught in English.

IR 476W Eastern and Central Europe in Film and Print 3 cr.

Representative films and literature from Russia, Poland, Slovakia, Ukraine, and the Balkans, presented in a cultural and historical context. Taught in English. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 477W Classics of Modern European Cinema 3 cr.

The major movements of Western European cinema, including Italian Neorealism, French New Wave, British Social Realism, New German Cinema, Spanish Surrealism and Postmodernism, illustrated with the works of DeSica, Godard, Reisz, Fellini, Buñuel, Bergman, Wenders, Leigh and others. Taught in English. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 479W Diplomatic History of the United States 3 cr.

An examination of the various topics and interpretations of the history of American foreign relations of WWI. This is a study of the nation's rise to world power and the internal and external conflicts that resulted. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 482W Inter-American Relations 3 cr.

An examination of U.S.-Latin American relations since the mid-19th century. Topics covered will include Manifest Destiny and the U.S.-Mexican War, the Spainish-Cuban-American War of 1898, the construction of the Panama Canal, U.S. economic and military penetration of the Caribbean and Central America, the Good Neighbor policy, the CIA-backed coup in Guatemala, the Bay of Pigs invasion, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the U.S. invasion of the Dominican Republic, the Contra War in Nicaragua, NAFTA, Latin American migration to the U.S., and Narco traffic. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 483 Mexico and the U.S. 3 cr.

This course focuses on U.S.-Mexican relations since the 19th century and covers the Texas rebellion and annexation, the U.S.-Mexican War, American economic penetration during the Porfiriato, U.S. military intervention in the Mexican Revolution, the expropriation of American-owned lands and oil companies in the 1930s, Mexican migration to and repatriation from the U.S., the Mexican foreign debt crisis, the narcotics trade, NAFTA, and the Mexican immigrant community in the United States.

IR 483W Mexico and the U.S. 3 cr.

This course focuses on U.S.-Mexican relations since the 19th century and covers the Texas rebellion and annexation, the U.S.-Mexican War, American economic penetration during the Porfiriato, U.S. military intervention in the Mexican Revolution, the expropriation of American-owned lands and oil companies in the 1930s, Mexican migration to and repatriation from the U.S., the Mexican foreign debt crisis, the narcotics trade, NAFTA, and the Mexican immigrant community in the United States. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 484W United States and China: 20th Century 3 cr.

Located on the opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean, East Asia and the United States historically played important roles in each other's life. This course examines the complex relationship between America and East Asian countries, covering the economic, cultural, political and military aspects of the interaction. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 485 China in Revolution 3 cr.

This course investigates changes in China during the 20th century, with a focus on the Chinese communist movement. Topics examined include the meaning of revolution in the Chinese context; ideology, causes, events, and personalities of the Chinese revolution; consequences and impact of the revolutionary movement.

IR 485W China in Revolution 3 cr.

This course investigates changes in China during the 20th century, with a focus on the Chinese communist movement. Topics examined include the meaning of revolution in the Chinese context; ideology, causes, events, and personalities of the Chinese revolution; consequences and impact of the revolutionary movement. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 488W China and the West 3 cr.

This course explores China's encounters with the West from early times through the modern age, with an emphasis on cultural exchanges. It opens with a survey of Chinese history and Sino-Western interactions over time and then focuses on topics such as the Silk Road, the Chinese Empire and the Philosophies, Christianity in China, American influence and Chinese liberalism, Marxism and Chinese communist revolution, Chinese culture in the West and Western presence in China today. University Core Writing Intens.

IR 491 Internship 1 TO 3 cr.

IR 493W Directed Readings 1 TO 6 cr.

IR 496 Special Topics: 3 cr.

IR 499 Advanced International Relations Theory 3 cr.

The central substantive aim of the course is to develop a deep and nuanced understanding of how different theories explain international politics and which ones are most persuasive under what conditions. Theories are important because they affect both how we interpret our environment and how we respond to it. Theories, in short, drive action. Theories representing all of the major approaches to the study of world politics (material, institutional, and ideational) and levels of analysis (international, domestic, and individual) will be examined. A central objective of the class is for students to develop their critical reading abilities, i.e., What are the authors read in the class arguing? What are the strengths and weaknesses of each piece? What are the authors' (often hidden) assumptions? Correctly answering these questions is important not only in the context of this class, but in terms of how you - current citizens and future leaders - see the world.

IR 499W Adv International Theroy 3 cr.

ISYS 283 Business Info Systems 3 cr.

Provides the student with an overview of the theory and implementation of today's information systems. The student will develop an understanding of information system theory and study the flow of information through the organization to learn how managers at different levels use information as a strategic resource. Database applications as they relate to the organization are emphasized. Lecture.

ISYS 381W Systems Analysis and Design 3 cr.

A detailed study of all phases of the system life cycle with emphasis on structured analysis and design and object-oriented techniques. Case studies are used to generate detailed data flow diagrams. The issues involving conversion, testing, training, documentation, maintaining and managing a system are addressed. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

ISYS 382 Data and Information Management 3 cr.

Focuses on the design, implementation and management of organizational databases using database management systems. Students will design a conceptual, logical and physical database. Then, using the physical database and a commercial database package, students will develop reports interactively and by imbedding database calls into COBOL programs. Emphasis will be on the relational model and its standard language, Structured Query Language. Offered in the fall semester. Lecture.

ISYS 383 Business Intelligence 3 cr.

Research shows that business intelligence (BI) technology is evolving and that organizations on the cutting edge of these new trends can gain significant competitive advantage. Business intelligence is a set of methodologies, processes, architectures, and technologies that transform raw data (both internal and external to the organization) into meaningful and useful information. Simply put, the primary objective of BI is to support better business decision-making by exploiting relevant and timely information. Thus, BI systems can rightly be called a decision support systems designed to infuse more effective strategic, tactical, and operational insight into the decision-making process. Lecture.

ISYS 384 Information Systems Project Management 3 cr.

This course discusses the processes, methods, techniques and tools that organizations use to manage their information systems projects. The course covers a systematic methodology for initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing projects. This course assumes that project management in the modern organization is a complex team-based activity, where various types of technologies (including project management software as well as software to support group collaboration) are an inherent part of the project management process. This course also acknowledges that project management involves both the use of resources from within the firm, as well as contracted from outside the organization. Lecture.

ISYS 387 Systems Development & Implementation 3 cr.

This course provides an introduction to object-oriented programming and Web-based applications using the Java object-oriented language. Emphasis is given in the logical development of Java applications. Java Applets, program control, methods, arrays, strings and characters, graphics, basic and advanced graphical user interface components, exception handling, multithreading, multimedia, networking data structures and Java utilities. Lecture.

ISYS 481 IT Infrastructure 3 cr.

This course provides an introduction to IT infrastructure issues for students majoring in Information Systems. It covers topics related to both computer and systems architecture and communication networks, with an overall focus on the services and capabilities that IT infrastructure solutions enable in an organizational context. It gives the students the knowledge and skills that they need for communicating effectively with professionals whose special focus is on hardware and systems software technology and for designing organizational processes and software solutions that require in-depth understanding of the IT infrastructure capabilities and limitations. It also prepares the students for organizational roles that require interaction with external vendors of IT infrastructure components and solutions. The course focuses strongly on Internet-based solutions, computer and network security, business continuity, and the role of infrastructure in regulatory compliance Lecture.

ISYS 483 Enterprise Systems 3 cr.

This course provides an overview of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems, focusing on the strategic use of these systems to help businesses achieve organizational goals. ERP software is an implementation of best-in-class business processes. It simulates real-world business functions, provides seamless integrated information for business operations and decision-making, and supports the enterprise in linking, utilizing, allocating and controlling its resources on a real-time basis. Students learn how an ERP enhances enterprise performance by streamlining enterprise processes, optimizing its resources, and allowing it to make quick, accurate, and consistent decisions. Lecture.

ISYS 485 IT Audit and Control 3 cr.

This course presents the fundamental concepts of information technology audit and control from a risk-based perspective. The primary focus is on information controls, the types of controls within an organization, and the management and audit of those controls. Students also explore the concepts and techniques of the audit process, with particular attention given to transaction-based systems, processing cycles, and the impact on financial reporting in an organization. Students learn the process of creating a control structure with goals and objectives, and audit an information technology infrastructure using that structure. Lecture.

ISYS 486 IT Security and Risk Management 3 cr.

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles and topics of Information Technology Security and Risk Management at the organizational level. Students will learn critical security principles that enable them to plan, develop, and perform security tasks. The course will address hardware, software, processes, communications, applications, and policies and procedures with respect to organizational IT Security and Risk Management. Lecture.

ISYS 489 IS Strategy, Management, and Acquisition 3 cr.

Students are expected to use tools and techniques learned in prior MIS courses to develop an information system. Using Computer-Aided Software Engineering products and fourth generation languages, students design and implement a project chosen from the local business or University community. Students work in teams toward a solution. Lecture.

ISYS 489W Systems Integration 3 cr.

This course explores the management and governance of information systems in organizations, with particular attention given to the use of IS in facilitating and supporting the operational, administrative and strategic goals of the organization. Students explore the design and development of strategic information architectures, critically assess existing IS infrastructures and emerging technologies, and study how these enabling technologies impact organizational strategy. The goal of this course is to develop IS leadership skills that will allow students to make sense of an increasingly globalized and technology-intensive business environment. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

JMA 177 Language for Journalists 0 cr.

Teaches students the basic rules of English grammar and Associated Press style. Co-requisite: JMA 271W Lecture.

JMA 201 Fundamentals of Application Development 3 cr.

This course provides the student with an overview of application development. The student will study the development methodology of a data enabled application. Concepts include control structures, consistent interface design, development and implementation of algorithms, and validation and storage of data. Lecture.

JMA 220 Introduction to Media Advertising 3 cr.

This course focuses on the contemporary practices and principles of the ever-changing nature of advertising across different media. Particular emphasis on (1) the development of adversting as the economic lifeblood of media, (2) the evolving importance of advertising as an integral part of marketing, and (3) evaluating the quality and effectiveness of advertising messages and campaigns. Lecture.

JMA 226 Introduction to Web Design and Development 3 cr.

This course will introduce students to the technical and creative aspects of web page design. Students will study the best ways to add multimedia content including graphics, text, animation, audio, video, and interactive content to web sites. Emphasis is on HTML and a life-cycle model for web development. Lecture.

JMA 230 Introduction to Web Programming 3 cr.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of web page development. Students will learn the basic HTML used to develop web sites and then develop more advanced sites using supplemental tools such as CSS for formatting, graphics, animation, and more. Students will also use the JavaScript language as a beginning programming tool, discussing fundamental concepts such as variables, calculations, functions, program looping and the processing of web-based forms. The course introduces programming terminology and techniques that are used in all other web and multimedia development tools. Students must have available a reliable home computer that can access the Internet. This course is offered for credit (with applicable fee) in conjunction with the Duquesne University College -in-High-School program. Lecture.

JMA 240 Media and Society 3 cr.

The primary objective of this course is to assist you in becoming a critical thinker about the role of media in everyday life. By examining the historical foundations and political economy of (primarily U.S.) media institutions, we will seek to better our understanding of how, why, and to what extent media effect our culture and vice versa. We will accomplish these objectives through a combination of lectures, discussions, assignments, and "debates" on major media issues. Lecture.

JMA 240C Media and Society 3 cr.

Explores the social impact of mass communication through considerations of the (1) functions and uses of all forms of mass communication; (2) socio-political and cultural context of media institutions, delivery systems, technology and diffusion; (3) influence of media content on social constructions of reality; and (4) major theories and research through which we attempt to understand this impact Lecture.

JMA 241 Video Production: Studio 3 cr.

Introduces fundamentals of live television studio production techniques, coupling basic technical and aesthetic considerations. Students examine the production path from idea through final studio production. Full digital production in the Caulfield Digital Media Center on campus. Lecture.

JMA 243 Introduction to Public Relations and Media Relations 3 cr.

Covers the current nature and role of public relations in the mass media and within society, as well as provides an overview of the various strategies employed by public relations professionals to achieve organizational objectives. Topics to be covered include ethics, relevant corporate issues, crisis management, branding, media planning, and integration with other corporate departments. Lecture.

JMA 250 Introduction to Video Production 3 cr.

This is a College in High School course where High School students are introduced to fundamentals of live television studio production techniques, coupling basic technical and aesthetic considerations. Lecture.

JMA 260 New Media Production 3 cr.

New Media Production is an introductory course that provides an overview of the industry standard software that is used to create New Media content. The major objective of the course is to use the tools from the course to develop a New Media Advertising campaign for a real or hypothetical organization. This course satisfies the College Liberal Arts Communication Core requirement. Lecture. Theme Area Creative Arts.

JMA 260J New Media Production 3 cr.

An introductory course for students in Journalism and Public Relations, where students will explore how digital media can add to and enhance the written word. Through this course students will explore several programs that can be used alongside articles and will develop pieces to help enhance written articles. New Media Production will give students the basic tools that will follow them through the curriculum allowing them to bring a new dimension to their writing and advertising. Lecture.

JMA 271W Newswriting 1 3 cr.

Teaches the fundamentals of news reporting and writing, including instruction on how to conduct interviews, discover and organize material, and meet deadlines. Co-requisite: JMA 177 Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

JMA 282 Photojournalism: Digital Imaging 3 cr.

This course is structured to introduce you to the fundamental principles of digital photojournalism and the practical aspects of photographic imaging using the computer technology in use today by media organization. This course will also expose you to the latest techniques and trends in photojournalism and new media publishing. Tell a story with your photographs, edit, scan, tone, crop and caption your photographs. This course will also enable you to prepare digital images for the internet, traditional press and video. Lecture.

JMA 308 Web Interface Design 3 cr.

Web Interface Design students study and apply topics related to web interfaces such as: information architecture, navigation, usability, task analysis, user-centered design, accessibility, and interaction. The course focuses on how to design/develop interfaces for people to perform tasks. Students may use programs such as Dreamweaver to create interfaces with which people must perform tasks such as login, check out, and create discussion boards. Students will work with actual clients to conduct usability tests and to redesign work. Lecture.

JMA 318 Web Design 3 cr.

In this HTML/CSS course, students study and apply typography, layout grids, color, semantic HTML markup, intermediate/advanced CSS, imaging and HTML validation as they build beautiful Web pages. Students model designs such as Zen Garden and create them with HTML and CSS, and get a strong background in semantic (and valid) HTML markup and CSS. Lecture.

JMA 324 Principle of Audio and Video 3 cr.

This course will not only teach the principles of capturing audio and video, but will aid in the application development process, digitalization, editing, and production of digital video for media. Students create DVD and media files that represent techniques and practices being used in the industry today. Lecture.

JMA 326 Multimedia Programming 3 cr.

Students combine text, graphics, sound, animation and video as they build interactive multimedia titles (CDs, DVDs, web pages and games) using packages such as Macromedia Director. Prerequisite: JMA 260 Lecture.

JMA 331 Elements of Flash 3 cr.

Designer uses Flash to create vector-based animations for graphics, text, audio and video and to create rich interactive interfaces and applications. Students will explore the interface, work with images of varying formats, create and format text, create basic animations using tweens, draw and edit shapes, create button symbols and publish and export movies. Lecture.

JMA 333 Introduction to Photography 3 cr.

This courses explores basic photographic concepts, including the effect of apertures and shutter speeds on exposure, depth of field,optics, including focal length and magnification, lighting techniques, using flash as fill, three-light setups, composition, and using Photoshop to improve your pictures. Recommended: Have your own Digital Single Lens Reflex Cameras (DSLR) Lecture.

JMA 340W Media Writing 3 cr.

This class first focuses on writing reports and strategy documents in the advertising business. Second, it focuses on copywriting to create effective, revenue generating advertising messages for various media outlets. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

JMA 341 Video News Gathering and Field Production 3 cr.

Introduces electronic news gathering and electronic field production as remote location video production techniques. Covers pre-production planning and design, on-location production, and post-production editing. Examination of the process and equipment used by reporters in the field and in commercial production. On location lighting and sound are covered along with field production techniques. Lecture.

JMA 345 Web Development Tools 3 cr.

Students will use professional development tools, such as Dreamweaver, that relieve web developers from having to know in-depth programming languages in order to develop sophisticated database-driven websites. Layers, behaviors, animation, style sheets and templates are demonstrated and used. Lecture.

JMA 351 Anchoring, Reporting and Announcing 3 cr.

On Air performance both in Studio and on location. Intended for students with an extensive background in News who wish to pursue careers in Radio and Television. News Analysis is strongly advised. Students discover the keys to researching, gathering, interviewing, and editing news packages and reports. Students utilize broadcast cameras and equipment to report stories and utilize the TV studio to present newscasts. PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR. Pre-req JMA 271W. Lecture.

JMA 357 Streaming Media 3 cr.

Today's media is being delivered on demand and asynchronously. In JMA 357, students discuss compression methods, media server configurations and media capture equipment. Actual streaming web sites will be created and managed by the student. Lecture.

JMA 361 Digital Imaging Techniques 3 cr.

This course concentrates on developing digital imaging skills for the many different types of media in use today. It focuses on the design and production of information for web sites, multimedia, DVD, and video presentation, which communicate through the integrated use of text, images and graphic elements. The cultural significance and theoretical implications of this medium will be explored. Using Adobe Photoshop students will learn techniques for preparing and optimizing photographs and other images for the Web. Lecture.

JMA 367 Radio Writing and Production 3 cr.

Studies and applied principles and practices for writing radio news, and gathering and editing sound for broadcast news stories, in a lecture- laboratory course that includes a field recording component. Lecture.

JMA 371W Newswriting 2 3 cr.

Teaches advanced writing of news stories, such as business, government, and court stories, for a variety of media platforms, and introduces students to in-depth coverage of public issues. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

JMA 372W Writing News Editorials and Columns 3 cr.

Students learn to write persuasive editorials on news subjects as well as a wide range of approaches to writing news commentary. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

JMA 375W Editing for Print 3 cr.

Teaches editing and presentation of the written word for the print news media (including electronic editions) in a lecture-lab course. Prerequisite: JMA 371W Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

JMA 380W Sports Reporting 1: Sportscasting 3 cr.

An introduction to the principles and practices of sports reporting and sportscasting for radio, television and the Internet. Students will gain experience in cultivating sources, covering events, developing features, and presenting their material through various media forms and outlets. Laboratory. University Core Writing Intens.

JMA 381 Sports Reporting II: Sportswriting 3 cr.

This is a continuation and expansion of the work of JMA 380. Students will apply the basics covered in the previous class to both simulated and "real life" sports reporting of events in a workshop format. The course will provide opportunities for students to enhance their skills as writers and on-air personnel for all forms of media--- print, televisual, radio/audio, and the Internet. Pre-req. JMA 380W Lecture.

JMA 385W TV Criticism 3 cr.

This is a genre criticism course from both journalistic and academic perspectives. Genre, socio-cultural and close-textual approaches will be used. Genre will include: soap operas, situation comedies, crime-dramas, sports, children's programming, game shows, religious television, etc. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

JMA 402 Visual Design and Layout 3 cr.

This studio course teaches students how to display complex information clearly and beautifully. Students will learn how to organize type, images, and raw data into communications. Lecture.

JMA 405 Graphic Design Process 3 cr.

After a foundation in the graphic design process, students will utilize vector graphic software, such as Illustrator and inDesign to create elaborate new media content. Lecture.

JMA 406 3D Modeling Principles 3 cr.

This course introduces students to the artistic and technical elements associated with creating three-dimensional computer generated imagery. Concepts include shape, composition, lighting, shading, and the development of the industry and processes involved in producing 3D computer animation. Students design, create, model and render life like images. Pre-req: JMA 260 Lecture.

JMA 407 3D Animation Principles 3 cr.

Building on concepts covered in 3D Modeling Principles (JMA 406), students develop an advanced understanding of two-dimensional animation software (compositing layers, camera movements, visual effects, etc.) They are introduced to three-dimensional animation software (modeling, lighting and basic visual effects, etc.) Issues relating to the design and aesthetics of computer animation are discussed.Pre req - JMA 406. Lecture.

JMA 408 Introduction to Book Publishing 3 cr.

Provides an introduction to the book publishing process from manuscript acquisition and development to design, printing and binding. Lecture.

JMA 409 Character Animation 3 cr.

Character animation is about an artist bringing a character to life. The student practices with 2D and 3D animation software to draw or pose characters, but also will learn to develop a sense of timing, of observation, mannerisms, and movement. Students also learn to be an actor, having a sense of what makes something alive and natural and how to bring an inanimate character to life. This course ranges from conventional character animation techniques such as walk cycles and lip sync to computer animation, along with tips for giving characters the illusion of life. PRE-REQ: JMA 407. Lecture.

JMA 410 Public Relations Strategies and Case Studies 3 cr.

The purpose of this course is to provide public relations students with an opportunity to learn from case study analysis and to apply this knowledge to practical situations. Cases will be selected from a variety of public relations industries including sports, entertainment, higher education, healthcare, and nonprofit organizations. Students will be required to identify, analyze, solve, write and present information in an effective manner. At the end of this course, students should be able to identify how to integrate public relations as a management function into an overall organizational strategy; identify the public relations implications of management decisions; identify constituencies affected by management decisions; write a comprehensive communications strategy; support managerial decisions with public relations actions; and evaluate effectiveness of public relations activities. Lecture.

JMA 411 International Media 3 cr.

An overview and analysis of international media systems and processes. Particular emphasis on mediated within and between nation states. Class typically requires an international travel experience at an additional cost. Pre-req: JMA 411P Lecture.

JMA 411P International Media Prep 0 cr.

Preparation for the International Media class. Held in summer.This is a 0 credit course in preparation for the trip abroad. Other.

JMA 412 Literary Journalism 3 cr.

Literary Journalism explores the fusion of nonfiction narrative writing and the methods and conventions of literature. In addition to studying and discussing classics and contemporary stories in the Literary Journalism oeuvre - covering topics such as war, crime, sports, and so-called "Gonzo Journalism" - students will report and write their own literary journalism stories; a good number of these stories are eventually published in campus media. Pre-req. JMA 271W and JMA 371W. Lecture.

JMA 413 Non-Profit Public Relations 3 cr.

Explores the role of public relations within organizations devoted to community service and interaction. In addition to gaining an understanding of the different types of non- profit organizations, students will also learn to adapt traditional public relations practices and techniques to the not for profit context. Additional topics to be covered include grant proposals, identifying funding sources and promoting fundraisers. Pre-req JMA 243. Lecture.

JMA 414 Media History 3 cr.

A survey course of significant developments and trends in Western media history. Lecture.

JMA 415 Cultural Photography 3 cr.

The course will begin with the history of photo documentary and photojournalism, identifying the practices and themes that gave rise to visual sociology in the 1970s. Students will complete photo assignments on such themes as social interaction, identity and material culture. How to construct visual arguments, including strategies for constructing articles, books, photo displays, websites, and other forms of presentation will be discussed. Lecture.

JMA 417 Critical Studies in Mass Media 3 cr.

In this course we will consider the forces behind the evolution of the media into its current commercial system. The ethical, social, economic, and political implications of today's massive media corporations -- as well as their effect upon what we see, read, and know -- will also be discussed. Lecture.

JMA 418W Public Relations Campaigns 3 cr.

Students learn advanced internal and external Public Relations principles and multimedia production. Students will complete a PR campaign, learning strategy, writing and production. Pre-req: JMA 271W; JMA 405; JMA 410 JMA 466. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

JMA 419 Advertising Campaigns, Writing and Production 3 cr.

Advertising is one of a constellation of media institutions. In this CAPSTONE course, students learn advanced advertising methods and practices within the context of the larger media practices. Students design an advertising campaign for a client utilizing their journalism, advertising, broadcasting and multimedia production skills. The course emphasizes advertising research, strategy, writing and production. Pre-req JMA 220, JMA 340W, JMA 422, JMA 405, JMA 467 OR with permission of the professor. Lecture.

JMA 420 Special Event Design and Management 3 cr.

Students will acquire an in-depth knowledge of special event planning processes and techniques and will become familiar with management techniques and strategies required for successful planning, promotion, implementation and evaluation. Lecture.

JMA 421 Sex, Myth and Media 3 cr.

Examines the role of mass media in reinforcing or challenging common cultural definitions of masculinity and feminity and power relationships between the sexes. In analyzing various mass media -- including print, television, internet publishing, electronic games, and film -- we will apply gender theory and connect these artifacts to their historical moment. Lecture.

JMA 422 Advertising Strategy and Case Studies 3 cr.

This course focuses on developing strategy building skills by critical and thorough analysis of commercial and social advertising cases. Students will (1) conduct secondary research, (2) analyze marketing, media, and creative strategies, and (3) develop alternative strategies to utilize multimedia for national and international advertising. Prerequisite: JMA 220 Lecture.

JMA 423 Media Sales and Promotion 3 cr.

Explains the multi-faceted dimension of sales within contemporary business environments with special emphasis on the tools for media sale and the tools for successful media promotion and branding. Lecture.

JMA 424 Media Production 3 cr.

Using the multimedia development life cycle as a model, students will use general purpose new media software, such as Premiere and Encore to create DVD's and Websites. Students form a production team, design a large-scale project, and then apply project and management skills. Course should be taken during last semester of study. Lecture/Lab.

JMA 427 Introduction to Desktop Publishing 3 cr.

Today's world of digital production relies on computer applications that facilitate the creation, editing and distribution of print documents. Students in this course will use software such as In-Design and Illustrator to apply concepts of page layout, concepts of design elements, illustration, and printing standards, as well as examining how to create or select, size and place artwork. Pre-req JMA 260 Lecture.

JMA 428 Server Side Scripting 3 cr.

Students focus on the development of dynamic websites using Microsoft's server side Active Server Pages language. Students will build sites with database connectivity providing data storage and content management functionality. Concepts include data connections, sessions, validation, and use of controls used to make a web site. Prereq: JMA475 Lecture.

JMA 430 Digital Imaging for Multi Media 3 cr.

Methodologies and techniques for using both traditional photography and the computer in creating and manipulating digital imagery. Students in this very hands on course will explore a variety of creative techniques for producing, editing, and altering images using computer software and digital tools.Emphasis will be on using photoshop as a tool in the process of image creation, manipulation and enhancement for visual expression and communication. This course emphasizes the aesthetic, technical and conceptual practices of image making. Technical, historical, and conceptual issues will be addressed through lectures, demonstrations, exercises, projects and readings. Lecture.

JMA 431 Advanced Flash Programming 3 cr.

An advanced look at Flash's programming language, ActionScript provides the base for sophisticated interactive applications that include audio, digital video, connections to databases. Students will be able to use ActionScript to control objects within Flash files, create and publish ActionScript movies, add actions to a movie file, and utilize common ActionScript commands, arguments, properties, and syntaxes. Prerequisites JMA 331 and JMA 260. Lecture.

JMA 432 Advanced Digital Photography 3 cr.

This course is aimed at enthusiastic photographers who wish to take control of Digital Image making and with basic photo skills interested in mastering digital imaging. In this class, students will use digital cameras and computer software to create original works of art. Students will be introduced to the following three areas: (1)Digital imaging technology (cameras and editing software), (2) Photo composition and lighting, and (3) Printing and electronic distribution. This course will encourage you to shoot RAW images and seek to enhance your Digital workflow system using popular software and digital imaging techniques. Previous experience with Photoshop or other digital image manipulation tools is required. Students are encouraged to develop various forms of composition such as photography for science, art or publication. Lecture/Lab.

JMA 434 Media and Sports 3 cr.

Students will critically view the role of sport media in American culture. The influence of relationships between sport media and issues such as race, gender, nationalism, capitalism/consumerism, violence, and civic life will be discussed. Issues in relation to journalism ethics and the production of sport media will also be examined. Lecture.

JMA 436 Media Sports Practices 3 cr.

Examines and applies public relations, publicity, marketing and advertising, media coordination, and event organization and management skills necessary for success in the sports industry. Utilizing the broadcast studio, students will also gain more insight and application in sports television, web and radio. Lecture.

JMA 438 Gaming Essentials 3 cr.

Students will look at game level design principles and basic game theory. A 3D game engine will be used to implement a level, with emphasis on texture, level flow, and scriptable environmental objects. Concurrently, the course will examine the process of writing a game design document. Lecture.

JMA 439 Game Level Design 3 cr.

In this course, students continue to study existing game paradigms and use an existing game engine to develop multiple levels, adding various terrains, varying lighting conditions, building, then incorporating 3D models. Prerequisite: JMA 438 Lecture.

JMA 440 Professional Development and Project Management 3 cr.

Explores key issues in making a living as a multimedia professional. Students learn about the management of assets, time and team relationships through practical exercises. Topics include accounting practices, marketing and self promotion, preparing resumes, costing, proposal writing and the production pipeline. Lecture.

JMA 442 Sound Design 3 cr.

This course is an introduction to the role audio and sound have in a variety of distribution media. This course also is an introduction to the production techniques, technology, and artisitic aspects of appropriately applying sound in a variety of distribution media. Lecture.

JMA 443 Mass Media and Everyday Life 3 cr.

Examines theories and research in the field of mass media (notably television) and society. Lecture.

JMA 446 Sound Design II 3 cr.

This will build upon the concepts introduced in the Sound Design I course. Specifically Sound Design II will cover: Functional Sound Design for Film, Theatre and Radio Drama. The course will introduce transactional Sound Design for products such as games and other similar interactive products. Sound Design II will cover advanced Digital Audio Workstation concepts including: advanced editing, recording session management, mixing, mastering, MIDI, advanced digital sound processing and project portability. Sound Design II will also introduce audio encoding formats for open and proprietary delivery. Students considering Sound Design II should have successfully completed the Sound Design I course. Lecture.

JMA 447 Developing Android Applications 0 TO 1 cr.

Google's Web-based appinventor allows you to create Android apps without having to learn programming or Java, which is the underlying language of Android apps. Instead, you add objects to a Web page and fit them together like a giant jigsaw puzzle. Each object has its own unique collection of properties that you can set. You do not need an Android phone because appinventor includes a phone emulator so you can see what your app will look like when you port it to your phone. Lecture.

JMA 448 XML Programming 3 cr.

XML is a markup language used in information systems to share data. Students will examine the core XML language syntax, schemas for validation, and transformation for presentation and consumption of XML data in different environments such as jQuery and PHP. Prereq: JMA22 6and JMA472 Lecture.

JMA 449 NewsRoom Operations 6 cr.

Students function as newsroom "employees" in a producing a television newscast. Students receive experience in EVERY POSITION in a working newsroom: Reporter/Anchor, Photojournalist/Videographer, Editor, Assignment Editor, Writer, Camera Operator, Audio Operator, Playback, Control Room Director, and Technical Director. Students produce regularly-scheduled newscasts as the result of their work inthe field and in the studio. Lecture.

JMA 450 Content Management Systems 3 cr.

Students will utilize one or more open source Content Management Systems to create websites that make it possible for non-technical users to publish content to a website. The content is saved in a database and may include text, images, video clips and so on. Lecture.

JMA 451 Internship 1 TO 9 cr.

Provides a supervised observation/experience program of study (assignment and performance) in such areas as web design, post-production development, instructional design and multimedia production. Internship.

JMA 453 Advanced Media Writing 3 cr.

Teaches writing for radio and television in a lecture-laboratory course. Lecture.

JMA 457 Developing IPhone Applications 2 cr.

Using the latest versions of HTML, JavaScript, and XCode/Cocoa development tools, students will learn to build applications and interfaces for Apple mobile devices. User interface elements, media manipulation, and event handling will be explored. Pre-requisites: JMA 472 or JMA 572 Lecture.

JMA 460 0 TO 3 cr.

This field study course is designed to take students to locations outside the University and practice the disciplines of Photography, Videography, Print and Broadcast Journalism. Students participate in daily workshops in the field and then apply their skills to individual projects proposed by them prior to departure. Through collaboration with faculty, students return from the field with materials they will develop for their work portfolios and demo reels. Field Work.

JMA 460P Field Production Prep 0 cr.

Preparation for the Field Production class. Held in summer.This is a 0 credit course in preparation for the trip cross country. Lecture.

JMA 462 Web Interface Design II 3 cr.

This course explores advanced issues in web interface design while developing professional application interfaces that are usable. Students examine key interface design issues and design/development methodologies in the field of interaction and web design. The class enables students to study and practice advanced design techniques for the web as well as to explore interface design patterns. Web application development technologies and practices will be covered as will web-standards compliance, accessibility, analytics, and usability. Lecture.

JMA 463 Advanced 3D Modeling 3 cr.

Students utilize Sub-D based 3D modeling software to create, texturize, light and render complex organic and inorganic objects. In 3D, students will create models of characters, vehicular, environmental and hard-edge surfaces. Advanced photorealistic rendering using global illumination techniques will add realism to the models. Lecture.

JMA 464 Interaction Design 3 cr.

In this introductory course, students examine theories, tools, and methods that can lead to the design of better interactive products. Students develop interfaces and corresponding interactions for a variety of devices. They then evaluate the effectiveness of their design by making empirical measurements using quantifiable usability criteria and a variety of measurement tools. Lecture.

JMA 465W Media Ethics 3 cr.

Examines ethical issues that challenge media professionals and consumers. By interpreting and applying ethical theory-from the classicists to the contemporary-students will analyze ethical challenges inherent in the modern media. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

JMA 466W Public Relations Writing 3 cr.

PR Writing will instruct students in the skill and art of writing well in a business setting. Students will learn to write concisely, logically, and persuasively. As such, they will learn to structure their writing to attract and maintain the reader's attention. The overall objective of the course is to enable students to craft clear, concise, and compelling, persuasive pieces that can be used in multiple PR situations from public interest communication to media relations. Pre-req: JMA 243; JMA 271W or permission of instructor. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

JMA 467 Media Research Methods 3 cr.

This course provides training in gathering and analyzing data and designing research projects relevant to media industries and phenomena. Lecture.

JMA 468 Media Management 3 cr.

This course introduces students to the basic management operations of contemporary media facilities and the economic parameters of US media industries. Lecture.

JMA 469W Magazine Journalism 3 cr.

Magazine Journalism: In this writing-intensive course, students will learn how to produce nonfiction articles such as profiles, trend stories and columns, for print and online magazines. Lectures will focus on sourcing, interviewing and narrative style, as well as on the diverse roles and functions of magazines. Students will learn how to freelance and will submit stories to both collegiate and commercial publications. Prerequisites: MA 271w (News Writing) and JMA 371-w (News Writing 2). Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

JMA 471 Investigative Reporting 3 cr.

Teaches interpretive reporting of urban affairs in a lecture-laboratory course. Pre-requisite: JMA 271W and JMA 371W. Lecture.

JMA 472 JavaScript 3 cr.

Students use the JavaScript language as an introductory programming course. The course introduces fundamental programming concepts: variables, calculations, functions, looping, decisions , validation, and processing of web-based forms. Students then explore the Document Object Model of web browsers to control elements of web pages. Lecture.

JMA 473 Media Law and Regulation 3 cr.

At the end of the course, each of you should have: 1. Basic knowledge of applicable legal terminology and the fundamental laws, regulations, and policy affecting and concerning media. 2. A general understanding and deeper appreciation of the ways that laws, regulations, and policies are developed and implemented in the US. This appreciation includes the ability to rationally argue in favor of or in opposition to specific cases and situations. 3. The ability to practically apply basic legal knowledge. Lecture.

JMA 475 Database for Web Development 3 cr.

Emphasis in this course is on database theory, with application to web sites. Students study how a web page can rely upon a database to store and retrieve data, which in turn produces dynamic content. Students will build a website which uses embedded SQL to add, edit, and delete content from a site. This course covers database design theory, basic queries, joins, and implementation of these elements in a server side scripting language. Lecture.

JMA 480 Independent Study 1 TO 9 cr.

This course provides an opportunity to study, indepth, a subject matter that is not taught in another class. You must have a project, a mentor, and must fill out an independent study contract prior to registering. You will be required to meet regularly with your mentor, and provide periodic progress reports and time sheets. Independent Study.

JMA 481 Mashups, RIA & Web 2.0 3 cr.

This course discusses the use of web service APIs and Rich Internet Application platforms and libraries such as Flex, Air and JQuery to build next-generation web pages. Topics such as Twitter, Google Maps, Flickr and AJAX will be explored. The students will build pages aggregating information from various web services and explore new mashup techniques. Prerequisite: JMA 472 Lecture.

JMA 482 Practicum: College Radio 1 TO 3 cr.

Students perform various management functions for WDSR (Duquesne Student Radio) and related campus media. This may include, but is not limited to, promotion and marketing, music and programming, and news and sports. Practicum.

JMA 483 Practicum:Journalism 1 TO 3 cr.

Students produce, copy and critique the Duquesne Duke or other college media. Practicum.

JMA 485 Special Topics 3 cr.

These courses cover new and noteworthy topics of interest. Check semester offerings for special classes offered. Lecture.

JMA 487 Essentials of Business and Financial Media 3 cr.

Equips student with the knowledge of the global economy and financial markets needed to communicate clearly and effectively as a journalist, public relations professional or corporate spokesperson. Using blogs, new stories and other forms of communication, students will write about the economy's impact on the world around them, analyze financial statements, profile executives and corporate strategy, and interpret the performance of Wall Street. Includes a simulated investment project that teaches the fundamentals of investing. Pre-requisites: JMA 271W and JMA 371W Lecture.

JMA 489 Advanced Digital Video Production 3 cr.

This course provides advanced instruction in the production and applications of digital video. The course covers advanced concepts and techniques in video design and production, from the initial preproduction scripts and the storyboards through actual shooting to nonlinear editing, mastering and output. The emphasis is on in-depth, advanced, practical experience in producing professional-level video products for a variety of applications, including education, corporate, documentary and entertainment. Lecture.

JMA 490 Documentary Production 3 cr.

This documentary video production course emphasizes nonfiction field production. The workshop combines theory, history and practice. Hands-on demonstrations, screenings, readings lecture, and discussion prepare students to produce a documentary video production. Students gain production experience working individually and in groups. Classes include an emphasis on research, pre-planning and writing skills as integral components of video production. Lecture.

JMA 491 Media Information and Technology 3 cr.

An advanced examination of the societal impact and the political economy of information and technological diffusion. Students will explore a relevant topic in-depth through classroom presentation(s) and the completion of a seminar paper. Examiniations at the discretion of instructor. Lecture.

JMA 492 Electronic Commerce Development 3 cr.

Students apply database design and development concepts and web design knowledge to create E-Commerce web sites. Various on-line payment strategies, secure site creation and shopping cart pages are discussed and implemented. Prerequisite: JMA 475. Lecture.

JMA 494 Media in American History 3 cr.

This course will cover the development, role and ramifications of the American Media from its Enlightenment roots until roughly the 1970's. The course focuses on a wide variety of mediums, the technologies that made them possible, the social forces that made them popular, the key figures who drove them and the historical context in which they operated. Lecture.

JMA 495 Server Scripting with PHP and MySQL 3 cr.

Students focus on the development of dynamic websites using PHP and MySQL. Students will build sites with database connectivity providing data storage and content management functionality. Explores database driven pages, validation, file storage, and other server-side scenarios. Prereq: JMA 475. Lecture.

JMA 496 Directed Readings 1 TO 6 cr.

Offers the opportunity for students and faculty to conduct in-depth study of a topic not covered, or covered only briefly, in other departmental courses. In order to enroll in Directed Readings, students must first secure approval from the faculty member best qualified to guide their study. Readings.

JMA 497 Special Projects 1 TO 6 cr.

Offers the opportunity for students to prepare print or electronic products (e.g., brochures, slide shows, video programs, etc.) commissioned by University or community organizations. Independent Study.

JMA 498 Web Server Management 3 cr.

Web server configuration will be explored as students work to build a server platform. Students will explore networking concepts, installation and administration of a web server operating system, configuration of services such as WWW and FTP, configure database and media streaming platforms, manage MIME types, and explore other topics like domain registration and the configuration of CMS packages. Laboratory.

LATN 101 Basic Latin I 4 cr.

The fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax with exercises in translation. Lecture.

LATN 102 Basic Latin II 4 cr.

The fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax with exercises in translation. Lecture.

LATN 201 Introduction Latin Readings I 3 cr.

Selections from major Latin authors. Readings.

LATN 202 Introduction Latin Readings II 3 cr.

Selections from major Latin authors. Readings.

LATN 305 Roman Republic: (Variable) 3 cr.

Plautus, Terence, Cicero, Lucretius, Catullus, Caesar and Sallust. Lecture.

LATN 306 Augustan Literature (Variable) 3 cr.

Livy, Vergil, Horace, Ovid, Propertius and Tibullus. Lecture.

LATN 307 Imperial Literature (Variable) 3 cr.

Seneca, Lucan, Petronius, Martial, Tacitus, Juvenal, Pliny the Younger, Suetonius and Lucian. Lecture.

LATN 308 Post Classical Literature (Variable) 3 cr.

Post classical, medieval, renaissance and neo-Latin authors. Lecture.

LATN 309 Studies in Genre - (Variable) 3 cr.

Selected genre of Latin literature. Lecture.

LATN 310 Lucretius 3 cr.

Readings in the Latin text of De Rerum Natura with lectures on the history of Roman Epicureanism. Readings.

LATN 311 Cicero 3 cr.

Readings in the speeches or philosophical works of Cicero. Lecture.

LATN 312 Medieval Literature 3 cr.

Selections of poetry and prose from medieval authors. Lecture.

LATN 313 Roman Drama 3 cr.

Readings in Plautus, Terence and Seneca, with background on the history of theater in Rome. Readings.

LATN 314 Latin Historiography 3 cr.

Readings from Latin historical authors, such as Caesar, Sallust, Livy, Suetonius, and Tacitus. Readings.

LATN 315 Ovid 3 cr.

A reading of selections from the epic and elegiac poetry of Ovid with attention to his literary innovations. Readings.

LATN 400 Independent Reading and Research-Latin 3 cr.

Provides an opportunity to do independent reading and research under the supervision of a faculty member with approval of the Chairman. Independent Study.

LTEC 201W Early Childhood Education - Theories and Practices 2 cr.

This course provides an overview of early childhood education and explores developmentally appropriate methods to nurture and challenge the whole child. A variety of historical approaches to early education will be explored as well as the ways in which such theoretical models are being applied to current practice. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

LTEC 202 Child Development - Birth to Age 5 3 cr.

In-depth examination of the developmental patterns of change in physical, cognitive, and psychosocial areas that have been identified for each stage of development of the child, from birth through five years of age. Emphasis is given to application of theoretical principles as well as techniques for observing and assessing growth and development. Lecture.

LTEC 203 Integrated Curriculum in Early Childhood Settings 3 cr.

Candidates will explore effective and appropriate planned and spontaneous experiences that are meaningful and challenging in learning environments. These experiences will encourage children's physical, cognitive, language, socio emotional, and aesthetic development through play-based experiences. Candidates will observe and interact with children presenting a variety of developmental levels and needs in a supervised practicum experience. Lecture.

LTEC 291 Field Experience-Level II 0 cr.

The candidates are placed in an early childhood setting to have an opportunity to observe child development and curriculum implementation based on the center philosophy. All of the sites are NAEYC accredited and/or participators in the PA Keystone Stars program. As a result of this field experience the candidates will be able to connect course content to real life experiences in the classroom as well as become more knowledgeable about effective early childhood practices. Field Work.

LTEC 304 Family, School and Community 3 cr.

In-depth examination of the complex characteristics of children's families and communities in order to create and sustain respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families. Lecture.

LTEC 305 Integrating Arts and Movement 3 cr.

The arts and movement occupy a significant place in curriculum for young children. This course enables candidates to understand the necessity of arts and movement in a child's overall development. Candidates learn educational content and methodology in creative arts and movement, and plan, implement, and evaluate developmentally appropriate experiences in the arts and movement for children ages birth through eight. Candidates are assisted in understanding appropriate dispositions related to the arts and movement in PreK-4th grade classrooms. Lecture.

LTEC 311W Content Knowledge for Developing Literacy 4 cr.

In the Literacy focused semester, teacher candidates compare local instructional practices in literacy with regional and national initiatives, and teach individuals, small groups, or whole classes. The focus is on instructional planning, instructional practice, and formative evaluation. The course integrates knowledge, skills, dispositions, and field experiences appropriate to PreK-4 learnings in the area of Literacy. The course is framed by State and national professional standards, the themes and domains of the Leading Teacher Program and the particular expertise of the faculty. Content includes the acquisition and development of speech cross referenced to idiolects and social dialects. Children's writing is examined from pre writing to the production of confident short prose pieces at the fourth grade level. Reading is integrated with writing from the reading readiness stage through independent reading of children's literature. The Literacy semester merges the areas of reading instruction, language arts education, and children's literature. Teacher candidates participate in three instructional modules and are assigned to a local school to do field work focusing on literacy. Writing is used extensively to enhance learning and, therefore, quality of writing is assessed throughout the course. Candidates commit to one day a week in a school setting to learn effective pedagogy from veteran teachers, and examine informal and formal methods of assessment of student progress in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and visualizing. Candidates are mentored to reflect and document their dispositions and personal formation across theories, practices, and action research in teaching and learning. Module 1 focuses on student learning outcomes and the knowledge base that leading teachers must have in order to facilitate student learning. Module 2 is delivered in school settings, or in similar organizations, such as local literacy support agencies, the School of Education Reading Clinic, and the Saturday tutorial services offered through the University Learning Skills Center for urban students. In this module, teacher candidates compare local instructional practices in literacy with regional and national initiatives, and teach individuals, small groups, or whole classes. The focus is on instructional planning and practice, and formative evaluation. Module 3 addresses the service of reading, language arts and related literature to all aspects of pre-school and elementary education including the relationship of literacy to other areas of the school curriculum. Thematic instruction, projects, and interdisciplinary activities are referenced to scholarly research. Teacher candidates will be linked through technology to regional, national and international schools and to expert practitioners found in local school districts. Integrated into the semester, teacher candidates focus on adaptations for students with learning differences in literacy assessment, curriculum, and instructional strategies. Lecture.

LTEC 312W Pedagogy for Literacy Grades PreK-4 4 cr.

In the Literacy focused semester, teacher candidates compare local instructional practices in literacy with regional and national initiatives, and teach individuals, small groups, or whole classes. The focus is on instructional planning, instructional practice, and formative evaluation. The course integrates knowledge, skills, dispositions, and field experiences appropriate to PreK-4 learnings in the area of Literacy. The course is framed by State and national professional standards, the themes and domains of the Leading Teacher Program and the particular expertise of the faculty. Content includes the acquisition and development of speech cross referenced to idiolects and social dialects. Children's writing is examined from pre writing to the production of confident short prose pieces at the fourth grade level. Reading is integrated with writing from the reading readiness stage through independent reading of children's literature. The Literacy semester merges the areas of reading instruction, language arts education, and children's literature. Teacher candidates participate in three instructional modules and are assigned to a local school to do field work focusing on literacy. Writing is used extensively to enhance learning and, therefore, quality of writing is assessed throughout the course. Candidates commit to one day a week in a school setting to learn effective pedagogy from veteran teachers, and examine informal and formal methods of assessment of student progress in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and visualizing. Candidates are mentored to reflect and document their dispositions and personal formation across theories, practices, and action research in teaching and learning. Module 1 focuses on student learning outcomes and the knowledge base that leading teachers must have in order to facilitate student learning. Module 2 is delivered in school settings, or in similar organizations, such as local literacy support agencies, the School of Education Reading Clinic, and the Saturday tutorial services offered through the University Learning Skills Center for urban students. In this module, teacher candidates compare local instructional practices in literacy with regional and national initiatives, and teach individuals, small groups, or whole classes. The focus is on instructional planning and practice, and formative evaluation. Module 3 addresses the service of reading, language arts and related literature to all aspects of pre-school and elementary education including the relationship of literacy to other areas of the school curriculum. Thematic instruction, projects, and interdisciplinary activities are referenced to scholarly research. Teacher candidates will be linked through technology to regional, national and international schools and to expert practitioners found in local school districts. Integrated into the semester, teacher candidates focus on adaptations for students with learning differences in literacy assessment, curriculum, and instructional strategies. Lecture.

LTEC 313 Literacy Field Experience Level 3 1 cr.

In the Literacy focused semester, teacher candidates compare local instructional practices in literacy with regional and national initiatives, and teach individuals, small groups, or whole classes. The focus is on instructional planning, instructional practice, and formative evaluation. The course integrates knowledge, skills, dispositions, and field experiences appropriate to PreK-4 learnings in the area of Literacy. The course is framed by State and national professional standards, the themes and domains of the Leading Teacher Program and the particular expertise of the faculty. Content includes the acquisition and development of speech cross referenced to idiolects and social dialects. Children's writing is examined from pre writing to the production of confident short prose pieces at the fourth grade level. Reading is integrated with writing from the reading readiness stage through independent reading of children's literature. The Literacy semester merges the areas of reading instruction, language arts education, and children's literature. Teacher candidates participate in three instructional modules and are assigned to a local school to do field work focusing on literacy. Writing is used extensively to enhance learning and, therefore, quality of writing is assessed throughout the course. Candidates commit to one day a week in a school setting to learn effective pedagogy from veteran teachers, and examine informal and formal methods of assessment of student progress in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and visualizing. Candidates are mentored to reflect and document their dispositions and personal formation across theories, practices, and action research in teaching and learning. Module 1 focuses on student learning outcomes and the knowledge base that leading teachers must have in order to facilitate student learning. Module 2 is delivered in school settings, or in similar organizations, such as local literacy support agencies, the School of Education Reading Clinic, and the Saturday tutorial services offered through the University Learning Skills Center for urban students. In this module, teacher candidates compare local instructional practices in literacy with regional and national initiatives, and teach individuals, small groups, or whole classes. The focus is on instructional planning and practice, and formative evaluation. Module 3 addresses the service of reading, language arts and related literature to all aspects of pre-school and elementary education including the relationship of literacy to other areas of the school curriculum. Thematic instruction, projects, and interdisciplinary activities are referenced to scholarly research. Teacher candidates will be linked through technology to regional, national and international schools and to expert practitioners found in local school districts. Integrated into the semester, teacher candidates focus on adaptations for students with learning differences in literacy assessment, curriculum, and instructional strategies. Field Work.

LTEC 321 Content Knowledge for Teaching Numeracy 4 cr.

The Numeracy focused semester consists of three major components that are integrated and focus on the teaching and learning of mathematics in elementary grades and on the development of mathematical thinking. Knowing Mathematics and School Mathematics Teacher candidates develop knowledge of the content and discourse of N-6 mathematics, including: • mathematical concepts and procedures and the connections among them; • multiple representations of mathematical concepts and procedures; • ways to reason mathematically, solve problems, and communicate mathematics effectively at different levels of formality; Knowing Students as Learners of Mathematics Teacher candidates develop knowledge of • research on how children learn mathematics; • the effects of children's age, abilities, interests, and experience on learning mathematics; • the influences of linguistic, ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic backgrounds and gender on learning mathematics; • ways to affirm and support full participation and continued study of mathematics by all children. Knowing Mathematical Pedagogy Teacher candidates develop knowledge of and ability to use • instructional materials and resources; • ways to represent mathematics concepts and procedures; • instructional strategies and classroom organizational models; • ways to promote discourse and foster a sense of mathematical community; • means for assessing student understanding of mathematics. Teacher candidates apply knowledge of mathematics, school mathematics, children's learning in mathematics, and mathematical pedagogy in an elementary school setting. Integrated into the semester, teacher candidates focus on adaptations in numeracy assessment, curriculum, and instructional strategies for students with learning differences. Lecture.

LTEC 322 Pedagogy for Numeracy: PK-Gr.4 4 cr.

The Numeracy focused semester consists of three major components that are integrated and focus on the teaching and learning of mathematics in elementary grades and on the development of mathematical thinking. Knowing Mathematics and School Mathematics Teacher candidates develop knowledge of the content and discourse of N-6 mathematics, including: • mathematical concepts and procedures and the connections among them; • multiple representations of mathematical concepts and procedures; • ways to reason mathematically, solve problems, and communicate mathematics effectively at different levels of formality; Knowing Students as Learners of Mathematics Teacher candidates develop knowledge of • research on how children learn mathematics; • the effects of children's age, abilities, interests, and experience on learning mathematics; • the influences of linguistic, ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic backgrounds and gender on learning mathematics; • ways to affirm and support full participation and continued study of mathematics by all children. Knowing Mathematical Pedagogy Teacher candidates develop knowledge of and ability to use • instructional materials and resources; • ways to represent mathematics concepts and procedures; • instructional strategies and classroom organizational models; • ways to promote discourse and foster a sense of mathematical community; • means for assessing student understanding of mathematics. Teacher candidates apply knowledge of mathematics, school mathematics, children's learning in mathematics, and mathematical pedagogy in an elementary school setting. Integrated into the semester, teacher candidates focus on adaptations in numeracy assessment, curriculum, and instructional strategies for students with learning differences. Lecture.

LTEC 323 Numeracy Field Experience - Level 3 1 cr.

The Numeracy focused semester consists of three major components that are integrated and focus on the teaching and learning of mathematics in elementary grades and on the development of mathematical thinking. Knowing Mathematics and School Mathematics Teacher candidates develop knowledge of the content and discourse of N-6 mathematics, including: • mathematical concepts and procedures and the connections among them; • multiple representations of mathematical concepts and procedures; • ways to reason mathematically, solve problems, and communicate mathematics effectively at different levels of formality; Knowing Students as Learners of Mathematics Teacher candidates develop knowledge of • research on how children learn mathematics; • the effects of children's age, abilities, interests, and experience on learning mathematics; • the influences of linguistic, ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic backgrounds and gender on learning mathematics; • ways to affirm and support full participation and continued study of mathematics by all children. Knowing Mathematical Pedagogy Teacher candidates develop knowledge of and ability to use • instructional materials and resources; • ways to represent mathematics concepts and procedures; • instructional strategies and classroom organizational models; • ways to promote discourse and foster a sense of mathematical community; • means for assessing student understanding of mathematics. Teacher candidates apply knowledge of mathematics, school mathematics, children's learning in mathematics, and mathematical pedagogy in an elementary school setting. Integrated into the semester, teacher candidates focus on adaptations in numeracy assessment, curriculum, and instructional strategies for students with learning differences. Field Work.

LTEC 331 Content Knowledge: Science and Social Studies 4 cr.

The Science/Social Studies semester will focus on educational studies and experiences integrating science and social studies in grades PreK-4 and their impact on individuals and communities. The integration of the content areas occurs through the understanding, development, and application of skills necessary for inquiry. Teacher candidates will engage in an investigation with emphasis on integrated content. Teacher candidates will demonstrate the application of inquiry skills, planning and implementation of integrated investigations, and classroom teaching skills in schools, museums, and other educational facilities. Teacher candidates focus on adaptations in science and social studies specifically in assessment, curriculum, and instructional strategies for students with learning differences. Lecture.

LTEC 332 Pedagogy: Science and Social Studies PK-Grade 4 4 cr.

The Science/Social Studies semester will focus on educational studies and experiences integrating science and social studies in grades PreK-4 and their impact on individuals and communities. The integration of the content areas occurs through the understanding, development, and application of skills necessary for inquiry. Teacher candidates will engage in an investigation with emphasis on integrated content. Teacher candidates will demonstrate the application of inquiry skills, planning and implementation of integrated investigations, and classroom teaching skills in schools, museums, and other educational facilities. Teacher candidates focus on adaptations in science and social studies specifically in assessment, curriculum, and instructional strategies for students with learning differences. Lecture.

LTEC 333 Science and Social Studies Field Experience – Level 3 1 cr.

The Science/Social Studies semester will focus on educational studies and experiences integrating science and social studies in grades PreK-4 and their impact on individuals and communities. The integration of the content areas occurs through the understanding, development, and application of skills necessary for inquiry. Teacher candidates will engage in an investigation with emphasis on integrated content. Teacher candidates will demonstrate the application of inquiry skills, planning and implementation of integrated investigations, and classroom teaching skills in schools, museums, and other educational facilities. Teacher candidates focus on adaptations in science and social studies specifically in assessment, curriculum, and instructional strategies for students with learning differences. Field Work.

LTEC 401 Family and Community Collaboration 2 cr.

Candidates explore how to establish reciprocal relationships with families and how to effectively utilize their knowledge of community and its resources to meet the needs of the families represented in their classroom. This course is offered in conjunction with the student teaching experience and utilizes the assigned placement to implement the given strategies. Lecture.

LTEC 490 Pre Kindergarten-4 Independent Study 1 TO 3 cr.

LTEC 492 Student Teaching Grades Pre-Kindergarten through 4 12 cr.

Student teaching for Grades PreK-4 certification required a split placement in Early Childhood and Elementary. Student teaching is shared between a NAEYC accredited early childhood classroom or setting, and an elementary classroom under the direct supervision of a cooperating teacher and a University supervisor. Student Teaching.

LTEC 493 Student Teaching PreK-4 Abroad 6 cr.

Students who plan to student teach may fulfill part of their student teaching requirement by student teaching for 10 weeks abroad. Student Teaching.

LTEL 201 Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners 3 cr.

English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction aims to provide English Language Learner (ELLs) with social, cultural and basic and academic language skills to improve their academic achievement. Granted that the developmental goals of ELL's language and academic skills are inseparably interdependent, ESL instruction cannot be perceived as the sole responsibility of ESL specialists. This course aims to support pre-service content area teachers in developing adequate level of competency in addressing the special needs of linguistically and culturally diverse learners in their classes. It also prepares pre-service content area teachers to work with ESL professionals on various levels. The course provides them with basic knowledge and skills appropriate and effective instructional experience for the ELL population. It also focuses on how content area teachers can make accommodations, adaptations and modifications in their instructional planning and implementation to create an inclusive instructional environment for all learners. In light of PDE requirements, the course covers content related to the five TESOL standards, including language, culture, instructiona, assessment, and professionalism. Lecture.

LTET 101 Instructional Technology I 1 cr.

Introduces teacher candidates to the skills required for modeling and demonstrating technologies for the classroom. Competencies center on the use of technology to communicate and interact with peers and colleagues and include an orientation to personal computers and the campus network, electronic mail, word processing, graphics presentation, and the uses of the Internet for exploration and research. Other.

LTET 102 Instructional Technology II 1 cr.

Provides teacher candidates with a set of tools required to integrate technology into the curriculum. Advanced features of word processing, graphics presentation and the Internet are presented. In addition, online lesson plans, content-rich images, and related digitized resource materials are harvested from the World Wide Web and incorporated into classroom-ready instructional materials. Other.

LTET 201 Integrated Technology for Middle Level Education 2 cr.

Candidates will learn how to evaluate existing middle level, discipline – specific software and how to monitor student achievement using spreadsheets. Candidates will create materials for middle level students that include assistive technology. The final products will be hyperbooks for middle level students to use and a portfolio based on the International Society for Technology Education's (ISTE) standards for teacher development. The prerequisite for this course is the successful completion of the LTET 101 and LTET 102 courses. Lecture.

LTET 202 Middle Level Digital Media 2 cr.

Candidates use the ADDIE (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation) ISD (Instructional System Design) model to integrate technology into Math and Science learning environments. They will learn how to evaluate existing middle level, discipline-specific software and how to monitor student achievement using specific gradebook software. The candidates will create materials for middle level students that include assistive technology. The final product will be a portfolio. Other.

LTET 203 Instructional Technologies for Reading and Language Arts 3 cr.

Candidates will explore the Backward Design model to create technology rich curriculum for middle level use in Reading and Language Arts courses. The candidates will prepare lessons for face to face and for online modes. The candidates will create materials that include assistive technology. Use of web tools will be emphasized. Other.

LTET 315 Instructional Technology for Literacy 1 cr.

In the Literacy focused semester, teacher candidates compare local instructional practices in literacy with regional and national initiatives, and teach individuals, small groups, or whole classes. The focus is on instructional planning, instructional practice, and formative evaluation. The course integrates knowledge, skills, dispositions, and field experiences appropriate to PreK-4 learnings in the area of Literacy. The course is framed by State and national professional standards, the themes and domains of the Leading Teacher Program and the particular expertise of the faculty. Content includes the acquisition and development of speech cross referenced to idiolects and social dialects. Children's writing is examined from pre writing to the production of confident short prose pieces at the fourth grade level. Reading is integrated with writing from the reading readiness stage through independent reading of children's literature. The Literacy semester merges the areas of reading instruction, language arts education, and children's literature. Teacher candidates participate in three instructional modules and are assigned to a local school to do field work focusing on literacy. Writing is used extensively to enhance learning and, therefore, quality of writing is assessed throughout the course. Candidates commit to one day a week in a school setting to learn effective pedagogy from veteran teachers, and examine informal and formal methods of assessment of student progress in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and visualizing. Candidates are mentored to reflect and document their dispositions and personal formation across theories, practices, and action research in teaching and learning. Module 1 focuses on student learning outcomes and the knowledge base that leading teachers must have in order to facilitate student learning. Module 2 is delivered in school settings, or in similar organizations, such as local literacy support agencies, the School of Education Reading Clinic, and the Saturday tutorial services offered through the University Learning Skills Center for urban students. In this module, teacher candidates compare local instructional practices in literacy with regional and national initiatives, and teach individuals, small groups, or whole classes. The focus is on instructional planning and practice, and formative evaluation. Module 3 addresses the service of reading, language arts and related literature to all aspects of pre-school and elementary education including the relationship of literacy to other areas of the school curriculum. Thematic instruction, projects, and interdisciplinary activities are referenced to scholarly research. Teacher candidates will be linked through technology to regional, national and international schools and to expert practitioners found in local school districts. Integrated into the semester, teacher candidates focus on adaptations for students with learning differences in literacy assessment, curriculum, and instructional strategies. Lecture.

LTET 325 Instructional Technology for Numeracy 1 cr.

The Numeracy focused semester consists of three major components that are integrated and focus on the teaching and learning of mathematics in elementary grades and on the development of mathematical thinking. Knowing Mathematics and School Mathematics Teacher candidates develop knowledge of the content and discourse of N-6 mathematics, including: • mathematical concepts and procedures and the connections among them; • multiple representations of mathematical concepts and procedures; • ways to reason mathematically, solve problems, and communicate mathematics effectively at different levels of formality; Knowing Students as Learners of Mathematics Teacher candidates develop knowledge of • research on how children learn mathematics; • the effects of children's age, abilities, interests, and experience on learning mathematics; • the influences of linguistic, ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic backgrounds and gender on learning mathematics; • ways to affirm and support full participation and continued study of mathematics by all children. Knowing Mathematical Pedagogy Teacher candidates develop knowledge of and ability to use • instructional materials and resources; • ways to represent mathematics concepts and procedures; • instructional strategies and classroom organizational models; • ways to promote discourse and foster a sense of mathematical community; • means for assessing student understanding of mathematics. Teacher candidates apply knowledge of mathematics, school mathematics, children's learning in mathematics, and mathematical pedagogy in an elementary school setting. Integrated into the semester, teacher candidates focus on adaptations in numeracy assessment, curriculum, and instructional strategies for students with learning differences. Lecture.

LTET 335 Instructional Technology for Science and Social Studies 1 cr.

The Science/Social Studies semester will focus on educational studies and experiences integrating science and social studies in grades PreK-4 and their impact on individuals and communities. The integration of the content areas occurs through the understanding, development, and application of skills necessary for inquiry. Teacher candidates will engage in an investigation with emphasis on integrated content. Teacher candidates will demonstrate the application of inquiry skills, planning and implementation of integrated investigations, and classroom teaching skills in schools, museums, and other educational facilities. Teacher candidates focus on adaptations in science and social studies specifically in assessment, curriculum, and instructional strategies for students with learning differences. Lecture.

LTFL 101 Introduction to the Teaching Profession 2 cr.

Orients aspiring teachers to the key structures, concepts, processes, and learning opportunities of the Leading Teacher Program. Provides a broad introductory overview of the teaching profession, including both issues that are internal to schools and those relating to schools' surrounding communities. Lecture.

LTFL 102 Ethics, Education, and the Teaching Profession 3 cr.

Introduces the theory and practice of ethics, focusing on applications in education and especially in the profession of teaching. Students will learn about ethics, will practice using "moral languages," and will examine moral issues using case studies drawn from teaching practices and the profession. LTFL 102 has been approved by the UCOR committee for fulfilling the ethics requirement of the university core; it is required of all education majors. Lecture.

LTFL 181 Cohort Experience 0 cr.

LTFL 181, 182, 281, 282 Cohort Experience 0 cr. Teacher candidates will participate in regularly scheduled cohort meetings. The cohort experience provides opportunities for communication and mentoring with faculty and fellow students. Activities are designed to facilitate reflection on personal and interpersonal development and progress through the Leading Teacher Program. Seminar.

LTFL 182 Cohort Experience 0 cr.

Teacher candidates will participate in regularly scheduled cohort meetings. The cohort experience provides opportunities for communication and mentoring with faculty and fellow students. Activities are designed to facilitate reflection on personal and interpersonal development and progress through the Leading Teacher Program. Seminar.

LTFL 192 Field Experience Level I 0 cr.

The Leading Teacher Program includes broad and diversified professional field experiences designed to provide opportunities for observing and working with children and youth, beginning the second semester of full-time study. The settings for these experiences include public and private schools, and education agencies, institutions and organizations. Experiences are provided in urban, suburban, and rural settings. All of these experiences are completed under professional supervision from the University and from the off-campus educational organization. Teacher candidates will participate in a range of settings throughout the course of their program. Field Work.

LTFL 201W Educational Pscyhology I: Learning Development and Motivation 3 cr.

Provides opportunities to reveal and examine assumptions underlying the teaching-learning process. Key theoretical principles in human development, learning, and motivation are studied in an effort to evaluate theory for its relevance to, and operation in, classroom practice. Writing is used extensively to enhance learning and, therefore, quality of writing is assessed throughout the course. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

LTFL 202W Educational Pscyhology II: Classroom Leadership, Assessment, and Evaluation 3 cr.

This course is a continuation of the learning opportunities from LTEF 201W. The assumptions underlying the teaching-learning process remain a focus of study. Key theoretical principles in classroom leadership, assessment, and evaluation are examined to determine how relevant theory operates in effective practice. Writing is used extensively to enhance learning and, therefore, quality of writing is assessed throughout the course. (LTEF 201W is a prerequisite for LTEF 202W.) Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

LTFL 204 Social Justice in Educational Settings 3 cr.

This course will focus on the role of social justice in educating a diverse student population. Social justice discourse is introduced as an educational tool that can be used to better understand the correlations between organizational, institutional, and/or social conditions and the widespread inequities in areas of, but not limited to, race, culture, class, and gender that challenge the educational system. This course is required of all education majors. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

LTFL 206 Educational Psychology I: Child and Adolescent Development 3 cr.

This course focuses on major theories and research on the unique developmental characteristics of children and adolescents as they relate to educational practices. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the implications of development for helping all children succeed in developmentally responsive educational environments. Lecture.

LTFL 207W Educational Psychology II: Learning, Motivation, and Classroom Management 3 cr.

This course will focus on classroom applications of key theoretical principles of learning, motivation, and creating engaging learning environments for children and adolescents. Emphasis will be placed on examination of beliefs about the teaching-learning process and use of theory and research to make effective decisions of teaching practice within developmentally-responsive classroom environments. Writing is used extensively to enhance learning and, therefore, quality of writing is assessed throughout the course. Lecture.

LTFL 211 Educational Psychology I: Child Development 3 cr.

Focuses on major theories and research on the unique developmental characteristics of children as they relate to educational practices at the elementary level. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the implications of children's physical, cognitive, socio-emotional, and moral development. Consideration will be given to the cultural contexts in which children live with a particular focus on family, peers, schools and the larger cultural context. Lecture.

LTFL 212W Educational Psychology II: Motivating Learning in PreK and Elementary Classrooms 3 cr.

Focuses on the use of key theoretical principles of learning and motivation to create motivating learning environments for students in early childhood/elementary level classrooms. Emphasis will be placed on examination of beliefs about the teaching-learning process and use of theory and research to make effective decisions of teaching practice within developmentally-responsive classrooms. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

LTFL 215 Fundamentals of Assessment Grades PK-4 3 cr.

Covers foundations of assessing student learning with special emphasis on developmentally appropriate assessment of young children's learning through informal and formal observation. Topics also include reliability and validity, teacher made tests, diagnostic, screening, achievement and other standardized tests, goals, objectives, targets and standards, ethics and legal issues, objective, subjective, performance and authentic approaches to assessment. Lecture.

LTFL 221 Educational Psychology I: Early Adolescent Development 3 cr.

Focuses on major theories and research on the unique developmental characteristics of young adolescents as they relate to educational practices at the middle level. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the implications of early adolescent development for helping all children succeed in developmentally responsive educational environments. Lecture.

LTFL 222W Educational Psychology II: Motivating Learning in Middle Level Classrooms 3 cr.

Focuses on key theoretical principles of learning, motivation, and creating engaging learning environments for young adolescents in middle level classrooms. Emphasis will be placed on examination of beliefs about the teaching-learning process and use of theory and research to make effective decisions of teaching practice within developmentally-responsive classroom environments. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

LTFL 225 Fundamentals of Assessment in Middle Grades 3 cr.

Covers foundations of assessing student learning in middle grades. Focuses on understanding topics in measurement and assessment including reliability and validity, teacher made tests, diagnostic, screening, achievement and other standardized tests, goals, objectives, targets and standards, ethics and legal issues, objective, subjective, performance and authentic approaches to assessment. Lecture.

LTFL 281 Cohort Experience 0 cr.

Teacher candidates will participate in regularly scheduled cohort meetings. The cohort experience provides opportunities for communication and mentoring with faculty and fellow students. Activities are designed to facilitate reflection on personal and interpersonal development and progress through the Leading Teacher Program. Field Work.

LTFL 282 Cohort Experience 0 cr.

Teacher candidates will participate in regularly scheduled cohort meetings. The cohort experience provides opportunities for communication and mentoring with faculty and fellow students. Activities are designed to facilitate reflection on personal and interpersonal development and progress through the Leading Teacher Program. Seminar.

LTFL 291 Field Experience Level II 0 cr.

The Leading Teacher Program includes broad and diversified professional field experiences designed to provide opportunities for observing and working with children and youth, beginning the second semester of full-time study. The settings for these experiences include public and private schools, and education agencies, institutions and organizations. Experiences are provided in urban, suburban, and rural settings. All of these experiences are completed under professional supervision from the University and from the off-campus educational organization. Teacher candidates will participate in a range of settings throughout the course of their program. Field Work.

LTFL 292 Field Experience 0 cr.

The Leading Teacher Program includes broad and diversified professional field experiences designed to provide opportunities for observing and working with children and youth, beginning the second semester of full-time study. The settings for these experiences include public and private schools, and education agencies, institutions and organizations. Experiences are provided in urban, suburban, and rural settings. All of these experiences are completed under professional supervision from the University and from the off-campus educational organization. Teacher candidates will participate in a range of settings throughout the course of their program. Field Work.

LTFL 315 Assessment II: Design Implementation and Interpretation Pre K-4 3 cr.

Focuses on development and use of assessments of student learning in Pre-K and elementary classrooms with special focus on informal and formal observation. Topics include construction and use of teacher-made tests; descriptive statistics necessary for interpreting and using standardized tests of aptitude and achievement; procedures for determining and reporting grades and integrating assessment data into course design and implementation; and procedures for measuring and evaluating instructional effectiveness. Lecture.

LTFL 325 Assessment II: Formative Assessment Middle 1 cr.

Focuses on the development, use, and interpretation of formative assessment techniques. Also covers teacher-made formative assessments; descriptive statistics for interpreting formative assessments; integrating formative assessment in grades, course design and implementation; and procedures for measuring and evaluating instructional effectiveness with formative assessment data. Lecture.

LTFL 326 Design, Development, Implementation, and Interpretation of Summative Assessment Evidence: Grades 4-8 1 cr.

Focuses on development, use, and interpretation of summative assessment techniques in middle grades. Also covers teacher-made summative assessments, descriptive statistics necessary for interpreting and using summative assessments; integrating summative assessment in grades, course design and implementation; and measuring and evaluating instructional effectiveness with summative assessment data. Lecture.

LTFL 327 Standard Assessment in Middle Grades 1 cr.

Focuses on development, use, and interpretation of standardized assessment techniques in middle grades. Also covers standardized assessments of classroom learning for formative and summative purposes; descriptive statistics for interpreting and integrating these assessments in final evaluative grades if appropriate; integrating these assessment data into course design and implementation; and procedures for measuring and evaluating instructional effectiveness. Lecture.

LTFL 480 Independent Study: Adolescent Development 1 TO 3 cr.

For students in any program who wish to develop a project or investigate a problem through supervised research. Enrollment in appropriate area with consent of a full-time faculty member is required. Independent Study.

LTML 311W Teaching Language Arts in Grades 4-8 3 cr.

This course focuses on written and oral language development of children from middle childhood to early adolescence (grades 4-8). It explores the cognitive, social, cultural, and political implications of literacy education. Utilizing an intensive writing workshop format, sessions will be conducted to model a link between the reading and writing process. Lecture.

LTML 312 Language and Literacy Development in Grades 4-8 3 cr.

This course examines the psycholinguistics of reading; reading in social and cultural contexts in schools, families, communities, and workplaces; and the politics of reading with a focus on reading instruction for children from middle childhood to early adolescence (grades 4-8). The course provides strategies for teaching all children to read. Lecture.

LTML 312W Teaching Reading in Grades 4-8 3 cr.

The primary objective of this course is for teacher candidates in grades 4-8 to acheive a comprehensive understanding of the inter-relatedness of language and literacy learning and to apply this knowledge in the design and evaluation of effective literacy instruction in content areas. Knowledge of the interaction between language and literacy is based on exploration of the greater socio-political context of schooling that define the meaning of literacy in a linguistically and culturally diverse society. Specifically, this course will examine issues stemming from language diversity in the public schools including English literacy, native-language literacy and biliteracy and the impact of educational policies and programs on language minority students. Linguistic perspectives on language learning including spoken language, writing and learning to read will be explored for both L-1 and L-2 students. The relationship between language and literacy and characteristics of effective curriculum and instruction in content areas will be examined based on current educational research. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

LTML 313 Young Adolescent Literature 3 cr.

This course focuses on instructional strategies and curriculum development for teaching children's and young adult literature (grades 4-8). The course provides opportunities for sharing, discussing, and using literature (poetry, folk literature, fiction, and nonfiction) that is culturally informed, sensitive, and relevant to young adolescents' interests in and interpretations of literature. Lecture.

LTML 324 Teaching Science in Grades 4-8 3 cr.

This course is a study of the theories, practices, content, and resources for the teaching and learning of science in grades 4 through 8. A constructivist philosophy of teaching and learning is modeled through the organization of the learning environment to promote an inquiry approach to science education. Candidates in this course will develop their awareness of reform in science education at the national, state, and local levels and assess the subsequent impact and effects on teachers; examine their personal beliefs and attitudes toward science and the teaching and learning of science in order to develop and refine a personal philosophy of the teaching and learning of science; become teachers of science consistent with the standards as described in the National Science Education Standards. Prerequisites/Enrollment Limits: Students will have to be admitted to the Professional Educator Certification Track prior to being allowed to enroll in any 300 level courses in the Leading Teacher Program. Co-requisites for the course: LTML 315, 395; LTSP 301; LTFL 326 Lecture.

LTML 325 Teaching Social Studies in Grades 4-8 3 cr.

This course examines the theories, practices, content, and resources for the teaching and learning of social studies in grades 4 through 8. It encourages students to articulate and enact a set of ideas and practices for helping young people develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world. This is accomplished via curricular and pedagogical decision-making exercises addressing various geographical, social, political, and economic dimensions of global citizenship, with emphasis placed on how these dimensions can be framed and understood within the Spiritan Tradition of Caring. Prerequisites/Enrollment Limits: Students will have to be admitted to the Professional Educator Certification Track prior to being allowed to enroll in any 300 level courses in the Leading Teacher Program. Co-requisites for the course: LTML 314, 394, 395; LTSP 301; LTFL 326 Lecture.

LTML 391 English/Language Arts Field Experience Level 3 1 cr.

Candidates spend 50 hours in a school setting learning effective pedagogy from veteran teachers, and examining informal and formal methods of assessment of student progress in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and visualizing. Candidates are mentored to reflect and document their dispositions and personal formation across theories, practices, and action research in teaching and learning. Field Work.

LTML 394 Teaching Science in Grades 4-8 Field Experience-Science 1 cr.

This 25 hour field experience will provide an opportunity for teaching candidates to connect, apply, and reflect upon the ideas, strategies, and theories of effective teaching promoted in the Teaching Science in Grades 4-8 methods course to the practical setting of a school classroom. This experience is designed to foster personal and professional growth in preparation for student teaching and entry into the teaching profession. Prerequisites/Enrollment Limits: Students will have to be admitted to the Professional Educator Certification Track prior to being allowed to enroll in any 300 level courses in the Leading Teacher Program. Co-requisites for the course: LTML 324, 325; LTSP 301; LTFL 326 Field Work.

LTML 395 Teaching Social Studies in Grades 4-8 Field Experience: Social Studies 1 cr.

This 25 hour field experience will provide an opportunity for teaching candidates to connect, apply, and reflect upon the ideas, strategies, and theories of effective teaching promoted in the Teaching Social Studies in Grades 4-8 methods course to the practical setting of a school classroom. This experience is designed to foster personal and professional growth in preparation for student teaching and entry into the teaching profession. Prerequisites/Enrollment Limits: Students will have to be admitted to the Professional Educator Certification Track prior to being allowed to enroll in any 300 level courses in the Leading Teacher Program. Co-requisites for the course: LTML 314, 315, 394; LTSP 301; LTFL 326 Field Work.

LTML 410 Reading in the Content Area Grades 4-8 3 cr.

EDLS 301/LTML 410 Reading in the Content Areas encompasses teaching and learning strategies, classroom diversity, instructional scaffolding and assessment, learning with printed and electronic texts, and the development of skill sets related to writing, talking, and listening in classroom learning environments in grades 4-12. Prepares candidates to integrate knowledge of reading as it relates to content areas. Lecture.

LTML 410W Reading in Content Area Grades 4-8 3 cr.

Reading in the Content Areas encompasses teaching and learning strategies, classroom diversity, instructional scaffolding and assessment, learning with printed and electronic texts, and the development of skill sets related to writing, talking, and listening in classroom learning environments in grades 4-12. Prepares candidates to integrate knowledge of reading as it relates to content areas. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

LTML 411 Teaching Math in Grades 4-8 3 cr.

This course engages teaching candidates in developing the fundamental knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teaching middle-level mathematics (grades 4-8) in ways that promote students' learning and understanding. The course content addresses state and national standards for teaching and learning mathematics, lesson planning, instructional strategies, assessment techniques, the use of technology in mathematics education, and differentiating to meet the needs of diverse learners. Lecture.

LTML 412 Math Content Knowledge 3 cr.

This course engages teaching candidates in developing the fundamental knowledge for teaching middle-level mathematics (grades 4-8). The course addresses math content that teachers need to in order to teach math consistent with state and national standards. Lecture.

LTML 491 Field Experience Level 3 - Math and Reading 1 cr.

Teacher candidates demonstrate the application of planning and implementation of math and reading knowledge and skills in upper elementary classrooms. Field Work.

LTML 492 Student Teaching Grades 4-8 12 cr.

Student teaching is a fifteen week experience in an approved middle school under the direct supervision of a cooperating teacher and a University supervisor. Student Teaching.

LTML 493 Student Teaching Grades 4-8 Abroad 6 cr.

Students who plan to student teach may fulfill part of their student teaching requirement by student teaching for 10 weeks abroad. Student Teaching.

LTSP 201 Foundations of Inclusive Educational Practice 3 cr.

This course chronicles the historical and legal foundations of the field of special education with a focus on inclusive educational practice as it relates to the principle of least restrictive environment. The types and nature of disabilities from the perspective of normal growth and development and the impact on designing instruction for students with diverse learning needs will be examined. Topics include the referral and identification process, collaborative skills for decision-making and building partnerships, and developing instructional supports for students with diverse learning and behavior needs based on individualized assessments. Lecture.

LTSP 301 Exploring Inclusive Teaching Supports 3 cr.

This online course allows middle and secondary teacher candidates to explore methods and supports for delivery of instruction to students with high incidence disabilities. A foundation will be laid for acquiring the necessary background and skills in the process(es) of universal design, differentiated instruction, and co-teaching. Candidates will become familiar with adapting curriculum based on student learning needs, IEP and 504 plan goal and objectives, and environmental considerations. This course provides prerequisite knowledge for implementation in LTSP 401 Application and Implication of Inclusive Teaching Supports. Lecture.

LTSP 315 Literacy: Adaptations and Accommodations 2 cr.

Develop knowledge and skills in the design, implementation and monitoring of adaptations and accommodations for students with learning differences in the area of literacy. Topics focus on curriculum-based assessment, technology, evidence-based instruction including differentiated, systematic and explicit instruction in reading and writing for diverse learners. Emphasis is on the role of the general educator in the delivery of instructional services within a collaborative teaching model. Lecture.

LTSP 325 Numeracy: Adaptations and Accommodations 2 cr.

Develop knowledge and skills in the design, implementation and monitoring of adaptations and accommodations for students with learning differences in the area Numeracy. Topics focus on curriculum-based assessment, technology, and evidence-based instruction including differentiated, systematic and explicit instruction in mathematics for diverse learners. Emphasis is on the role of the general educator in the delivery of instructional services within a collaborative teaching model. Lecture.

LTSP 335 Educated Citizenry: Adaptations and Accommodations 2 cr.

This course, in conjunction with the Literacy and Numeracy Academic Adaptations courses, is designed to prepare prospective teachers to develop and implement appropriate instructional strategies, adaptations, and therapeutic support for students with diverse learning needs across the curriculum in general education programs. Principles of universal design for learning, individualized instruction, and appropriate instructional strategies will focus on the areas of educated citizenry that include science, social studies, special education, early childhood, art and music. Students will develop skills in collaborative approaches to consulting and co-teaching that are known to facilitate the success of students with disabilities in inclusive educational programs. Lecture.

LTSP 401 Implementing Inclusive Education 3 cr.

Building on the on-line course, "Exploring Inclusive Teaching Supports," this course focuses on the application of the various roles of the general education teacher in the delivery of instruction to students with high incidence disabilities in the general classroom. Teacher candidates will design instruction applying the principals of universal design, differentiated instruction and co-teaching for their content area. The candidates will develop strategies for adapting materials and experiences, based on student's learning needs, IEP and 504 plan goals, objectives and SDI, as well as environmental considerations. Lecture.

MATH 050 Topics in Technology 2 cr.

Pass/Non-Pass only. Special Permit, see Dept. Office. Lecture.

MATH 100 Calculus With Algebra I 3 cr.

Initial topics of 111 with topics from algebra integrated as needed. Credit is not allowed for both 100/104, 100/111, or 100/115. Lecture.

MATH 104 Calculus With Algebra and Trigonometry I 4 cr.

Initial topics of 115 with topics from algebra and trigonometry integrated as needed. Credit is not allowed for both 104/100, 104/111, or 104/115. Lecture.

MATH 110 Calculus With Algebra II 3 cr.

Remaining topics of 111 with topics from algebra integrated as needed. Credit is not allowed for both 110/111,110/114, or 110/115. Prerequisite: "C" or better in 100. Lecture. Core Math.

MATH 111 Calculus for Non-Science Students 3 cr.

Limits, continuity, differentiation of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions. An introduction to integration. Credit is not allowed for both 111/100, 111/110, 111/104, 111/114, or 111/115. Lecture. Core Math.

MATH 114 Calculus With Algebra and Trigonometry II 4 cr.

Remaining topics of 115 with topics from algebra and trigonometry integrated as needed. Credit is not allowed for both 114/110, 114/111, 114/115. Prerequisite: "C" or better in 104. Lecture. Core Math.

MATH 115 Calculus I 4 cr.

The same topics as 111 except trigonometric functions are included. Credit is not allowed for both 115/100,115/110, 115/104,115/114, or 115/111. Lecture. Core Math.

MATH 116 Calculus II 4 cr.

Applications of the definite integral, parametric equations, polar coordinates, sequences, and series.Prerequisites: 114 or 115. Prerequisites: "C" or better in 114 or 115. Lecture.

MATH 125 Fundamentals of Statistics 3 cr.

Exploratory data analysis and statistical inference including graphical summaries of data, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Credit not allowed for both 125 and 225. Lecture. Core Math.

MATH 125C Fundamentals of Statistics 3 cr.

Exploratory data analysis and statistical inference including graphical summaries of data, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Credit not allowed for both 125 and 225. Lecture.

MATH 135 Discrete Mathematics 3 cr.

Sets, functions, relations, partial order, methods of propositional logic, introduction to predicate logic, counting, recurrence relations, asymptotic analysis, proof, including induction, introduction to probability, graphs. Lecture.

MATH 210 Matrix Algebra 3 cr.

Computational aspects of systems of linear equations, matrix operations, determinants, vector spaces and subspaces, linear transformations, change of basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, and orthogonality. Prerequisite: 116. Credit is not allowed for both 210 and 310. Lecture.

MATH 215 Calculus III 4 cr.

Calculus of functions of several variables and vector valued functions. Line and surface integrals. Prerequisite: 116. Lecture.

MATH 220 Proof Writing Seminar 1 cr.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to various mathematical proof techniques including conditional proofs, biconditional proofs, proofs by contradiction, induction, and double inclusion. The goal of the course is that the students become more proficient at proof-writing in order to make more seamless the transition to higher level mathematics. Prerequisite: Math 116; Co-requisite: Math 135. Lecture.

MATH 225 Introduction to Biostatistics 3 cr.

Descriptive statistics, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric methods, chi-square tests, regression and correlation methods, and analysis of variance. Credit is not allowed for both 125/225. Prerequisite: Evidence of college level algebra skills. Lecture. Core Math.

MATH 301 Introduction to Probability and Statistics I 3 cr.

Univariate and multivariate probability distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, mathematical expectation, limit theorems. Prerequisite: 116. Lecture.

MATH 302W Introduction to Probability and Statistics II 3 cr.

A continuation of 301 including probability and sampling distributions of random variables, confidence inervals, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: 301. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MATH 308 Numerical Analysis 3 cr.

Linear systems, interpolation, functional approximation, numeric differentiation and integration, and solutions to non-linear equations. May be counted as either mathematics or computer science, but not both. Prerequisites: 116 and COSC 150 or COSC 160. Lecture.

MATH 310 Linear Algebra 4 cr.

Theoretical and computational aspects of systems of linear equations, matrix operations, determinants, vector spaces and subspaces, linear transformations, change of basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, and orthogonality. Includes theorems and proof-writing. Prerequisites: 135, 215. Credit is not allowed for both 210 and 310. Lecture.

MATH 311 Number Theory 3 cr.

Divisibility,congruences,quadratic residues, Diophantine equations, and arithmetic functions. Prerequisites: 135,215, and 220. Lecture.

MATH 314 Differential Equations 3 cr.

First-order ordinary differential equations, theory and solutions of higher order linear ordinary differential equations, the Laplace transform, numerical solutions of differential equations, applications to physical sciences and engineering. Prerequisite: 116. Lecture.

MATH 325W Applied Statistics With Regression 3 cr.

This course begins with a review of inferential statistics. Emphasis on data collection methods, stating hypotheses, confidence intervals and bootstrapping methods for estimating parameters are introduced. Both traditional and re-sampling methods are demonstrated for testing hypotheses. Additional topics covered are graphical methods for exploring distributions and determining outliers, 1-way and 2- way analysis of variance models using a linear models approach, and linear and multiple regression methods. JMP software is used for demonstrating methods. Prerequisites: 225 or 301, or permission of instructor. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MATH 330W Fundamentals of Geometry 3 cr.

Euclidean and Non-Euclidean geometry from both the synthetic and metric axiomatic approach. Prerequisites: 135,215, and 220. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MATH 335 Biostatistics II 3 cr.

This course is a continuation of MATH 225 (Introduction to Biostatistics). Topics include statistical issues in diagnostic tests, contingency table analysis, multiple two-by-two table analysis, linear and multiple regression, logistic regression, survival analysis, and nonparametric statistical procedures. Lecture.

MATH 340 Problem Solving Seminar 1 cr.

Solution and discussion of problems from the Putnam Examination and other sources. Completion of or concurrent enrollment in 215 or permission of instructor. Seminar.

MATH 345 Survival Analysis 3 cr.

Descriptive methods for survival data, survival and hazard functions, proportional and additive hazard methods, parameter inference and regression diagnostics, and multivariate analysis. Prerequisites: (225,335) or (301,302W). Lecture.

MATH 350W History of Mathematics 3 cr.

Multicultural survey of the history of mathematics from the development of number systems to the development of calculus. Contributions of ancient Greek and western mathematics are emphasized, but those of Egyptian, Babylonian, Islamic, Hindu, and Chinese cultures are also discussed. Prerequisites: 135,215, and 311. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MATH 366 Operations Research 3 cr.

The course will provide an introduction to the background of operations including example problems and a brief history. An extensive discussion of the theory and application of linear programming will follow. Other topics will include nonlinear programming, continuous and discrete probability models, dynamic programming, game theory and transportation and network flow models. Prerequisite: 310. Lecture.

MATH 402W Abstract Algebra I 3 cr.

An introduction to algebraic structures: rings, ideals, integral domains, fields, and groups, as well as homomorphisms and isomorphisms. Prerequisites: 135,215, 220, and 310. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MATH 403W Topology 3 cr.

Topological spaces, homeomorphisms, connectedness, compactness, regular and normal spaces, metric spaces, convergence, and separation axioms. Prerequisites: 402W, or 415W. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MATH 412W Abstract Algebra II 3 cr.

A deeper examination of the algebraic structures studied in 402W including quotient groups and rings, extension fields, and other selected topics. Prerequisite: 402W. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MATH 415W Real Analysis I 3 cr.

Functions, sequences and series, limits, continuity and uniform continuity, derivatives. Prerequisites: 135,215,220, and 310. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MATH 416W Real Analysis II 3 cr.

A continuation of 415W including integration theory and advanced topics in analysis. Prerequisite: 415W. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MATH 420 Introduction to Complex Variables 3 cr.

The complex number plane, analytic functions, integration of complex functions, sequences and series, and conformal mappings. Prerequisite: 415W. Lecture.

MATH 425W Experimental Design 3 cr.

Factorial designs, fixed and random effects models, nested and nested-factorial designs, split-plot designs, response surface designs. Prerequisites: 325W or permission of instructor. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MATH 491 Selected Topics in Math I 1 cr.

Topics selected in consultation with the advisor. Lecture.

MATH 492 Selected Topics in Math II 2 cr.

Topics selected in consultation with the advisor. Lecture.

MATH 493 Selected Topics in Math III 3 cr.

Topics selected in consultation with the advisor. Lecture.

MGMT 261 Introduction to Management 3 cr.

This course is an introduction to the basic tasks, functions and responsibilities of managers and the overall environment in which managers and organizations must operate. Areas covered include the planning, organization, and leadership of activities and the context (internal and external) in which managers work to discharge their responsibilities effectively. Lecture.

MGMT 364W Critical Managerial Decision Making 3 cr.

Develops analytical thinking skills and designed to make students better decision-makers. Provides students with the opportunity to identify, infer, analyze, and apply critical thinking and decision-making skills to an organization. Great emphasis is placed on preparing students to think like managers who can deal clearly, rationally, and creatively in a dynamic workplace. In addition, it addresses formal, optimal models as well as behavioral descriptive models. Students will consider risk, decision and outcome evaluation, and assessment of arguments on opposing sides. Equips students with concrete skills in critical thinking and decision making that will allow them to identify, interpret, evaluate and solve organizational problems, as well as provide necessary strategic direction. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MGMT 365 Global Business, Government and Society 3 cr.

This course seeks to present an integrated overview of the social, ethical, legal, regulatory, political, technological, environmental and international constraints, opportunities, and responsibilities facing business organizations and business managers. In particular, the focus is on corporate manager and business decision-making in the context of a domestic and international business environment. Organizational stakeholders, individuals or groups that affect or are affected by the business organization, are targeted in an understanding of their interests, power, and coalitions – that is, their salience – and how business managers may better manage these stakeholders in cooperative engagement for the betterment of business, and the civil society. This course seeks to present an integrated overview of the social, ethical, legal, regulatory, political, technological, environmental and international constraints, opportunities, and responsibilities facing business organizations and business managers. In particular, the focus is on corporate manager and business decision-making in the context of a domestic and international business environment. Organizational stakeholders, individuals or groups that affect or are affected by the business organization, are targeted in an understanding of their interests, power, and coalitions – that is, their salience – and how business managers may better manage these stakeholders in cooperative engagement for the betterment of business, and the civil society. Lecture.

MGMT 366W Behavior in Organizations 3 cr.

This course is an applied treatment of organizational behavior. Students learn a number of theories, concepts, and applications regarding authentic leadership and managerial skills. Topics covered include motivation, personality, perception, group dynamics, team-building, managing diversity, performance appraisals, leadership, communication, decision-making, conflict, organizational politics, power, change, organizational development, and the international aspects of behavioral management. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MGMT 368W Business Ethics and Global Citizenship 3 cr.

This course discusses the relevance of social needs in developing a sense of ethics, the need for personal ethics in business decisions, and the importance of a shared sense of values in developing productive work communities. The emphasis throughout is on practical issues facing people in business. The discussions of ethical issues are used as a forum for developing business communication skills. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MGMT 445 International Management 3 cr.

This course is a study of multinational companies' structures, strategies and management processes. The course includes a thorough understanding of international management, competent awareness of cultural diversity and development of decision making skills in multinational settings. Lecture.

MGMT 451 Foundations of Leadership 3 cr.

This course provides an overview of topics and experiences relevant to the development of individual leadership potential. A primary goal of this course is to show how effective leadership can be nurtured and developed in individuals. Students will have an opportunity to practice leadership skills and receive feedback on their leadership styles in one-to-one, as well as group settings. This course is directed towards making students think, act, and become effective leaders in today's corporate society. Lecture.

MGMT 452 Leadership in Teams 3 cr.

This course, second in a series of courses focusing on leadership development, emphasizes team or shared leadership development. Team leadership is viewed as leadership "in" and "of" teams, primarily in work organizations. Leadership roles in teams may be fulfilled by one or more individuals or shared leadership may occur. Beginning with an emphasis on an individual leading a team of individuals, participants over time learn how to distribute leadership within their teams. Focuses on various types of teams in a variety of organizations and examines the influence of context, culture, individual values, and technology on the emergence and effectiveness of team leadership. Lecture.

MGMT 453 Leading Change 3 cr.

Leading Change in Organizations provides the capstone experience in the Leadership and Change Management program. The course is a theoretical and applied treatment of the most challenging task for organizations in the new millennium. The intent is to develop the capacity in students to consult with organizations on strategic leadership and purposive-change management practices. Students develop a "systems perspective" to bring about change in organizations and understand the roles played by leadership at all levels to champion the change that leads to positive outcomes. Students learn a number of theories, concepts, and techniques related to applying the leadership and change management process to organizations, both large and small. Lecture.

MGMT 454 Leadership and Ethics 3 cr.

This course builds upon students' skills developed in the foundation Leadership and Change Management major course requirements and seeks to translate these skills into leadership in action. Primarily through a service learning opportunity, students are expected to demonstrate their leadership, team, and change management skills in a community-based field project. In addition, through case studies, biographies and field exploration, students are able to recognize the importance of ethical leadership and ethical leaders for the success of any organization and seek to develop sensitivity toward the interdependence that exists between business organizations and the community and residents they affect. This course emphasizes an introspective approach to understanding each student's leadership style. Lecture.

MGMT 455 Sustainable Enterprise 3 cr.

Explores changing patterns of life on earth for humans and other living species, directly relevant to the role of mangers and the business organizations in society. Drawing insights from interrelated fields, such as ecology, sociology and business disciplines this course will ask the following questions: What is sustainability? What constitute long-term solutions for business organizations to address some of the big sustainability problems we face today? What do managers need to know about themselves, society, business and the natural world to understand how sustainability is achieved? Students in this course will explore the idea of corporate ecology and explore the notion of sustainability through in-class discussion, readings, films, research, cases and simulations Lecture.

MGMT 456 Strategic Project Management 3 cr.

Provides an overview of project management roles and environments, the project life cycle, various techniques of planning, control, and evaluation. At the organizational strategic level, the course examines the influences of organizational structures and organizational behaviors in projects as well as aligning a project's goals and objectives with the organization's goals and objectives. Analysis at the operational level includes the nature of global and cross-functional projects and project teams, how project teams are used to accomplish continuous improvement and to significantly change the organization, and the considerations of stakeholders in the entire project management cycle. Greater detail at the operational level addresses implementation issues, optimizing the value of a project management group within the organization, and improving individual performance within a project group. Provides a comprehensive framework for effective project management strategically aligned and executed across an organization. This course is a senior-level course that progressively and collectively builds on the skills and competencies of communication, decision making, stakeholder management, and leadership. Lecture.

MGMT 460 Strategic Human Resource Management 3 cr.

Explores the strategic role, technical functions and services provided by an organization's personnel/human resources department. Among the topics covered are: human resource planning, recruiting, selection, performance appraisal, training, compensation, occupational health and safety, employee rights, labor unions, and equal employment opportunity issues. Lecture.

MGMT 463 Honors Thesis in Management 3 cr.

Designed as an independent research project, whereby students are expected to write and defend a thesis of publishable quality on a management topic of their choice using constructs and methods learned through the curriculum in the major. Since this course is the capstone to the management major, students are to offer theoretical and practical links beyond what is taught in their coursework. If students choose to conduct an empirical study, proper research design and methodology should be used. Lecture.

MGMT 493 Independent Scholarly Study 1 TO 3 cr.

Student must initiate an original research project in a field of business of his choice. The project is then scrutinized by a Committee of three faculty members. If the project is approved, the Dean will choose a faculty member as director of the project. The project must be completed within an academic semester. This course is open to students in all concentrations in the School of Business. Prerequisite: Student must qualify as a University Scholar. Independent Study.

MGMT 499W Strategic Management 3 cr.

This is the capstone course of the undergraduate business curriculum. It utilizes top-level, comprehensive organizational case studies as the primary tool to provide an interactive educational experience. This course is a comprehensive examination of the students' entire business education, requiring the utilization and integration of the important concepts studied in all other business courses. Strategic management provides students with the opportunity to: 1)improve the system skills needed to integrate knowledge from all the functional areas of business, 2)build the cognitive skills needed to diagnose strategic organizational problems competently, 3)develop the imaginative skills needed to brainstorm possibilities and find creative solutions, 4)sharpen the interpersonal skills needed to work effectively in group settings, and 5)strengthen the persuasive skills needed to communicate effectively and successfully defend their decisions in both oral and written forms. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MINT 490 Student Teaching - Ireland 6 cr.

Students who plan to student teach may fulfill part of their student teaching requirement by swtudent teaching for 10 weeks in Ireland. Final Placement approval contingent upon department review. Student Teaching.

MKTG 271 Introduction to Marketing 3 cr.

Provides an understanding of the dynamic role marketing plays in society and in organizations. Students build a knowledge base with regard to: strategic marketing, market segmentation, marketing research, consumer behavior, the product mix, the promotion mix, the distribution mix, the pricing mix, technology integration, global marketing, and non-profit marketing. Lecture.

MKTG 373 Sales Fundamentals 3 cr.

This course introduces the fundamentals of salesmanship and the problems confronted by the sales manager. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of production planning, pricing, market analysis and specific areas of sales management. Attention will be given to management of the sales force, recruitment, selection and ethical considerations. Software will be integrated into this course to reflect current trends in sales management and the selling function. Lecture.

MKTG 374W Research Applications in Marketing 3 cr.

Examines the methods used by business management to obtain the information needed to support marketing decisions: selection of target market, design of product, distribution, promotion, and pricing policy. These methods include exploratory (qualitative) research, conclusive (quantitative) research, sampling theory and application, and various statistical techniques used to support marketing research. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MKTG 376 Sports Marketing 3 cr.

This course will provide an intensive evaluation of marketing techniques and promotional strategy. In addition, the topical coverage will include the marketing mix, new product strategy and services, interactive promotion, event marketing and value-added marketing. Lecture.

MKTG 377 Sports Management 3 cr.

This course will provide a knowledge base in planning, organizing, motivating and controlling sports organizations. The content of this course will help in the development of skills necessary to manage organizations in the sports industry including: marketing firms, licensing agencies, major retailers, professional sports organizations and sporting venues. Lecture.

MKTG 378 Event Marketing and Planning 3 cr.

Event marketing is a fast growing field that requires professional knowledge and skills. Event Marketing and Planning will examine the foundation of sports, corporate and traditional event management including finance, operations, marketing, ticketing and sponsorship. The course will address major trends and successful business practices in event marketing today. Lecture.

MKTG 443 International Marketing 3 cr.

Helps students develop skills in analyzing economic and non-economic factors for identifying and evaluating foreign market opportunities; this course will allow students to become familiar with different approaches for segementing international markets; it will encourage students to develop skills in formulating product, price, distribution, and promotion strategies in the context of business outside the United States; and this course will help develop skills in undertaking international strategic marketing planning. Lecture.

MKTG 471 Services Marketing 3 cr.

This course focuses on the marketing of services and the techniques necessary to improve customer service. It is taught from the perspectives of both marketing managers and customers. Students will develop a broad knowledge base regarding the following marketing concepts: customer expectations, complaint behavior, measures of customer satisfaction, relationship marketing, servicescapes, collaborative service culture, discretionary collaborative behavior and service rules. Upon completion of the course, students will understand not only how to effectively market a service, but also how to get the best service. Lecture.

MKTG 473 Sales Management 3 cr.

Introduces the fundamentals of salesmanship and the problems confronted by the sales manager. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of the sales model, production planning, pricing, market analysis and specific areas of sales management. Attention will be given to management of the sales force, recruitment, selection and ethical considerations. Lecture.

MKTG 475 Consumer Behavior 3 cr.

Encourages the student to develop an understanding of the consumer from the perspective of the marketing manager. The course explores the factors that affect the consumer, which range from a macro level (the effect of the physical and social environment on the consumer) to a micro level (knowledge, attitudes, and actions of the individual consumer). Segmentation, positioning, and marketing mix strategies are discussed in relation to consumer behavior theories. Mini-projects are assigned to allow the student to apply theoretical concepts to real world experiences. Lecture.

MKTG 476 Product Management 3 cr.

This course examines methods and tools leading to successful product development and commercialization, as well as the maintenance of existing products and product lines, including product positioning, design, marketing mix, testing, forecasting and product launch, plus product strategy and product life cycle management, using case studies and computer simlations. Lecture.

MKTG 477W Strategic Marketing 3 cr.

Designed to enable the student to apply acquired marketing knowledge and expertise to real world opportunities. The case method is employed using marketing situations that illustrate opportunity analysis, marketing environments, product management, communication planning, pricing and distribution strategies, and global planning. Students demonstrate decision making skills through learning to identify and define a marketing problem, analyze and evaluate it, and prepare recommendations concerning implementation for the organization and its environment. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MKTG 478 Business to Business Marketing 3 cr.

This course focuses on business-to-business marketing. It will demonstrate the differences between industrial and consumer marketing; how industrial marketers evaluate their marketing environments, including an understanding of customers and competitors. The course applies the elements of the marketing mix to industrial marketing and provides a framework for developing and evaluating strategies and plans for industrial markets. Lecture.

MKTG 479 Retail Management 3 cr.

This course focuses on retail management from a strategic perspective while emphasizing the similarities and differences between the retail and industrial sector. Emphasis will be placed on consumer behavior, franchising and the changing retail environment. This course applies the elements of the marketing mix to retail markets and provides a framework for strategic planning in the retail sector. Lecture.

MLAR 101 Elementary Arabic I 3 cr.

Fundamentals of oral and written Arabic. Focus on development of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills, and culture. Special emphasis on oral communication. Lecture.

MLAR 102 Elementary Arabic II 3 cr.

The sequel to 101. Prerequisite: 101 or equivalent. Lecture.

MLAR 201 Intermediate Arabic I 3 cr.

An expansion of the language skills acquired in Arabic 101 and 102. Strengthening of basic structures and introduction of more complex structures. This course will increase accuracy in listening, speaking, reading and writing and promote knowledge of cultural background. Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent. Lecture.

MLAR 202 Intermediate Arabic II 3 cr.

Fourth semester capstone course designed to continue the development of oral and written skills. Students will read and discuss selected cultural and literary texts, review grammar in the context of situations and readings, and explore cultural trends and issues. Prerequisite: 201 or equivalent. Lecture.

MLAR 250 Contemporary World Cinema 3 cr.

A grand tour of the cultural diversity of the contemporary world, as seen through the lenses of award-winning filmmakers from Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Taught in English. Global Diversity Theme Area Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

MLAR 275 Human Rights in Film 1 cr.

Survey of contemporary human rights issues as depicted in recent documentaries and feature films, offered in conjunction with annual departmental film series. May be repeated for credit. Taught in English. Lecture.

MLCH 101 Elementary Chinese I 3 cr.

Fundamentals of oral and written Chinese. Focus on development of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills, and culture. Special emphasis on oral communication. Lecture.

MLCH 102 Elementary Chinese II 3 cr.

The sequel to 101. Prerequisite: 101 or equivalent. Lecture.

MLCH 201 Intermediate Chinese I 3 cr.

An expansion of the language skills acquired in Chinese 101 and 102. Strengthening of basic structures and introduction of more complex structures. This course will increase accuracy in listening, speaking, reading and writing and promote knowledge of cultural background. Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent. Lecture.

MLCH 202 Intermediate Chinese II 3 cr.

Fourth semester capstone course designed to continue the development of oral and written skills. Students will read and discuss selected cultural and literary texts, review grammar in the context of situations and readings, and explore cultural trends and issues. Prerequisite: 201 or equivalent. Lecture.

MLCH 250 Contemporary World Cinema 3 cr.

A grand tour of the cultural diversity of the contemporary world, as seen through the lenses of award-winning filmmakers from Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Taught in English. Course Attribute: Global Diversity Theme Area Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

MLCH 275 Human Rights in Film 1 cr.

Survey of contemporary human rights issues as depicted in recent documentaries and feature films, offered in conjunction with annual departmental film series. May be repeated for credit. Taught in English. Lecture.

MLFR 101 Elementary French I 3 cr.

Fundamentals of oral and written French. Focus on development of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills, and culture. Special emphasis on oral communication. Lecture.

MLFR 102 Elementary French II 3 cr.

The sequel to 101. Prerequisite: 101 or equivalent. Lecture.

MLFR 103 Basic French for Business 3 cr.

Introduction to spoken and written French with emphasis on usage in the business world. Lecture.

MLFR 115 French for Musicians I 2 cr.

Specially designed for majors in music to provide them with those skills in French needed fortheir professional requisites. Registration limited to students in the School of Music. Lecture.

MLFR 120 Intensive Elementary French 6 cr.

Fundamentals of oral and written French. Utilizes a different approach allowing the student to complete one year's work in one semester. Lecture.

MLFR 201 Intermediate French I 3 cr.

An expansion of the language skills acquired in 101 and 102. Strengthening of basic structures and introduction of more complex structures. This course will increase accuracy in listening, speaking, reading and writing and promote knowledge of cultural background. Prerequisite 102 or equivalent. Lecture.

MLFR 202 Intermediate French II 3 cr.

Fourth semester capstone course designed to continue the development of oral and written skills. Students will read and discuss selected cultural and literary texts, review grammar in the context of situations and readings, and explore cultural trends and issues. Prerequisite: 201 or equivalent. Lecture.

MLFR 220 Intensive Intemediate French 6 cr.

Review and continuation of 120. Utilizes techniques allowing the student to complete one-year's work in one semester. Prerequisite: 102 or 120. Lecture.

MLFR 250 Contemporary World Cinema 3 cr.

A grand tour of the cultural diversity of the contemporary world, as seen through the lenses of award-winning filmmakers from Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Taught in English. Course Attribute: Global Diversity Theme Area Lecture. Theme Area Global Diversity.

MLFR 270 Perspectives on the Holocaust 3 cr.

Analysis of the Holocaust from a variety of perspectives (social, political, historical, cinematic, artistic, moral, etc.) to help students appreciate the enormity of the event. A team-taught interdisciplinary course. Taught in English. Lecture. Theme Area Social Justice.

MLFR 275 Human Rights in Film 1 cr.

Survey of contemporary human rights issues as depicted in recent documentaries and feature films, offered in conjunction with annual departmental film series. May be repeated for credit. Taught in English. Lecture.

MLFR 300 Introduction to Conversation and Composition 3 cr.

Focus on increasing oral and written skills through reading and discussion of materials related to everyday life and current events. Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. Lecture.

MLFR 301W French Conversation and Composition I 3 cr.

A course designed to expand oral and written fluency through extensive reading, discussion, and writing on a variety of topics. A systematic grammar review is an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 302W French Conversation and Composition II 3 cr.

The sequel to 301W with more emphasis on fluency in speaking and writing and idiomatic use of the language. Prerequisite: 301W or equivalent. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 306W Intensive French Conversation and Composition 6 cr.

Combination of 301W and 302W which fulfills the prerequisite for all courses above this level. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 314W Individual Study I 1 TO 3 cr.

Study of special topics, with written permission of the department chairperson. Variable credit. Independent Study. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 315W Individual Study II 1 TO 3 cr.

Study of special topics, with written permission of the department chairperson. Variable credit. Independent Study. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 320W Stylistics 3 cr.

Comparative study of English/French style in spoken and written French. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 321 Phonetics-French 3 cr.

Mechanics of phonation with comparative English - French application to phonemic analysis of French. Lecture.

MLFR 322W Théâtre de l'Avant Garde 3 cr.

Representative authors of the "avant garde" theatre since 1950, including Ionesco, Beckett, Genet, Schehadé, Vian, Pinget and others. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 325W Realism and Naturalism 3 cr.

Theories of the two movements in the latter part of the 19th century. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 329W 17th Century French Literature 3 cr.

Representative works in French prose, poetry and theatre. Lecture.

MLFR 360W French for Business 3 cr.

Spoken and written language of business French: letter writing, import, export, commercial transactions and business protocols. Topics will include business, finance, marketing and economics. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 370W French Novel in Translation 3 cr.

A general introduction to the history and theorization of the French novel from its precursory prose antecedents to contemporary examples. Students will gain greater knowledge of France's literary tradition as well as familiarity with the principal techniques of literary analysis. The course is open to all students with an interest in literature, regardless of mastery of the French languages. Readings, lectures and discussions will be in English. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 419W European Union 3 cr.

The study of the history and politics of the European Union, including its multicultural nature, economy, role and impact on today's world and its relations with the US. Taught in English. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 429W 18th Century French Literature and Culture 3 cr.

An introduction to the literature and culture of 18th century France. Studying a variety of literary, artistic, and political works, students will retrace the cultural tensions that marked this period known for both the lavishness of Versailles and the egalitarian severity of the guillotine. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 460W French Culture and Civilization 3 cr.

The major cultural and socio-political movements of France through its literary works. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 462W Survey of French Literature I: Middle Ages to 17th Century 3 cr.

Representative authors and works from the Middle Ages to the 17th Century. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 463W Survey of French Literature II: 18th Century to Modern Period 3 cr.

Main authors and movements from the 18th Century to the present. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 465W Existentialism 3 cr.

Analysis and discussion of selected literary and philosophical works. Lecture. University Core Writing Intens.

MLFR 467W Advanced French Grammar 3 cr.

Study of the finer points o